Net Neutrality:Break the internet.

#81
BT hasn't been publicly owned since 1984 when it became a private company.
Well, I would go for 1993 when HMG sold the last of it's stake in BT, meaning HMG had no influence on how the company was run outside of normal regulatory stuff.

Unlike here where the equivalent, Proximus Group, formerly Belgacom, is still 50.1% owned by the State.
 
#82
Those feckers at the EU Commission are at it again....

 
#83
An update for the law changed by the FCC which is supposed to come into effect in June.

A U.S. State Has Passed Its Own Net Neutrality Law, and Others Are Set to Follow.
By DAVID MEYER
Washington has become the first state in the U.S. to pass legislation mandating net neutrality after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in December to end the rule.

Net neutrality is a principle that says no Internet traffic should get special treatment, and Internet service providers can’t block or degrade certain traffic because the website or service pumping it out isn’t willing to pay up for prioritization.

Although the FCC is in the process of rescinding the rule, most Americans are in favor of net neutrality. And states are stepping in where Ajit Pai’s FCCrefuses to tread.

“Today we make history: Washington will be the first state in the nation to preserve the open internet,” Washington Governor Jay Inslee said Monday, as he signed the legislation. “We’ve seen the power of an open Internet. It allows a student in Washington to connect with researchers all around the world — or a small business to compete in the global marketplace. It’s allowed the free flow of information and ideas in one of the greatest demonstrations of free speech in our history.”

The state’s law prohibits broadband companies from blocking legal content, applications and services, or blocking “non-harmful devices” from connecting to their networks. It also bans the throttling of certain Internet traffic—something providers have in the past done with Internet voice services—along with paid prioritization.

Washington isn’t the only state taking such action, even if it’s the first to see it through to the finish line. Oregon’s house and senate have passed a similar measure, and Governor Kate Brown is expected to approve it. More than half a dozen other states are also considering net neutrality legislation.

In some states, governors have taken a more direct approach, signing executive orders that mandate net neutrality. These include Vermont, Montana, New York, and New Jersey.

In Hawaii, Governor David Ige ordered state government agencies to only take Internet-related services from companies whose contracts include net neutrality principles.

Meanwhile, a coalition of almost two dozen state attorneys general is suing the FCC at the U.S. Court of Appeals, demanding a federal-level rollback of the agency’s decision.

http://fortune.com
 
#84
#85
Until recently I had not realised just how great surveillance was on the internet. We tend to think that Google and the rest of the FANG group are the problem. However a Firefox Add-on "Lightbeam" tells me, in great detail, that since November 2017 I have visited 517 sites and have connected to without my knowledge 2322 third party sites.

Some effort is now going into making life difficult for these people viz. VPN, Adblock Plus, Quant and Cookie Killer.

Any other wrinkles would be appreciated.
 
#86
Until recently I had not realised just how great surveillance was on the internet. We tend to think that Google and the rest of the FANG group are the problem. However a Firefox Add-on "Lightbeam" tells me, in great detail, that since November 2017 I have visited 517 sites and have connected to without my knowledge 2322 third party sites.

Some effort is now going into making life difficult for these people viz. VPN, Adblock Plus, Quant and Cookie Killer.

Any other wrinkles would be appreciated.
The ad business relies on third party web sites. The ads you see are normally served by a third party.

  1. The site operator puts a bit of Javascript (programming code) in their web page which goes out and contacts an ad company.
  2. The ad company then checks your PC to see if you have one of their "cookies" (a bit of unique data) already.
  3. If you do, they read it to check what amounts to a unique serial number for you. They can only read cookies they gave you, they can't read ones from anyone else.
  4. If you don't, then they set a cookie which they can check for later when you visit another web site.
  5. From the cookie they read a unique serial number which they can compare to their database to seen what other web sites you may have visited that they also serve.
  6. They won''t know who you are, but they will be able to tell what sort of web sites you like to visit (so long as they are web sites they serve ads for).
  7. From this they will build up a profile of you which they then take to advertising customers and ask them to bid on who would like to show an ad to you.
  8. The profile will be things like "has been looking at expensive watches recently", or "been doing some price comparisons on airline tickets".
  9. The advertising customers will take that profile and try to guess whether you might be the sort of person who would buy their goods or services. This happens in a completely automated fashion on their computer systems
  10. The highest bidder gets to show you an ad and the ad gets sent directly from the third party site to your PC.
  11. The original site operator (e.g. ARRSE) gets paid a few fractions of a penny for every ad that gets shown. The higher the advertisers bid to show you an ad, the more the original site gets paid (it's still a derisory amount though unless the traffic volume is huge).

All of the above happens in seconds in a completely automated fashion while you are waiting for the web page to show up. The bulk of what goes through your Internet connection for most web pages will be stuff related to showing you ads.

If you have a Facebook page or other similar social media, they do the same on every web page that has a Facebook "like" button. Those social media buttons exist so they can track you. The difference though is that Facebook actually does know who you really are, as well as where you live, how old you are, who you are related to, who your friends are, where you like to go on vacation, etc., etc. They will buy third party data from other sources to find out things like how much money you have, whether you own your home, etc. They then sell this information and auction it off to advertisers.

As you can see from the above, nearly all those "2322 third party sites" will be advertisers or Facebook, Twitter, etc. (who amount to the same thing as advertisers).

If you block ads when you visit ARRSE you are taking bread from the mouths of the COs children. More seriously, ads are what pays for the cost of running ARRSE, and you can imagine that they get some fairly sizable Internet bills for running the servers. Of course what you do elsewhere is your business.
 
#88
oh yeah if you go to a website with a facebook like symbol on it - regardless if you are logged into facebook - facebook can track you as well
Facebook use tracking cookies on all the web sites which have Facebook "like" buttons to track you around the Internet. Then the next time you log into Facebook they match up the tracking cookie with the log-in cookie and bam! they've got you. They have a complete history of where you've been and what you've been doing on the Internet while you weren't logged into Facebook.
 
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