New Army recruitment campaign

I've spent several periods on ops at the end of a long and complex supply chain, and have found that stores support tends to be better than when at the end of a short simple supply chain in the UK.
Ditto. On that exped, for example, after we'd rolled one of the L Rovers into a nullah and straightened the bodywork out with a few sledgehammers and some hanging from a tree, replacement windows were purchased in the UK and brought out a couple of days later by one of the researchers coming out from the BMNH. I wonder how long that would have taken in the UK and how much paperwork would have been involved.
 
Too many rum shacks to remember but I don't think any of them were called '' Big C ''
Not my area of expertise or ops, but I'm reliably informed it was the best known whiskeria in town (but not for the whisky). One of my soldiers in the Int Cell had married one of the largest of the staff - very happily, it turned out.
 
It's their job, FFS!.
Soldier first, combat engineer second, tradesman third. The whole point of Sailfish was to provide collective training for the latter. Funnily enough Sappers tend to focus on the kinetic end of what they do.

Frankly shouting about building some low grade accomodation in a third world national park on some obscure operation that only you remember is rather laughable from the viewpoint of any Sapper who was involved in infrastructure in the Balkans, Afghanistan and Iraq.

BTW my involvement in the hangar job was pretty minor; the building was big enough to require the designs to be signed off by a qualified engineer. Me. Sneering about warped wood misses the point; a building designed to house £20M of helicopters through a hurricane has to be designed and built properly.

As I said before, I can see why someone who has spent his short life as a Sapper in combat engineering would see it as challenging. TBH it would challenge me and I’ve spent 25 years building stuff in strange places.
 
Good for you John. So you were erecting improvised accommodation. It’s rather different from building to Defence Works Standards (as they were known them), complying with CDM regulations, UK health and safety standards etc. And I somehow doubt you were installing high voltage power, installing a gantry crane, powered hangar doors and the like on Project Wallace.

The supply chain issue is significant. Constructing proper buildings to a high standard in places like Belize is challenging because you can’t nip down to your local B&Q for parts. Your logistics reach back into industry; you are coordinating with the factory. It’s good training for engineers.

@Joe_Private’s observation about logistics on operations matches mine. But Sailfish reached back into industry, not into the defence logistics system. If bits of your building miss the ship you’ve got a challenge

The Sailfish projects were selected to develop skills across the three legs of design, resource and construct. They were good exercises; just complex enough to be taxing but simple enough to be achievable.

I can see why someone who has been on what would now be called a WTE career would look back at it as a highlight. It’s probably the only real fun and freedom he’s had in his career. People who make VVSO rank don’t tend to spend time doing fun things like adventurous training.
If NAO looks into ANEMOI a few people will be sweating!
 
Was it the Army or the MODs idea to outsource recruitment?
 
Oh dear. Looks as if the Defence Committee PAC have reached their conclusion and it's not great.

Also in The Times and elsewhere.
The statement I find interesting is that Capita somehow misunderstood the complexity of the requirement. But all they could do was bid on the information provided in the Invitation to Tender and answer the myriad of clarification questions that the client will ask. They can’t make assumptions or analyse requirements that aren’t in the ITT.

The second issue is that it is the clients responsibility to ensure that any contractor they appoint understands the requirement in the ITT before award of contract.

If I was Capita I’d be looking for any and every opportunity to exploit this contract particularly if there’s a possibility of generating a revenue stream from the IT investment.
 
I note that the current recruiting drive neglects to mention the likelihood of spending some time in one of these as part of the aftercare and resettlement process:



#ThisisBelonging
 
I note that the current recruiting drive neglects to mention the likelihood of spending some time in one of these as part of the aftercare and resettlement process:



#ThisisBelonging
There were a fair few lads in my peer group that would have ended up in one eventually.

Their time in the army merely delayed or averted this fate.

I know of one lad who told his oc at a retention interview he planned to go back to his old job, in which he used make good money. This is about t here years ago.

I can only imagine the oc's expression when the lad told him he used to dabble in a bit of drug dealing... Back in Manchester.

Another lad (jnco) once told me that a lad in the regiment was a 'proper scaley' as the stories and people in his wall photos were of some of Liverpool's most known toerags... Circa 2003.

Oddly enough the scaley's nickname was 'scaley' and the other 'scouse'.

One lad turned up to day 1 of Aprentice training with me, sporting a stab injury... He stayed the course, finishing his 22 as a squadron supervisor in 264.

He became renowned for selling his leave, I think he did a week's guard on every break, and using the money to ship his girlfriend or close family to Harrogate hotels. I honestly can't say if he ever went back to whence he came.
 
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The statement I find interesting is that Capita somehow misunderstood the complexity of the requirement. But all they could do was bid on the information provided in the Invitation to Tender and answer the myriad of clarification questions that the client will ask. They can’t make assumptions or analyse requirements that aren’t in the ITT.

The second issue is that it is the clients responsibility to ensure that any contractor they appoint understands the requirement in the ITT before award of contract.

If I was Capita I’d be looking for any and every opportunity to exploit this contract particularly if there’s a possibility of generating a revenue stream from the IT investment.
From the PAC:

Report summary
In 2012, the British Army naively launched into a 10-year partnership with Capita to recruit new soldiers, thinking it could leave Capita to manage recruitment.

However, Capita entered into the contract without fully understanding the complexity of what it was taking on.
Both parties entered into an over-specified contract and then introduced changes to centralise the approach to recruitment without trialling them.

The Army and Capita also failed to simplify the recruitment approach and have only recently introduced the essential online recruitment system, over four years late.

The Army has managed the Programme passively but Capita’s performance has been abysmal since it started, and it has failed to meet the Army’s recruitment targets every single year of the contract – an unacceptable level of service delivery.

Over the last year, the Army and Capita have introduced changes to the recruitment approach, but it is too early to detect any impact on enlistments and the Army still does not expect to fully meet its recruitment targets until 2022.

We are not convinced that the Army will manage Capita strongly enough to improve performance or avoid Capita charging excessively for the continued use of the online recruitment system after 2022. We are also highly sceptical that the Army will achieve its forecast savings as a result of employing Capita.

If the contract does not deliver the anticipated savings, this waste of taxpayers’ money undermines confidence in MoD planning.

Some of the problems establishing this contract are similar to those on the MoD’s other major contract with Capita on the Defence Infrastructure Organisation, which it will end five years early due to poor performance.
We are disappointed to see the MoD replicate the contract management errors that our Committee sees all too often across government.

Pretty much conclusive proof that the Army can not produce VSOs with the necessary intellect and capability to run things in 21 Century.
 
There were a fair few lads in my peer group that would have ended up in one eventually.

Their time in the army merely delayed or averted this fate.

I know of one lad who told his oc at a retention interview he planned to go back to his old job, in which he used make good money. This is about t here years ago.

I can only imagine the oc's expression when the lad told him he used to dabble in a bit of drug dealing... Back in Manchester.

Another lad (jnco) once told me that a lad in the regiment was a 'proper scaley' as the stories and people in his wall photos were of some of Liverpool's most known toerags... Circa 2003.

Oddly enough the scaley's nickname was 'scaley' and the other 'scouse'.

One lad turned up to day 1 of Aprentice training with me, sporting a stab injury... He stayed the course, finishing his 22 as a squadron supervisor in 264.

He became renowned for selling his leave, I think he did a week's guard on every break, and using the money to ship his girlfriend or close family to Harrogate hotels. I honestly can't say if he ever went back to whence he came.
A chap arrived under a bit of a cloud at one of my postings rumoured to have done quite well redistributing diesel to the extent that he’d paid his house off with cash. He also had quite an elastic third stripe (I never saw it).
 
From the PAC:

Report summary
In 2012, the British Army naively launched into a 10-year partnership with Capita to recruit new soldiers, thinking it could leave Capita to manage recruitment.

However, Capita entered into the contract without fully understanding the complexity of what it was taking on.
Both parties entered into an over-specified contract and then introduced changes to centralise the approach to recruitment without trialling them.

The Army and Capita also failed to simplify the recruitment approach and have only recently introduced the essential online recruitment system, over four years late.

The Army has managed the Programme passively but Capita’s performance has been abysmal since it started, and it has failed to meet the Army’s recruitment targets every single year of the contract – an unacceptable level of service delivery.

Over the last year, the Army and Capita have introduced changes to the recruitment approach, but it is too early to detect any impact on enlistments and the Army still does not expect to fully meet its recruitment targets until 2022.

We are not convinced that the Army will manage Capita strongly enough to improve performance or avoid Capita charging excessively for the continued use of the online recruitment system after 2022. We are also highly sceptical that the Army will achieve its forecast savings as a result of employing Capita.

If the contract does not deliver the anticipated savings, this waste of taxpayers’ money undermines confidence in MoD planning.

Some of the problems establishing this contract are similar to those on the MoD’s other major contract with Capita on the Defence Infrastructure Organisation, which it will end five years early due to poor performance.
We are disappointed to see the MoD replicate the contract management errors that our Committee sees all too often across government.

Pretty much conclusive proof that the Army can not produce VSOs with the necessary intellect and capability to run things in 21 Century.
Stones in glass houses, I don’t think the general public are that impressed with the governments planning ability.
 
There were a fair few lads in my peer group that would have ended up in one eventually.

Their time in the army merely delayed or averted this fate.

I know of one lad who told his oc at a retention interview he planned to go back to his old job, in which he used make good money. This is about t here years ago.

I can only imagine the oc's expression when the lad told him he used to dabble in a bit of drug dealing... Back in Manchester.

Another lad (jnco) once told me that a lad in the regiment was a 'proper scaley' as the stories and people in his wall photos were of some of Liverpool's most known toerags... Circa 2003.

Oddly enough the scaley's nickname was 'scaley' and the other 'scouse'.

One lad turned up to day 1 of Aprentice training with me, sporting a stab injury... He stayed the course, finishing his 22 as a squadron supervisor in 264.

He became renowned for selling his leave, I think he did a week's guard on every break, and using the money to ship his girlfriend or close family to Harrogate hotels. I honestly can't say if he ever went back to whence he came.
None of these homely dits, I would suggest, were a direct consequence of being deployed.
 

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