New Army recruitment campaign

"Regular soldier Basic Training Starts by 31 March 2021, the Army is shortening some non-Infantry courses (primarily by increasing the length of the training day and by training over some weekends) "

It's almost as if they have looked and seen what the reserves do! How many other courses are 3 days work crammed into 5?
 

marabout

Old-Salt
The last 3 years of recruitment has been turgid. DRS, rubbish if any adverts, leaving significant shortfalls in junior manning. Coupled with a perceived lack of purpose and interesting tours, the numbers joining has been woeful. Last year something went a little better, but the army only nearly hit the annual target. What it didn't do was make that target one that refilled the junior ranks from the shortfall in the proceeding two years.

Units are still short, and will be for a considerable period of time. The training pipeline is much thinner, producing a lower capacity this year. If we are lucky, and there is no 2nd wave come autumn, but if there is, recruiting will come to a grinding halt once again.

The structural gapping produced from the last 3 years will be felt for years to come.
 
Genuine question here, why does training take so long?
I joined in 1971, originally in RCT, where basic was 6 weeks of drill, weapon training, fieldcraft and PT. Weapon training was only that rifle and lmg.
Those that survived 6 weeks passed out of basic, and moved to trade training, another 6 weeks.
I later transferred, and on an early range day was given a smg. Pointing out I'd never been taught it, I got a hasty session on safe handling, and successfully passed the shoot.
Similarly, later again, the 9mm Browning pistol learnt in a couple of hours, well enough to go on as part of a battalion shooting team.

I accept that infantry do more in depth training ( and tend to be a bit thick too), but how on earth does it take so long nowadays?
 
Genuine question here, why does training take so long?
I joined in 1971, originally in RCT, where basic was 6 weeks of drill, weapon training, fieldcraft and PT. Weapon training was only that rifle and lmg.
Those that survived 6 weeks passed out of basic, and moved to trade training, another 6 weeks.
I later transferred, and on an early range day was given a smg. Pointing out I'd never been taught it, I got a hasty session on safe handling, and successfully passed the shoot.
Similarly, later again, the 9mm Browning pistol learnt in a couple of hours, well enough to go on as part of a battalion shooting team.

I accept that infantry do more in depth training ( and tend to be a bit thick too), but how on earth does it take so long nowadays?
Infantry training was twenty weeks when I did it in the eighties. It was seven weeks before we even passed of the square, and got our regimental berets. Two field exercises in that time, about ten days total. Another two, seven day exercises (patrol and trench week) then a three week battle camp. A lot of weapons and shooting as well, including GPMG and SMG.
I am told it now includes adventure training and battlefield tours.
The job of the infantry is to fight the enemy. Six weeks is not long enough to learn how to do that.
 
Infantry training was twenty weeks when I did it in the eighties. It was seven weeks before we even passed of the square, and got our regimental berets. Two field exercises in that time, about ten days total. Another two, seven day exercises (patrol and trench week) then a three week battle camp. A lot of weapons and shooting as well, including GPMG and SMG.
I am told it now includes adventure training and battlefield tours.
The job of the infantry is to fight the enemy. Six weeks is not long enough to learn how to do that.
But you passed out/ off after 7 weeks? Which is what I'd label " basic" training.
The rest, trade, special to arm, more intensive, specialist, etc is all building experience, ability and so on, but it isn't " basic".
 
But you passed out/ off after 7 weeks? Which is what I'd label " basic" training.
The rest, trade, special to arm, more intensive, specialist, etc is all building experience, ability and so on, but it isn't " basic".
After seven weeks we were allowed to wear our berets. That's all. In no way were we infantry soldiers. I wouldn't call it 'basic training' either because in Britain we call it 'recruit training'. Americans do 'basic'.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
If all else fails we could brimg back rape pillage and looting the Long Boats were always fully manned


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Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Genuine question here, why does training take so long?
I joined in 1971, originally in RCT, where basic was 6 weeks of drill, weapon training, fieldcraft and PT. Weapon training was only that rifle and lmg.
Those that survived 6 weeks passed out of basic, and moved to trade training, another 6 weeks.
I later transferred, and on an early range day was given a smg. Pointing out I'd never been taught it, I got a hasty session on safe handling, and successfully passed the shoot.
Similarly, later again, the 9mm Browning pistol learnt in a couple of hours, well enough to go on as part of a battalion shooting team.

I accept that infantry do more in depth training ( and tend to be a bit thick too), but how on earth does it take so long nowadays?

There's so much more technology to learn now and more education. Even 25 years ago, what you call 'basic' was extended from 10 weeks to 13, plus a similar length of time for what you call 'trade'. Or Phase 1 and Phase 2 in the jargon of the time. Phase 3 was what you did later in your career.

Interestingly, the jargon is now basic training, initial trade training and trade training.

To put soldier training in perspective, basic training for officers is 44 weeks, initial trade training anything from 3 months or longer (depending on cap-badge) and trade training never stops.

At the extreme end of the spectrum initial trade training for AAC pilots is over 3 years.

 
Last edited:
Sandhurst applications from graduates are up .
From the Telegraph
Sandhurst sees surge in applications as downturn in jobs market sends more graduates to Army
General Lord Dannatt said it was not 'surprising' applications had risen in the year the world comes to terms with coronavirus

ByDanielle Sheridan, POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT7 August 2020 • 9:30pm

Next week potential recruits will have the first ever live zoom tour of Sandhurst

Next week potential recruits will have the first ever live zoom tour of Sandhurst

Sandhurst has seen a surge in applications this year as the former head of the army said a downturn in the jobs market has made more graduates consider serving with the British Army.
The Daily Telegraph understands that applications for officer entry at the Royal Military Academy rose by 62 per cent compared to last year, with overall applications for soldiers and officers combined up by 32 per cent.
General Lord Dannatt, former chief of the general staff, told this newspaper that it was not “surprising” applications had risen in the year the world comes to terms with the coronavirus pandemic.
“The fact there is a 62 per cent increase is largely down to a lot of young people leaving university, majority are graduates, they'll have looked at career possibilities and realised the army is a good option when other opportunities aren't looking promising, I'm not surprised,” Lord Dannatt said.
“We know a lot of businesses will struggle once the furlough scheme ends and there will be a reduced number of jobs for graduates in the labour market, but the Army always needs a healthy intake of qualified people so why wouldn't they apply? A year developing your leadership skills is something special.”

It comes as Sandhurst prepares to host its first ever virtual insight day next week.
An army source said that the event, which will be held on Zoom on August 12, looks set to have 1000 potential recruits logging on to join in a live tour of the gym and speak to serving officers about life at the academy, as well as commanders.
The last physical insight day Sandhurst held had 560 people attend, of which 358 were potential recruits and 202 parents and guardians.
“This year we expect to hit the 1,000 people limit on the virtual insight day,” the source added.
“They may also have mums and dads sat around the laptop with them, so this figure is quite incredible. It shows how we are adapting to the covid challenge.”
 
Sandhurst applications from graduates are up .
From the Telegraph
Sandhurst sees surge in applications as downturn in jobs market sends more graduates to Army
General Lord Dannatt said it was not 'surprising' applications had risen in the year the world comes to terms with coronavirus

ByDanielle Sheridan, POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT7 August 2020 • 9:30pm

Next week potential recruits will have the first ever live zoom tour of Sandhurst

Next week potential recruits will have the first ever live zoom tour of Sandhurst

Sandhurst has seen a surge in applications this year as the former head of the army said a downturn in the jobs market has made more graduates consider serving with the British Army.
The Daily Telegraph understands that applications for officer entry at the Royal Military Academy rose by 62 per cent compared to last year, with overall applications for soldiers and officers combined up by 32 per cent.
General Lord Dannatt, former chief of the general staff, told this newspaper that it was not “surprising” applications had risen in the year the world comes to terms with the coronavirus pandemic.
“The fact there is a 62 per cent increase is largely down to a lot of young people leaving university, majority are graduates, they'll have looked at career possibilities and realised the army is a good option when other opportunities aren't looking promising, I'm not surprised,” Lord Dannatt said.
“We know a lot of businesses will struggle once the furlough scheme ends and there will be a reduced number of jobs for graduates in the labour market, but the Army always needs a healthy intake of qualified people so why wouldn't they apply? A year developing your leadership skills is something special.”

It comes as Sandhurst prepares to host its first ever virtual insight day next week.
An army source said that the event, which will be held on Zoom on August 12, looks set to have 1000 potential recruits logging on to join in a live tour of the gym and speak to serving officers about life at the academy, as well as commanders.
The last physical insight day Sandhurst held had 560 people attend, of which 358 were potential recruits and 202 parents and guardians.
“This year we expect to hit the 1,000 people limit on the virtual insight day,” the source added.
“They may also have mums and dads sat around the laptop with them, so this figure is quite incredible. It shows how we are adapting to the covid challenge.”
R Signals seems to have a glut at the moment and not a question is asked about who is paying for them. Basically we're overborne and that's fine but when you want an uplift of worker bees (as opposed to blokes to organise AT when COVID is on) there's no money.
 
There's so much more technology to learn now and more education. Even 25 years ago, what you call 'basic' was extended from 10 weeks to 13, plus a similar length of time for what you call 'trade'. Or Phase 1 and Phase 2 in the jargon of the time. Phase 3 was what you did later in your career.

Interestingly, the jargon is now basic training, initial trade training and trade training.

To put soldier training in perspective, basic training for officers is 44 weeks, initial trade training anything from 3 months or longer (depending on cap-badge) and trade training never stops.

At the extreme end of the spectrum initial trade training for AAC pilots is over 3 years.

Training from the day you arrive until you get to your first unit, and even then you are still Nigtatstic.

A Para takes 33 weeks, RM 32 weeks, VM 60 weeks... just as an example.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Training from the day you arrive until you get to your first unit, and even then you are still Nigtatstic.

A Para takes 33 weeks, RM 32 weeks, VM 60 weeks... just as an example.

My son has just gone through 44 weeks of training. He has 14 more weeks to do before the Army will trust him with 30 soldiers.
 
My son has just gone through 44 weeks of training. He has 14 more pleasurable weeks in the glorious South Wales countryside weeks to do before the Army will trust him with 30 soldiers.
FOC
 
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