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New BBC NI programme - 21 Feb @ 2100

#6
It looks like it's more through the eyes of the participants rather than a journalist making a documentary. On the trailer a squaddie bought a video camera on his NAFFI card ( must have cost him a fortune!) and recorded his mobile patrols and life on base. Should bring back a few memories.
 
#8
It looks like it's more through the eyes of the participants rather than a journalist making a documentary. On the trailer a squaddie bought a video camera on his NAFFI card ( must have cost him a fortune!) and recorded his mobile patrols and life on base. Should bring back a few memories.
One would assume from later Banner tours otherwise he'd be lugging about a Delboy special stuck to his shoulder (very large NSN unknown)? I'd like to see footage from the toms POV form the 70s & 80s.
 

overopensights

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Book Reviewer
#9
One would assume from later Banner tours otherwise he'd be lugging about a Delboy special stuck to his shoulder (very large NSN unknown)? I'd like to see footage from the toms POV form the 70s & 80s.
I was nearly seven years from time to time on Banner, after 1980 I sort have got the feeling it was all but over! The Disco tours were the days, I have a memory of watching a soldier shag a local bird over the 'unloading bay' with her hair in the sand. I would have missed that bit of nostalgia, but for the automatic light which showed his 'activity of hearts and minds'
 
#10
One would assume from later Banner tours otherwise he'd be lugging about a Delboy special stuck to his shoulder (very large NSN unknown)? I'd like to see footage from the toms POV form the 70s & 80s.
I'd have thought so, earlier ones would not have been easy to conceal from the CoC. Hopefully it'll be an interesting view.
 
#11
I was nearly seven years from time to time on Banner, after 1980 I sort have got the feeling it was all but over! The Disco tours were the days, I have a memory of watching a soldier shag a local bird over the 'unloading bay' with her hair in the sand. I would have missed that bit of nostalgia, but for the automatic light which showed his 'activity of hearts and minds'
I did my time over there early to mid 80's & there were a fair few hairy times. Post brighton bombing & maggies taking the gloves off was interesting & caused a few ding dongs.
 
#12
I was nearly seven years from time to time on Banner, after 1980 I sort have got the feeling it was all but over!
Clearly a natural optimist.

I was based in Palace Bks between 1979 and 1981 (we left just before Bobby Sands won Slimmer of the Year), and I didn't share your optimism at the end of that time.

My final day on ops in NI was in Nov 1991.

The ATO on that day got a gong, for manually extracting from a culvert, some 300lbs of HME, which had been planted in the expectation that I would site my Cordon CP (covering the RE extraction) in exactly the same place used by the Cordon comd who covered the RE insertion a few days earlier.


That, combined with their tactic du jour of demolishing entire pubs with truck bombs laden with hundreds of kg of ANIS didn't leave me feeling like it was all over.
 
#13
The thing is, it isnt over even now the boyos are still terrorising the locals on both sides and its more about Drugs and Extortion and Money now days with the occasional gun or bomb attack.
 
#14
The thing is, it isnt over even now the boyos are still terrorising the locals on both sides and its more about Drugs and Extortion and Money now days with the occasional gun or bomb attack.
NoNoNoNoNo.

That's what used to be termed Ordinary Decent Crime, back in the day.

It's the 21st Century edition of 'Normal for Norn Iron'

The fact that PIRA violence created conditions of widespread lawlessness in which - for the better part of 3 decades - nasty bastards like (allegedly) Slab Murphy might pass off their (alleged) criminal activities as 'legitimate political acts', and the fact that similar criminal acts continue post-agreement should not be conflated to suggest that there's any kind of competently-planned and organised campaign of Republican political violence ongoing in the province.

It's simply a place with two spiteful, ignorant and potentially violent tribal cultures at loggerheads with one another, as they have been for centuries, with a thriving organised crime economy as a legacy of The Troubles, much as the lawlessness ensuing Prohibition in 1920s America created conditions in which those minded to do so could lay the foundations for organised crime dynasties lasting generations.
 
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overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#15
Just one bit of lawlessness that I remember was the early 1970s when you would see electric cables fixed to an electric pole in a street and some of the street having free electricity from it. Three bar electric fires in a some of the houses. I remember placing this on a patrol report, and as Stonker has mentioned about 'honest crime,' my company commander said the same. "Leave it, it's ordinary crime and nothing whatever to do with us"
 
#16
Just one bit of lawlessness that I remember was the early 1970s when you would see electric cables fixed to an electric pole in a street and most of the street having free electricity from it. Three bar electric fires in most houses. I remember placing this on a patrol report, and as Stonker has mentioned about 'honest crime,' my company commander said the same. "Leave it, it's ordinary crime and nothing whatever to do with us"
Was that before or after the No Go Areas and Op MOTORMAN that did away with them?

There were shedloads of laws being flouted even after MOTORMAN - hence the unlicensed shebeens in Andytown, known as the PDF Club and the LESA, tolerated by the Army, pending the restoration of Police authority in the area. I don't think they were still functioning in 1979.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#17
Was that before or after the No Go Areas and Op MOTORMAN that did away with them?

There were shedloads of laws being flouted even after MOTORMAN - hence the unlicensed shebeens in Andytown, known as the PDF Club and the LESA, tolerated by the Army, pending the restoration of Police authority in the area. I don't think they were still functioning in 1979.
This was early 1970s, it was obvious that the 'Tap in's' to the grid was done professionally by local sympathetic electricians. The other law breakers were unlicensed taxi's and car tax dodgers. Except for the taxis which was a security problem to us, we ignored most things. The drinking clubs kept them off the streets. I pushed my head into one of these small drinking clubs one night and stared into about ten unsmiling faces, one drinker shouted to me, " Underprivileged people that's what we are!" There was a very fat middle aged blond woman sitting among them. I shouted back "Underprivileged are you! I wish I had a night off, some booze and a blond for the night!" I could hear them laughing for some time after I left. The Irish certainly had a sense of humour.
 
#19
NoNoNoNoNo.

That's what used to be termed Ordinary Decent Crime, back in the day.

It's the 21st Century edition of 'Normal for Norn Iron'

The fact that PIRA violence created conditions of widespread lawlessness in which - for the better part of 3 decades - nasty bastards like (allegedly) Slab Murphy might pass off their (alleged) criminal activities as 'legitimate political acts', and the fact that similar criminal acts continue post-agreement should not be conflated to suggest that there's any kind of competently-planned and organised campaign of Republican political violence ongoing in the province.

It's simply a place with two spiteful, ignorant and potentially violent tribal cultures at loggerheads with one another, as they have been for centuries, with a thriving organised crime economy as a legacy of The Troubles, much as the lawlessness ensuing Prohibition in 1920s America created conditions in which those minded to do so could lay the foundations for organised crime dynasties lasting generations.
Isnt that what i said :)
 

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