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Never mind Brits in Nam- what about Yanks in the Falklands?

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#42
Mr_Deputy said:
VarSity said:
Would you go and work for the Argies back then? because I wouldn’t! That alone makes me think this story is pish!
I can see why some might want to but they would meet the following hurdles:

1. Have to speak Spanish and understand the Argie variant.
2. Not have a better job opportunity in the States
3. Face fact that the Argie govt was quite skint and may not pay up
4. Face fact that on return to the US questions may well be asked
5. Possibility of being killed in attempt by British to retake islands even if they believe General Galtieri's bull about it being a walk-over
6. Possibility of being killed by Argie 'friendly fire'
7. They could have been Argentine born American mercenaries like Gustavo Grillo of Angola fame.
 
#43
jaybee2786 said:
This little feeker spoke with a yank accent, and as you can see it took five to hold him back hard as nails
Although the penguin in question was a kind and considerate lover!
 
#44
We did find loads of personal letters from yanks to argies, and germans to argies in trenches and o.p's, and there was always rumours of some argies taken short walks of steep cliffs.


And i remember the other rumour was that the Navy were using lasor's to blind the argie pilots. Then 10 or 15 yrs later the brits signed an agreement never to use lasors to injure or blind servicemen in war.
 
#45
What about the Anglo Argentine Officers? Werent several Argie Officers found to have very British sounding double barelled names, been educated in British public schools and even some were related to officers in the UK task force?

They werent of course mercs, just young men doing there National Service for Argentina. I understand Argentina has quite a large community of British descended settlers, who maintain quite strong links with the UK to this day?

Or is this all pish fuelled by the work of fiction 'Rainbow Soldiers', by Walter Winward (Good book IMO, about a fictional regiment down south in '82)
 
#47
jaybee2786 said:
We did find loads of personal letters from yanks to argies, and germans to argies in trenches and o.p's, and there was always rumours of some argies taken short walks of steep cliffs.
There is also the fact that Argies opened fire after raising the white flag.

Why is it that we British always have to try to wash our (in this case perceived) dirty linien in public?
I doubt that the Argies/Iraqis/Taleban/AQ/IRA/PIRA/INLA or any of the others do such a thing. We certainly know the Japanese don't.
 
#48
Lewis said:
There were some Welsh from a large community in Patagonia.
I know about them, but they wouldnt speak English around any of our troops would they. They wouldnt even speak English in Sennybridge Camp NAAFI when I was there two weeks ago.

If I absolutely had to fill a mass grave on East Falkland..... :twisted:
 
#49
Markintime said:
There is also the fact that Argies opened fire after raising the white flag.

Why is it that we British always have to try to wash our (in this case perceived) dirty linien in public?
I doubt that the Argies/Iraqis/Taleban/AQ/IRA/PIRA/INLA or any of the others do such a thing. We certainly know the Japanese don't.
Because we are British and proud be so, damn it! Theres nothing more British than shooting yourself in the foot by telling tales of great feats of daring-do after a few beers or getting ones tour snaps developed at Boots.
 
#51
Rather than bringing up the old allegations that we did things outside the rules of war (and who doesn't sometimes) it may be of more relevance to look at the tactics employed against us -and learn from them!

One incident that springs to mind was the effectiveness of one Argi sniper (without spotter) armed with a rather battered Mauser K98K (cannot remember the sighting system he had) who was positioned under the water tower by the shearers accommodation at Goose Green. By all accounts he inflicted most casualties on the advancing troops once they had crested the ridge after Darwin. Even one of the Civvies commented on how good he was. As a footnote he was hit in the stomach later in the battle.

Long after the Falklands After action report was published no one above Bn level promoted any real sniper policy. Certainly a few clear thinking Units saw the continued significance of Battle group deployment of sniper assets but not all.
 
#52
Lewis said:
There were some Welsh from a large community in Patagonia.
Yup. Just looking on Google Earth now. If you view Patagonia and look for 'Rawson' (the regional capital) and follow the river valley west you will see many towns and locations with Welsh names. Indeed, many pictures posted are by 'Jones' and 'Williams' etc. Here is the Wikipedia article on it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_settlement_in_Argentina
 
#53
I heard the same story from a reasonable source - supposedly they stood up after inflicting casualities and tried to give it, "Okay, you win". The truth is probably Argentines with US accents, some perhaps maybe thinking that saying the were US citizens might be a useful tactic to get them over that tricky first five minutes.

I don't think most mercenaries would have been daft enough, or brave enough, to put themselves in that position. Alan Coren's spoof of Major Mike Hoare's address to his boys - "Remember lads, your Cuban is better armed, better trained, better led and better motivated. So if you see one I suggest you run like hell".

If a US mercenary had the misfortune to end up on the island I doubt he would have been daft enough to stay on the ground, never mind open up.
 
#54
jaybee2786 said:
And i remember the other rumour was that the Navy were using lasor's to blind the argie pilots. Then 10 or 15 yrs later the brits signed an agreement never to use lasors to injure or blind servicemen in war.
Not a rumour. The Laser Dazzle Sights got pictured in Janes after someone came in to port having forgotten to put the covers back on. Obviously, we would never be so unsporting as to blind people in contravention of the 1995 UN Protocol on Blinding Weapons, just wash out their bombsight so they couldn't aim or see straight...
 
#56
walt_of_the_walts said:
What about the Anglo Argentine Officers? Werent several Argie Officers found to have very British sounding double barelled names, been educated in British public schools and even some were related to officers in the UK task force?

They werent of course mercs, just young men doing there National Service for Argentina. I understand Argentina has quite a large community of British descended settlers, who maintain quite strong links with the UK to this day?

Or is this all pish fuelled by the work of fiction 'Rainbow Soldiers', by Walter Winward (Good book IMO, about a fictional regiment down south in '82)
Having had a look round the Argie cemetery near Goose Green, I can confirm that several gravestones had English surnames on them, no idea what rank.
 
#57
It was quite common for the well to do Argentineans to be educated in the UK. I believe some of their officers went through Sandhurst as part of some sort of Anglo Argentinean agreement!!
 
#58
Not forgetting the token Hiberno-Argentinian Major Patricio Dowling;

Major Patricio Dowling, an Argentine of Irish origin who hated all things British, became the chief of police. He frequently over-stepped his authority, ignoring instructions to treat the islanders with respect, and quickly became known throughout the islands for his tendency to resort to violence. Dowling imposed a regime of arbitrary house searches, arrests and questioning. His actions came to the attention of Commodoro Carlos Bloomer-Reeve who recommended to Brigadier-General Menéndez that he be removed and he was subsequently sent back to the mainland in disgrace.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Events_leading_to_the_Falklands_War#Life_under_the_occupation
 
#59
A certain 14/20th officer did the long equitation course of the Argentine Army whilst on an SSLC commission...didn'y you Silas?
 
#60
Drlligaf said:
walt_of_the_walts said:
What about the Anglo Argentine Officers? Werent several Argie Officers found to have very British sounding double barelled names, been educated in British public schools and even some were related to officers in the UK task force?

They werent of course mercs, just young men doing there National Service for Argentina. I understand Argentina has quite a large community of British descended settlers, who maintain quite strong links with the UK to this day?

Or is this all pish fuelled by the work of fiction 'Rainbow Soldiers', by Walter Winward (Good book IMO, about a fictional regiment down south in '82)
Having had a look round the Argie cemetery near Goose Green, I can confirm that several gravestones had English surnames on them, no idea what rank.
That is because there was/is also a big expat community there whose children grew up with brit parents, bilingual English/spanish but feeling Argentine. No surprises there. If you read the Robert Fox book Eyewitness Falklands, he talks about speaking to prisoners from welsh and british argentine communities.
Most armies have the same, I had a lad in my platoon in the 80's who was descended from the polish community, geordie as anything but his surname ended in 'ski, and my surname is catalan origen. Difficult to tell nowadays.
 

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