New BBC NI programme - 21 Feb @ 2100

#81
In my experience, there was a little appetite for extracting and applying lessons learned from the 70s, 80s and 90s
Wind that back a decade at a time, and you'd find little has changed over nigh on half a century.

Sadly.

Only difference is you now have a generation who are fluent in Doctrinal bollox, but no more capable than their predecessors at getting to grips with complexity on the basis of first principles.
 
#82
Wind that back a decade at a time, and you'd find little has changed over nigh on half a century.

Sadly.

Only difference is you now have a generation who are fluent in Doctrinal bollox, but no more capable than their predecessors at getting to grips with complexity on the basis of first principles.

True, my YO COIN education was largely based on how fab we were in Malaya and how woeful the US was in Vietnam. We seemed to draw a veil over Kenya and Aden and Dhofar was just a rumour!

It might be argued that the current Army is something of a prisoner of the TELIC / HERRICK experience as much as their forebears were of the Falklands and NI.

At the moment, we probably need to look at and learn from the Reichsheer and Wehrmacht of the 20s and 30s about how to train an army in armoured warfare without actually having any (or much) armour.
 
#83
Without whom the Regular Army would have spent considerably more time on 6-month tours 'in Province".

I still think of some of the isolated farmers / PT UDR that we used to visit on STP patrols and wonder what became of them post-ceasefire. Brave men and women.
This one didn't make the ceasefire.
First team prop in my time at Armagh RFC.
Batchelor, farming with his elderly mother near the border.
Shot in the back when feeding the animals one night.
Ethnically cleansed.
Always think of Harry at Remembrance.

UDR Association: London Branch - The Roll of Honour
 
#84
Caledon - just a short drive from Emyvale and Monaghan... It's a shame that in the rewriting of the story of the conflict in Northern Ireland that the campaign of assassination and intimidation of the Protestant community along the border is so often ignored and overlooked. Much like the constant bleating about the Birmingham 6 has very largely ignored the matter of justice for the 21 dead and the 182 casualties.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#85
Without whom the Regular Army would have spent considerably more time on 6-month tours 'in Province".

I still think of some of the isolated farmers / PT UDR that we used to visit on STP patrols and wonder what became of them post-ceasefire. Brave men and women.
I did a 2 year tour with 2UDR Co Armagh. 1975/8 We lost about 14 dead during my time with them. One particular fellow who opened his front door in the North and his back garden gate in the South was particularly vulnerable. I used to tell him to take a weapon home with him. His reply was always the same;
" When they come for me there will be too many of them" They came for him alright. His name was L/C Tommy Armstrong a Gamekeeper at Caladon.

An Irish Guardsman attached had his English wife join the UDR, she got killed at Middleton. I had the job of knocking him up at 2am to give him the bad news I sat with him until 6am while he cried into his army towel. The UDR did their duty alright, some of them were 30 years on 'Active Service' some died violently long after they retired.
 
#86
Caledon - just a short drive from Emyvale and Monaghan... It's a shame that in the rewriting of the story of the conflict in Northern Ireland that the campaign of assassination and intimidation of the Protestant community along the border is so often ignored and overlooked. Much like the constant bleating about the Birmingham 6 has very largely ignored the matter of justice for the 21 dead and the 182 casualties.
Amazing how history is twisted to fit the current victim narative. In 1980 'Op Fortress' was all about protecting the soft targets along the Border. I spent many a happy/wet time lurking in our North Armagh TAOR with additional time off for good behaviour attached to 19 Field in Fermanagh.
 
#87
About 5m 41 secs in, you get a few frames of the chap below, shooting at somebody:
NI_1.jpg

I had to chuckle.

The same sequence featured, for several months, in the opening sequence for the BBC local news programme just after the 6 o'clock news, while I was at Depot Queen's Div.

And that man there was a Cpl on my training team

And he lived in fear that the Depot RSM might watch the news, and clock that his rear sight was down throughout that engagement :)

You'd have to be quick to spot it.

I guess that's what being an RSM is really all about
 
#90
. . . . and then this:
NI_2RRF.jpg

. . . count from left 4 faces, and that man (Steve M#####w) was in my platoon when first I set foot in 2RRF/NI in 1975..
 
#91
Anyone see the reporter ask 'Do you enjoy this type of soldiering?' reply 'Hahahahahahhahahahahahahahahhaaaahahahhahahhaahhahaha'
Forgive me - but that's really not the best part - good as it is.

It's the next couple of sentences (to the effect that):

It's what we get paid for,​
And we've gotta do it.​
Proper professional attitude.

Well said that man.
 
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#93
Anyone see the reporter ask 'Do you enjoy this type of soldiering?' reply 'Hahahahahahhahahahahahahahahhaaaahahahhahahhaahhahaha'
There was something very similar on the BBC as they were pulling out of Bastion. Some platoon of inf were sat on a outlying hill position which was being collapsed. As it was being closed down they’d spent the last 3 months living on rat packs and sleeping in a hole.

First bloke they interviewed was a captain who gave it bags of “this is proper soldiering” “it’s what we joined for” “we love this” when asked about what it’d been like staying there prior to them pulling out.

The second guy was a jock/lcpl who, with a visibly heroic display of self discipline, manage to avoid actually saying “it was f****ng dog***t” whilst leaving you in no doubt how much they’d been enjoying themselves.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#94
About 5m 41 secs in, you get a few frames of the chap below, shooting at somebody:
View attachment 323335
I had to chuckle.

The same sequence featured, for several months, in the opening sequence for the BBC local news programme just after the 6 o'clock news, while I was at Depot Queen's Div.

And that man there was a Cpl on my training team

And he lived in fear that the Depot RSM might watch the news, and clock that his rear sight was down throughout that engagement :)

You'd have to be quick to spot it.

I guess that's what being an RSM is really all about
I think you'll find that man is an Arrser, that he's passed the same comment on here and that he reported that he lived for years in fear of his sergeant major noticing and that a year or two back I referred to that story.

That said, it's nice to put a picture to the story.
 
#95
First bloke they interviewed was a captain who gave it bags of “this is proper soldiering” “it’s what we joined for” “we love this” when asked about what it’d been like staying there prior to them pulling out.
No doubt the local indigenous would have been delighted to know they had been hosting Rupert on his adventure holiday of a lifetime.
 
#97
Come on we all know they were Uncle Dermotts Rangers/Untimely Death Regiment/Upside Down Regiment - to the stupid.
I don't have any love for the UDR even thro my da served 22 years with them, but to come out with silly derogatory comments like that is showing what sort of idiot you really are.
197 of this regiment were killed whilst serving during Banner and another 61 Murdered after they had left so I think a bit of respect is due.
 
#98
I don't have any love for the UDR even thro my da served 22 years with them, but to come out with silly derogatory comments like that is showing what sort of idiot you really are.
197 of this regiment were killed whilst serving during Banner and another 61 Murdered after they had left so I think a bit of respect is due.
Nicknames, banter - no real disrespect intended.

It's been part and parcel of professional soldiering since before Alfred mobilised the fyrd to help his full time warriors bring the Vikings to heel.

You lot need to get over yourselves.

With all due respect :)
 
Stonker, greetings. It was Spike Milligan? that also used very similar words of disgust regarding our actions in Aden, as we were there, and he wasn't we thought him unfair. However I do believe he was in North Africa during his service?
Read his war books, 7 in total. I think I paid a fiver for them
 

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