New BBC NI programme - 21 Feb @ 2100

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Forgive me - but that's really not the best part - good as it is.

It's the next couple of sentences (to the effect that):

It's what we get paid for,​
And we've gotta do it.​
Proper professional attitude.

Well said that man.
No, better bit was ‘ I’m being posted to Hong Kong for two years. I never want to see that place again’.
 
I don't have any love for the UDR even thro my da served 22 years with them, but to come out with silly derogatory comments like that is showing what sort of idiot you really are.
197 of this regiment were killed whilst serving during Banner and another 61 Murdered after they had left so I think a bit of respect is due.
See my posts at 62 & 88 and then remove your head from your arse.
 
Perhaps.

I think we learned too much, or at least learned the wrong lessons and assumed that an NI model was how to do COIN rather than working out which parts of the model were inherently NI specific (arguably most of it).

Many of our early COIN failures in Iraq were from attempting to fit the problem to an NI derived solution rather than acknowledging that the problem facing us was unique, as with all COIN, and treating it accordingly. COIN techniques don't template well which is why the doctrine is so poor.
Well one lesson unlearnt was deploy lots of infantry and base locally
 
See my posts at 62 & 88 and then remove your head from your arse.
@piper89 . What is your problem? I served in the UDR and we used those titles for our self’s, why have you got such a cock stand? Maybe you should have a word with your Da, you complete cockwomble - I’m sure he would be proud of you. Aye,and maybe if you served in the regiment you wouldn’t be such a tit, instead of trying for some reflected glory, you tit.
And just to reinforce what a tit you are, I work along side the Aftercare - ask your da who they are, because you won’t know, you tit.
 
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@piper89 . What is your problem? I served in the UDR and we used those titles for our self’s, why have you got such a cock stand? Maybe you should have a word with your Da, you complete cockwomble - I’m sure he would be proud of you. Aye,and maybe if you served in the regiment you wouldn’t be such a tit, instead of trying for some reflected glory, you tit.
And just to reinforce what a tit you are, I work along side the Aftercare - ask your da who they are, because you won’t know, you tit.
@piper89 you are a sad tit, and unfortunately as you won’t engage other than to post ‘dumb’ comments, our friendship is at an end;)
 
@piper89 . What is your problem? I served in the UDR and we used those titles for our self’s, why have you got such a cock stand? Maybe you should have a word with your Da, you complete cockwomble - I’m sure he would be proud of you. Aye,and maybe if you served in the regiment you wouldn’t be such a tit, instead of trying for some reflected glory, you tit.
And just to reinforce what a tit you are, I work along side the Aftercare - ask your da who they are, because you won’t know, you tit.
The Ulster Defence Regiment and the Royal Irish Regiment (Home Service) Aftercare Service
Bespoke support to veterans resident in Northern Ireland who formerly served in the Ulster Defence Regiment and the Home Service element of The Royal Irish Regiment during Operation BANNER was a priority six years ago when the R IRISH Home Service was disbanded and the Aftercare Service came into being. Conditions in Northern Ireland continue to hold challenge for veterans in need and, in recognition of this, the MOD has decided to continue funding and supporting the service until at least 2016.
Based at four centres throughout the Province, it consists of caseworkers and support staff, mostly Army veterans themselves, who provide outreach to the veterans’ community, advising and sign-posting to other trusted agencies which assist those in need. It offers holistic resolution to each case via:
Welfare – via domiciliary visits, ranging from simple befriending to full-blown intervention in issues of bereavement, debt, housing, benefits and pensions and including assistance in application for War Disablement Pension or Armed Forces Compensation Scheme. Specific and grateful mention is made of proven liaison with Service Personnel and Veterans Agency/Veterans Welfare Service (SPVA/VWS) and The Royal British Legion-funded Citizens’ Advice Bureau (RBL/CAB) debt and benefit advice scheme.
Medical – building trusted pathways to the wider National Health Service via a client’s General Practitioner and also able to offer immediate referral to psychological therapies and physiotherapy for conditions caused by or made worse by military service. Significant and successful liaison is routinely undertaken with Combat Stress.
Vocational – sign-posting to Regular Forces Employment Agency (RFEA) provides career and employment advice. An MOD scheme has recently ended which offered a discretionary training award for a limited number of eligible personnel to enhance their qualifications and employment skills.
Benevolence – assisting in supporting cases of proven financial need. Successful liaison is routinely undertaken with ABF The Soldier’s Charity, the RBL and various Regimental Benevolent Funds.
Expansion of the service to assist all veterans resident in Northern Ireland is still being considered but may not be necessary as a result of better cooperation between veterans’ support agencies and charities engendered by active (although subtle) implementation of the nation’s Covenant to its Armed Forces.
The Aftercare Service Director says: “We are living in challenging times to meet potential and enduring demand from so many veterans who continue to face uncertainty and potential disadvantage as a result of their service. We look forward to renewed engagement with our many Cobseo partners to deliver the best possible support to people in their time of need, who served bravely and unconditionally throughout recent conflicts.”
The Aftercare Service can be contacted initially on 028 9042 0145 or through its website: www.aftercareservice.org

Google is your friend **** face
 
The Ulster Defence Regiment and the Royal Irish Regiment (Home Service) Aftercare Service
Bespoke support to veterans resident in Northern Ireland who formerly served in the Ulster Defence Regiment and the Home Service element of The Royal Irish Regiment during Operation BANNER was a priority six years ago when the R IRISH Home Service was disbanded and the Aftercare Service came into being. Conditions in Northern Ireland continue to hold challenge for veterans in need and, in recognition of this, the MOD has decided to continue funding and supporting the service until at least 2016.
Based at four centres throughout the Province, it consists of caseworkers and support staff, mostly Army veterans themselves, who provide outreach to the veterans’ community, advising and sign-posting to other trusted agencies which assist those in need. It offers holistic resolution to each case via:
Welfare – via domiciliary visits, ranging from simple befriending to full-blown intervention in issues of bereavement, debt, housing, benefits and pensions and including assistance in application for War Disablement Pension or Armed Forces Compensation Scheme. Specific and grateful mention is made of proven liaison with Service Personnel and Veterans Agency/Veterans Welfare Service (SPVA/VWS) and The Royal British Legion-funded Citizens’ Advice Bureau (RBL/CAB) debt and benefit advice scheme.
Medical – building trusted pathways to the wider National Health Service via a client’s General Practitioner and also able to offer immediate referral to psychological therapies and physiotherapy for conditions caused by or made worse by military service. Significant and successful liaison is routinely undertaken with Combat Stress.
Vocational – sign-posting to Regular Forces Employment Agency (RFEA) provides career and employment advice. An MOD scheme has recently ended which offered a discretionary training award for a limited number of eligible personnel to enhance their qualifications and employment skills.
Benevolence – assisting in supporting cases of proven financial need. Successful liaison is routinely undertaken with ABF The Soldier’s Charity, the RBL and various Regimental Benevolent Funds.
Expansion of the service to assist all veterans resident in Northern Ireland is still being considered but may not be necessary as a result of better cooperation between veterans’ support agencies and charities engendered by active (although subtle) implementation of the nation’s Covenant to its Armed Forces.
The Aftercare Service Director says: “We are living in challenging times to meet potential and enduring demand from so many veterans who continue to face uncertainty and potential disadvantage as a result of their service. We look forward to renewed engagement with our many Cobseo partners to deliver the best possible support to people in their time of need, who served bravely and unconditionally throughout recent conflicts.”
The Aftercare Service can be contacted initially on 028 9042 0145 or through its website: www.aftercareservice.org

Google is your friend **** face
And your point is? Maybe ask your da about P***r Ba****y or I***e ly***e, he’ll know who they are. Which you won’t you never served tit. Are you aware of the recent fire? No thought not, tit.
 
And your point is? Maybe ask your da about P***r Ba****y or I***e ly***e, he’ll know who they are. Which you won’t you never served tit.
I will get the ouija board out and ask him as for me not serving I must contact Glasgow and tell them to stop the monthly pension they have been paying for the last few years as it must belong to somebody else,
but then I don't have to justify my service or lack there of to some mong on the internet....
 
I will get the ouija board out and ask him as for me not serving I must contact Glasgow and tell them to stop the monthly pension they have been paying for the last few years as it must belong to somebody else,
but then I don't have to justify my service or lack there of to some mong on the internet....
******* hell mate you need to chill out. It’s the internet, you don’t know me, and I don’t know you maybe we’re both telling our truth. (Your still a tit) note smiley and ******* chill out.
 
I will get the ouija board out and ask him as for me not serving I must contact Glasgow and tell them to stop the monthly pension they have been paying for the last few years as it must belong to somebody else,
but then I don't have to justify my service or lack there of to some mong on the internet....
Anyway, if your on your pension since 2011, you are a mere sprog, 38 years and counting:)
 
Read his war books, 7 in total. I think I paid a fiver for them
Brilliant books, my Grandad posted me three when i was on Telic. After the old ****** croaked it my dad told me he served with Spike at Cassino, i always grew up thinking he was an old prick for beating my dad.
After my dad telling me what he was told about Cassino i certainly showed more respect.
 
COIN techniques don't template well which is why the doctrine is so poor.
I'm grateful to @irlsgt bringing me back to this. It's been bugging me.

Cecilia has unintentionally articulated one of the key mental obstacles faced by the officer corps of the Brit Army, in my experience.

Somehow, our people are taught from Day One to believe that the Brit Army's teaching is infallible, requiring the Officer simply to Do The Drills in order to succeed.

Instead of being taught - above all else - to appreciate the situation they face, before spending som time figuring out how to deal with it.

If the education was more rigorous, ambitious folk looking to sustain a reputation for talent wouldn't be rewarded for making assumptions as fatuous as:

Well, they were self evidently COIN
. . . as if, when it all went horribly wrong, it was down to the opposition failing to (sportingly) conform to Brit expectations.

Mebbe that's just me.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Cecilia has unintentionally articulated one of the key mental obstacles faced by the officer corps of the Brit Army, in my experience.

Somehow, our people are taught from Day One to believe that the Brit Army's teaching is infallible, requiring the Officer simply to Do The Drills in order to succeed.

Instead of being taught - above all else - to appreciate the situation they face, before spending som time figuring out how to deal with it.
No, quite the reverse. It may have been the case in your day that you were taught to follow the drills; this would certainly explain the multiple times you have lamented the lack of prescriptive COIN doctrine on other arrse threads. Nowadays, however, we are taught to appreciate the situation and deviate from the doctrine (or abandon it) as required to meet the situation that we face.

When I say that the doctrine is poor, it is to make that point. For COIN, the doctrine must necessarily be imprecise because it is less templateable than almost any other type of operation. This makes it of comparatively little value and I even question the COIN principles we've chosen as I don't think they're as universally applicable as the principles of war. Personally I'd replace most of the COIN doctrine with a couple of academic works but that's not really how the army does things.

If the education was more rigorous, ambitious folk looking to sustain a reputation for talent wouldn't be rewarded for making assumptions as fatuous as:
. . . as if, when it all went horribly wrong, it was down to the opposition failing to (sportingly) conform to Brit expectations.
I hope you appreciate the beautiful irony in these last paragraphs.

In seeking to redefine Iraq and Afghanistan as 'not COIN', counter to the view of just about every academic writing on the subject, you are calling (not for the first time) for a precise taxonomy of operational types seemingly on the grounds that if operations have different features and solutions then they can't possibly be COIN. That seems remarkably inflexible and also fairly pointless.

That you do this while simultaneously arguing that those currently serving are too rigid in our thinking is highly amusing. Far from being inflexible doctrinal adherents, we're happy to say that everything where we fight an insurgency is COIN but to accept that solutions to the insurgency will be completely different depending on the situation. The terminology of the operation bears little relation to the tactics: it's descriptive, not a prescription. Calling it COIN merely puts you in a particular mindset and doesn't presuppose any particular tactical response so when you make comments about the opposition not sportingly conforming to Brit expectations, it says nothing about my understanding of COIN tactics and doctrine but rather a lot about yours.
 
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