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New Army recruitment campaign

Are we only defining snowflakes as people who joined because of that advert?

Ok then.
The current adverts are aimed at snowflakes.
 
Sure. But that term has been I use since about 1996.
The point is that recruitment is up by targeting those who may not be best suited for the Army.
 
I don’t think they are targeting bed wetting old men yet.

No, no no, they were all SF back in the day, the age old, not as good as in m6 day argument, this current batch will be saying the same in 10 years ^~
 
No, no no, they were all SF back in the day, the age old, not as good as in m6 day argument, this current batch will be saying the same in 10 years ^~

You equate the ability to run a mile and half in 10.30 with SF? I know you are a scouser, but I didnt think you standards were that low.
 
You equate the ability to run a mile and half in 10.30 with SF? I know you are a scouser, but I didnt think you standards were that low.


I am really not bothered if people can run a mile and a half in 10:30. I have known loads of racing snakes shit a brick as soon as they put a bit of weight on their back and I have seen bigger lads who aren’t so good at the running carry hundreds of rounds of link as well as the GPMG.
 
I am really not bothered if people can run a mile and a half in 10:30. I have known loads of racing snakes shit a brick as soon as they put a bit of weight on their back and I have seen bigger lads who aren’t so good at the running carry hundreds of rounds of link as well as the GPMG.
The point was it used to be a test to pass out. It isn't now. Some how that means it was like being inbthe SF in the past.

Also you don't have to be a "racing snake" to manage a mile and a half in in 10.30.
 

mcphee1948

War Hero
Don't you think that all these adverts for joining the Army, have at the back of them, a fatal flaw.

Which is this - no other career choice involves getting yourself into a job where you might get shot.
 
Published by: George Allison, UK DEFENCE JOURNAL, on 03 July 2020.

British Army recruitment hits 96% of target

This marks the most successful recruiting year in 5 years and significantly exceeds the 80% target given by the Public Accounts Committee in January 2019, say the Ministry of Defence.


The Ministry of Defence have provided an update on progress on the priorities set by the Secretary of State for each of the Service Chiefs and whether these have changed due to, or been impacted by, the Covid-19 pandemic, the following outlines the Secretary of State’s priority for the Army and the progress made towards them.

The following response was published today as a response from the Ministry of Defence to follow-up questions to the Defence Secretary following a session of the Defence Committee on the 23rd April.

“A successful recruiting year combined with a revised, programmatic approach to retention is starting to yield positive results. As at 1 April 2020 the Army’s Full Time Trained Strength was 79,010 (+310 since 1 October 2019) and the Full Time Trade Trained Strength was 73,720 (+50 since 1 January 2020). Regular Workforce Growth has remained a priority for the Army throughout the COVID-19 period, building on the positive gains on both inflow and retention achieved during 19/20.

During recruiting year 2019/20, the Regular Soldier intake to the Untrained Army was 9,067, achieving 96% of the end of year target. This marks the most successful recruiting year in 5 years and significantly exceeds the 80% target given by the Public Accounts Committee in January 2019. Of note, the number of candidates loaded to Basic Training courses surpassed the target set and the shortfall in Basic Training Starts was only due to the final intakes of the recruiting year being postponed due to Covid-19. The Army also exceeded the Direct Entry Officer target of 620.

The Army lost approximately five training weeks between pausing non-essential activity and restarting Basic Training on 11 May 20. At present, Basic Training is constrained to around 50% of capacity by social distancing and other Force Health Protection measures. Current planning assumes we will not return to full loading until at least September. In order to achieve the planned 9,867 Regular soldier Basic Training Starts by 31 March 2021, the Army is shortening some non-Infantry courses (primarily by increasing the length of the training day and by training over some weekends) and maximising the use of available accommodation. Officer Training resumed at Sandhurst from 17 May, achieving full capacity a week later primarily because individual rooms support increased social distancing. With some minor changes to course construct, Regular and Reserve Officer training remains on target.

Plans to restart face to face recruitment are progressing. Applicants to join the Army are completing much more of their application online, with virtual support provided by both military and civilian recruiters. Although it is too early to assess whether this change in approach is affecting candidates’ success in getting through the pipeline, initial feedback has been positive and early indications are that applications are notably higher that at the same time last year. Recruitment processes will continue to be reviewed and improved to incorporate any lessons learned from virtual activity during lockdown. All Assessment Centres have now reopened, albeit at reduced capacity, with plans being developed to increase that capacity as soon as possible.

Prior to COVID-19 the Voluntary Outflow (VO) rate for soldiers had decreased from a peak of 6.9% to 6.7%. The Army continues to aim to reduce Involuntary Outflow (IVO) through medical and discipline and has reduced Other Rank Medical IVO from 2.1% to 1.4% in the last 12 months.

In response to COVID-19 the Army rapidly introduced a number of measures to retain service personnel for longer. Measures included enabling Notice to Terminate (NTT) and Premature Voluntary Retirement (PVR) withdrawals and extension of service where requested. It is too soon to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the Army’s Workforce Strength in the long-term but early indicators suggest a decrease in Notice to Terminate (NTT) submissions and an increase in NTT withdrawals and extension requests which are likely to reduce VO in the short term.”


 
Published by: George Allison, UK DEFENCE JOURNAL, on 03 July 2020.

British Army recruitment hits 96% of target

This marks the most successful recruiting year in 5 years and significantly exceeds the 80% target given by the Public Accounts Committee in January 2019, say the Ministry of Defence.


The Ministry of Defence have provided an update on progress on the priorities set by the Secretary of State for each of the Service Chiefs and whether these have changed due to, or been impacted by, the Covid-19 pandemic, the following outlines the Secretary of State’s priority for the Army and the progress made towards them.

The following response was published today as a response from the Ministry of Defence to follow-up questions to the Defence Secretary following a session of the Defence Committee on the 23rd April.

“A successful recruiting year combined with a revised, programmatic approach to retention is starting to yield positive results. As at 1 April 2020 the Army’s Full Time Trained Strength was 79,010 (+310 since 1 October 2019) and the Full Time Trade Trained Strength was 73,720 (+50 since 1 January 2020). Regular Workforce Growth has remained a priority for the Army throughout the COVID-19 period, building on the positive gains on both inflow and retention achieved during 19/20.

During recruiting year 2019/20, the Regular Soldier intake to the Untrained Army was 9,067, achieving 96% of the end of year target. This marks the most successful recruiting year in 5 years and significantly exceeds the 80% target given by the Public Accounts Committee in January 2019. Of note, the number of candidates loaded to Basic Training courses surpassed the target set and the shortfall in Basic Training Starts was only due to the final intakes of the recruiting year being postponed due to Covid-19. The Army also exceeded the Direct Entry Officer target of 620.

The Army lost approximately five training weeks between pausing non-essential activity and restarting Basic Training on 11 May 20. At present, Basic Training is constrained to around 50% of capacity by social distancing and other Force Health Protection measures. Current planning assumes we will not return to full loading until at least September. In order to achieve the planned 9,867 Regular soldier Basic Training Starts by 31 March 2021, the Army is shortening some non-Infantry courses (primarily by increasing the length of the training day and by training over some weekends) and maximising the use of available accommodation. Officer Training resumed at Sandhurst from 17 May, achieving full capacity a week later primarily because individual rooms support increased social distancing. With some minor changes to course construct, Regular and Reserve Officer training remains on target.

Plans to restart face to face recruitment are progressing. Applicants to join the Army are completing much more of their application online, with virtual support provided by both military and civilian recruiters. Although it is too early to assess whether this change in approach is affecting candidates’ success in getting through the pipeline, initial feedback has been positive and early indications are that applications are notably higher that at the same time last year. Recruitment processes will continue to be reviewed and improved to incorporate any lessons learned from virtual activity during lockdown. All Assessment Centres have now reopened, albeit at reduced capacity, with plans being developed to increase that capacity as soon as possible.

Prior to COVID-19 the Voluntary Outflow (VO) rate for soldiers had decreased from a peak of 6.9% to 6.7%. The Army continues to aim to reduce Involuntary Outflow (IVO) through medical and discipline and has reduced Other Rank Medical IVO from 2.1% to 1.4% in the last 12 months.

In response to COVID-19 the Army rapidly introduced a number of measures to retain service personnel for longer. Measures included enabling Notice to Terminate (NTT) and Premature Voluntary Retirement (PVR) withdrawals and extension of service where requested. It is too soon to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the Army’s Workforce Strength in the long-term but early indicators suggest a decrease in Notice to Terminate (NTT) submissions and an increase in NTT withdrawals and extension requests which are likely to reduce VO in the short term.”


So COVID a better recruitment & retention enabler than Capita?
 

Bob65

War Hero
As at 1 April 2020 the Army’s Full Time Trained Strength was 79,010 (+310 since 1 October 2019) and the Full Time Trade Trained Strength was 73,720 (+50 since 1 January 2020).

It's that latter number that is supposed to be 82,000, adding 50 people every 6 months means it will take around 80 years to get the Army back up to strength. Perhaps it is merely an anomaly due to COVID but that's where the Army really needs to focus.
 

NemoIII

War Hero
It's that latter number that is supposed to be 82,000, adding 50 people every 6 months

I personally know 5 Soldiers that have either signed back on or got extentions to there NTT.

I would suggest the army was in for another considerable loss if it wasn't COVID.

Least the Army doesn't have to make itself a better place to work, as the grass isn't as green as it used to be.
 
"Regular soldier Basic Training Starts by 31 March 2021, the Army is shortening some non-Infantry courses (primarily by increasing the length of the training day and by training over some weekends) "

It's almost as if they have looked and seen what the reserves do! How many other courses are 3 days work crammed into 5?
 

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