Networked airbags for blast protection

#1
Networked airbags for protecting skiiers against avalanches is already prior art:

Sign in to read: Networked airbag could save skiers from an avalanche - tech - 20 January 2010 - New Scientist

What do you guys think about an idea to put networked airbags on soldiers to protect them from blast injuries? The idea I also filed a patent application for was to put a pressure sensor on soldiers which detects the passage of large blast overpressures. The first to get hit by the blast overpressures may die, but at least the rest of his squad's airbags would deploy by wireless command, hopefully in time if they weren't bunched too tightly together.

Those airbags would definately work against tertiary and quaternary blast injuries (being thrown around, crushed, etc.) It would mitigate secondary and primary blast injuries (fragments and the direct effect of blast waves), to a degree that ought to be quantified experimentally. Most blast fragments/debris are ballistically inefficient and lose velocity quickly in free air.

The disadvantage of this I see is that soldiers will need to carry more kit (oh no). To reduce encumbrance the airbags need only be rated for NIJ ballistic levels of 1 - I suspect even very rudimentary ballistic protection from bullet standards will increase survivability dramatically by shrapnel/fragmentation standards. This is because a piece of shrapnel of the same mass and velocity of a bullet would have reduced armour piercing capability being either of lower density (e.g. entrained gravel) or poor geometry (spherical ball bearings vs. ogival bullet noses).
 
#3
How fast does this thing deploy? You do know what a blast pressure wave looks like?
 
#8
Who left the cage door open in the hospital for wacky inventors, you've been quiet for a bit, have the meds worn off?
 
#11
Nope. Do you have any form of relationship with the MOD.

I'm busy with a gynaecological research proposal for natalie portman
 
A

armadillo

Guest
#13
Independent Boffin, crack on Barnes Wallis and Frank Whittle were laughed out of the ministry on several occasions, Christopher cockerill was deemed a quack.

If you can design something that protects life well done and dont give up. Scientists are still trying to rediscover damascus steel.

One of my GEMs ideas was stolen by a rupert, six months later he is picking up a fat cheque, go for it.
 
#14
This sounds like a really cool idea. The shock wave from a projectile builds to a maximum in something under 1 µs, but I'm sure you've found a way of getting this thing to deploy in well under 1 ns, so no worries on that score. When your system is ready for trials, I suggest you volunteer to go point on a few patrols in Afghanistan, wearing your wonderful invention. If you don't happen to walk into an IED in the first few days, I'm sure you'll find someone who'll be happy to rig something up with a grenade and a long piece of string. We could even post the resulting video on here. You're fortune would be made!
 
#15
If you are addressing that question to me, please define a "proper job".
One in which one of 14 patents (which is no arbiter of innovation, success or originality by the way) gets off the drawing board and implemented?

Otherwise, that looks like rather a pants hitrate. I mean, if I could be arrsed, I'd probably come up with a patentworthy idea right now.
 
#16
Independent Boffin, crack on Barnes Wallis and Frank Whittle were laughed out of the ministry on several occasions, Christopher cockerill was deemed a quack.

If you can design something that protects life well done and dont give up. Scientists are still trying to rediscover damascus steel.

One of my GEMs ideas was stolen by a rupert, six months later he is picking up a fat cheque, go for it.
Thanks for the encouragement :)

This sounds like a really cool idea. The shock wave from a projectile builds to a maximum in something under 1 µs, but I'm sure you've found a way of getting this thing to deploy in well under 1 ns, so no worries on that score. When your system is ready for trials, I suggest you volunteer to go point on a few patrols in Afghanistan, wearing your wonderful invention. If you don't happen to walk into an IED in the first few days, I'm sure you'll find someone who'll be happy to rig something up with a grenade and a long piece of string. We could even post the resulting video on here. You're fortune would be made!
Assuming an airbag inflation time of 25ms and a constant blast wave velocity of 670m/s, the minimum separation between soldiers for the airbags to fully deploy in time is 16.8m.

Of course this calculation assumes that the airbags do nothing to mitigate lethality of the blast-induced pressures or fragments. IOW it is possible that a soldier with the system may be within 10m of the blast, have his airbag semi-inflated yet escape otherwise lethal overpressures with some injury.
 
#17
One in which one of 14 patents...
Patents in themselves are a form of equity. Instead of building up material wealth I am trying to build up intellectual property in hopes of reaping greater returns later.

...(which is no arbiter of innovation, success or originality by the way)...
I agree. I never claimed to be innovative, successful or original. It is not in my character to boast. I simply present people who want to know, or are in the position to jointly collaborate to develop my patents, with the evidence and let them judge for themselves.

...gets off the drawing board and implemented?
Yes I am working on that!
 
A

armadillo

Guest
#18
The first ever airbag was designed by a hollywood stuntman, he tested himself, got a few burn injuries and bruised face. Stepped out of the car and pronounced it works.

Later stolen by the car industry, being a maverick is the neccessity of invention
 
#20
Assuming an airbag inflation time of 25ms and a constant blast wave velocity of 670m/s, the minimum separation between soldiers for the airbags to fully deploy in time is 16.8m.

Of course this calculation assumes that the airbags do nothing to mitigate lethality of the blast-induced pressures or fragments. IOW it is possible that a soldier with the system may be within 10m of the blast, have his airbag semi-inflated yet escape otherwise lethal overpressures with some injury.
Surely to counteract the overpressure you're going to need a counterwave of a similar velocity - have you considered the possibility of a miniaturised Explosive reactive armour panels to wear on body armour panels that would cancel out the penetration effect of bullets and shell fragments?
 
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