New Army recruitment campaign

On the other hand they are likely to have teenagers at university mixing with all sorts of similar types from around the world and have a reasonably good understanding if they're sufficiently curious.
Thats right because a bunch of kids at university with fairly well off parents having probably grown up in boarding schools with other children of fairly well off parents are exactly the same as Wayne from Moss side who you want in the infantry bayoneting her majestys enemies in the face.
 
No, but it would be an option on exercise if the rest were taking a ten minute breather for a brew.
Correct, it might be. Although i can tell you right now, it's highly unlikely they would all be sat around being quiet while Mohamed got on with his praying. It's also not ever guaranteed. You can do what the **** you like in your time.
But that's not what the adverts alluded to is it? The Army blatantly bullshitted.
 
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On the other hand they are likely to have teenagers at university mixing with all sorts of similar types from around the world and have a reasonably good understanding if they're sufficiently curious.
They will not acquire the necessary skills to take on Harriet Harman and those like her by chatting to their teenage undergraduate progeny. They need to understand the game, how it's played and who's playing it.

Anton Walbrook captures the problem rather nicely in 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp' (for the impatient, round about minute 4:00 is where they get to the meat).

 
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They have it in their power to stop treating serving soldiers like cnuts.
They wouldnt have half the problems with recruiting if they could sort out retention.
I broadly agree but, in the interests of fairness, I would point out that once a CYA environment is created, it requires a superhuman effort to resist it and the MOD is the moral courage vacuum at the heart of much that's going wrong. It's a Public Sector problem and, though distanced in the past, the armed forces have found themselves assimilated to an unfortunate degree. Heaven help anyone who deviates from process or makes waves in any way.
 
I'm at least with you on this, if little else. It's a uniquely British trait which is incredibly short-sighted if you aim to influence others by training or working alongside them.
Henley Business School or Cranfield? No idea where you dreamt that up from.

He got his BSc from the University of Reading before joining the Army and his MSc and MA from King's College, London.
Henley Business School is part of the University of Reading.

| Henley Business School

Why are you even bothering?
 
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They will not acquire the necessary skills to take on Harriet Harman and those like her by chatting to their teenage undergraduate progeny. They need to understand the game, how it's played and who's playing it.

Anton Walbrook captures the problem rather nicely in 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp' (for the impatient, round about minute 4:00 is where they get to the meat).

How wonderful, yet another WW2 reference. Would you explain the relevance to the current debate?
 
I seem to remember it was Basic rather than Colloquial. Still a typically British failure in my view.

ie Level 1111 in Stanag 6001. Happy to be corrected by those in the know. Actually there may have ben a couple of zeroes in the requirement, too.
I can't see why the failure to acquire a basic grasp of a second language is a failure; "Monsieur Marsaud est dans la forêt avec son chien" is of limited military utility whilst being distinctly dangerous if it's the high watermark of communication between officers.
 
Correct, it might be. Although i can tell you right now, it's highly unlikely they would all be sat around being quiet while Mohamed got on with his praying. It's also not ever guaranteed. You can do what the **** you like in your time.
But that's not what the adverts alluded to is it? The Army blatantly bullshitted.
Was the bullshit any different from the Frank campaign which suggested that soldiers had the pick of fit, sexy women when the reality was the only lay most got near was sloppy seconds from the Squadron bike?

All adverts allude; they create an image that conveys a message. They don’t have to be be spot on accurate; they’re not documentaries. They don’t create a contract that has to be fulfilled; all they do is attract interest and that only goes as far as the call to action in the ad.

The message that the patrol prayer ad delivers is that the Army is a place of religious tolerance that welcomes people of all faiths without judgement. So faith is not a reason not to join. Only the terminally dim would conclude that it means that patrols stop for prayer.

Whether it was a success or not can only be easily proven by ad tracking.
 
I can't see why the failure to acquire a basic grasp of a second language is a failure; "Monsieur Marsaud est dans la forêt avec son chien" is of limited military utility whilst being distinctly dangerous if it's the high watermark of communication between officers.
Yes, but it does provide a foot in the door. I think it was Mandela who said something along these lines:

'Speak to a man in a language he understands and you speak to his head, but speak to him in his own language and you speak to his heart.'

In my experience that removes at least half of the potential conflict. Even more if you can provide a twinkle in your eye.
 
Was the bullshit any different from the Frank campaign which suggested that soldiers had the pick of fit, sexy women when the reality was the only lay most got near was sloppy seconds from the Squadron bike?

All adverts allude; they create an image that conveys a message. They don’t have to be be spot on accurate; they’re not documentaries. They don’t create a contract that has to be fulfilled; all they do is attract interest and that only goes as far as the call to action in the ad.

The message that the patrol prayer ad delivers is that the Army is a place of religious tolerance that welcomes people of all faiths without judgement. So faith is not a reason not to join. Only the terminally dim would conclude that it means that patrols stop for prayer.

Whether it was a success or not can only be easily proven by ad tracking.
Of course its different, the franks advert really did happen in real life, it was just rare.

The Muslim ad indicated to devout Muslims (and everyone else watching) that they could stop an infantry patrol to have a quick prayer and all members of the patrol would sit quietly while this is going on. Its utter shite, a blatant lie aimed minorities.

Faith most certainly is a reason not to join, as shown on the SAS program the other day when the Muslim quit almost straight away rather than share accommodation and ablutions with the bints.

As for the terminally dim you arrogant ******* prick, civvies wouldnt know any better would they? A bit like you thinking subsidised accommodation is somehow fantastic.
 
Yes, but it does provide a foot in the door. I think it was Mandela who said something along these lines:

'Speak to a man in a language he understands and you speak to his head, but speak to him in his own language and you speak to his heart.'

In my experience that removes at least half of the potential conflict. Even more if you can provide a twinkle in your eye.
Advice from a terrorist is all well and good, the problem with learning a second language is there seemed to be a bit of confusion on which ones to learn and how practical it would be.
 
Henley Business School is part of the University of Reading.

| Henley Business School
If you think a 'degree' from Henley Business School, or any of the ex-polys or business colleges that are now faculties of recognised unis, has the same value as a degree from the university proper then you're either naive, delusional or just plain stupid.

If you'd taken the trouble to look up the BSc in Leadership and Strategic Studies from Henley Business School on the University of Reading's site you'd see that it's not even listed in the 350 courses available.
Why are you even bothering?
Because you're pretending to know what you're talking about, and probably genuinely believe you do, while posting information which is just plain wrong.
 
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Advice from a terrorist is all well and good, the problem with learning a second language is there seemed to be a bit of confusion on which ones to learn and how practical it would be.
Merely having the brain to learn a couple of languages is useful. The specific ones required is certainly a separate question, however it is always practical and useful. An old mucker (Trusted Mole) turned out to be one of a couple Serbo-Croat speakers the Army had up its sleeve in 1993. There weren't many Spanish speakers in 1982 either.

Which languages do you have? And where do you think HM Forces will deploy next?
 
If you think a 'degree' from Henley Business School, or any of the ex-polys or business colleges that are now faculties of recognised unis, has the same value as a degree from the university proper then you're either naive, delusional or just plain stupid.

If you'd taken the trouble to look up the BSc in Leadership and Strategic Studies from Henley Business School on the University of Reading's site you'd see that it's not even listed in the 350 courses available.
Because you're pretending to know what you're talkung about, and probably genuinely believe you do, while posting information which is just plain wrong.
My missus set it up.

You rather out of date silly billy.
 
How wonderful, yet another WW2 reference. Would you explain the relevance to the current debate?
Why? Do you need help to extract Theo Kretshmar-Schuldorff's critique of Wynne-Candy's upbringing and why it distorts his view of the world, from three minutes of dialogue devoted solely to the topic, and then relate it to the current discussion about the possible socially-generated blind spots of the current CoC?

By the way, another theme of the "WW2 reference" focuses on the outlook of professional soldiers versus the outlook of the wider public, but then it was, and remains, a remarkable film:

Michael Powell once said of The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp that it is... a 100% British film but it's photographed by a Frenchman, it's written by a Hungarian, the musical score is by a German Jew, the director was English, the man who did the costumes was a Czech; in other words, it was the kind of film that I've always worked on with a mixed crew of every nationality, no frontiers of any kind."

I enclose a link to Wikipedia

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp - Wikipedia

The conclusion reads:

Although the film is strongly pro-British, it is a satire on the British Army, especially its leadership. It suggests that Britain faced the option of following traditional notions of honourable warfare or to "fight dirty" in the face of such an evil enemy as Nazi Germany.[16][17] There is also a certain similarity between Candy and Churchill and some historians have suggested that Churchill may have wanted the production stopped because he had mistaken the film for a parody of himself (he had himself served in the Boer War and the First World War).[18][19] Churchill's exact reasons remain unclear, but he was acting only on a description of the planned film from his staff, not on a viewing of the film itself.

Since the highly successful re-release of the film in the 1980s, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp has been re-evaluated.[20] The film is praised for its dazzling Technicolor cinematography (which, with later films such as The Red Shoes and Black Narcissus, would become The Archers' greatest legacy), the performances by the lead actors as well as for transforming, in Roger Ebert's words; "a blustering, pigheaded caricature into one of the most loved of all movie characters".[21] David Mamet has written: "My idea of perfection is Roger Livesey (my favorite actor) in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (my favorite film) about to fight Anton Walbrook (my other favorite actor)."[22] Stephen Fry saw the film as addressing "what it means to be English", and praised it for the bravery of taking a "longer view of history" in 1943.[23] Anthony Lane of the New Yorker said in 1995 that the film "may be the greatest English film ever made, not least because it looks so closely at the incurable condition of being English".[24]

The film appears in Empire's list of The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time at number 80


(although Brotherton Lad only knows it as a WW2 reference (F_F edit)).












.
 
Why? Do you need help to extract Theo Kretshmar-Schuldorff's critique of Wynne-Candy's upbringing and why it distorts his view of the world, from three minutes of dialogue devoted solely to the topic, and then relate it to the current discussion about the possible socially-generated blind spots of the current CoC?

By the way, another theme of the "WW2 reference" focuses on the outlook of professional soldiers versus the outlook of the wider public, but then it was, and remains, a remarkable film:

Michael Powell once said of The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp that it is... a 100% British film but it's photographed by a Frenchman, it's written by a Hungarian, the musical score is by a German Jew, the director was English, the man who did the costumes was a Czech; in other words, it was the kind of film that I've always worked on with a mixed crew of every nationality, no frontiers of any kind."

I enclose a link to Wikipedia

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp - Wikipedia

The conclusion reads:

Although the film is strongly pro-British, it is a satire on the British Army, especially its leadership. It suggests that Britain faced the option of following traditional notions of honourable warfare or to "fight dirty" in the face of such an evil enemy as Nazi Germany.[16][17] There is also a certain similarity between Candy and Churchill and some historians have suggested that Churchill may have wanted the production stopped because he had mistaken the film for a parody of himself (he had himself served in the Boer War and the First World War).[18][19] Churchill's exact reasons remain unclear, but he was acting only on a description of the planned film from his staff, not on a viewing of the film itself.

Since the highly successful re-release of the film in the 1980s, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp has been re-evaluated.[20] The film is praised for its dazzling Technicolor cinematography (which, with later films such as The Red Shoes and Black Narcissus, would become The Archers' greatest legacy), the performances by the lead actors as well as for transforming, in Roger Ebert's words; "a blustering, pigheaded caricature into one of the most loved of all movie characters".[21] David Mamet has written: "My idea of perfection is Roger Livesey (my favorite actor) in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (my favorite film) about to fight Anton Walbrook (my other favorite actor)."[22] Stephen Fry saw the film as addressing "what it means to be English", and praised it for the bravery of taking a "longer view of history" in 1943.[23] Anthony Lane of the New Yorker said in 1995 that the film "may be the greatest English film ever made, not least because it looks so closely at the incurable condition of being English".[24]

The film appears in Empire's list of The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time at number 80

(although Brotherton Lad only knows it as a WW2 reference (F_F edit)).












.
I know.
 
The Muslim ad indicated to devout Muslims (and everyone else watching) that they could stop an infantry patrol to have a quick prayer and all members of the patrol would sit quietly while this is going on. Its utter shite..........As for the terminally dim you arrogant ******* prick, civvies wouldnt know any better would they? A bit like you thinking subsidised accommodation is somehow fantastic.
Only the terminally dim would watch an advert and think it creates an entitlement. Watch it with an open mind and apply some critical thinking to work out what the message is supposed to be.

And no, I’ve never suggested that subsidised accommodation is somehow fantastic; I said it is part of an attractive package. If sunsidised accomodation has no recruiting or retention value, then it should be got rid of. Your response was to that removing subsided accommodation would cause people to leave. So subsidised accommodation must have an attraction.

And you are terminally dim. And I’m only responding to your constant chippy ad hominem posting.
 

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