Nepal Has Fallen

#23

rampant

LE
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#24
Not really... for two reasons.

The Gurkhas are almost entirely recruited from a small handful of hill tribes. The majority of Nepalis have nothing whatsoever to do with the Gurkhas.

The Gurkhas are essentially mercenaries. Their service to the Crown is tied inextricably to the favourable ToS with the British Army in comparison to the Indian Army and Singaporean Army Gurkhas, who they will quite happily serve with as a second option if they dip selection.

A comparable ToS was fixed by treaty with the Indian Government at independence in order that Britain didn't get the cream of the crop. The terms of this treaty agreement have slowly fallen by the wayside. Their 'loyalty' is now further enhanced by the promise of automatic British citizenship at end of service, as well as right to remain for their extended families.
The Ghurka Contingent in Singapore is Part of the Police not the Army, though it may s commanded by a British Army Major on secondment.

The Tripartite Agreement applies to the UK, India & Nepal
 
#26
Both those links are dtd 2012 !!
Ummm ... yes. Not sure what your point is.

As I said, "they made the position clear a decade ago and have confirmed it regularly since."

The Maoist government first declared the intended policy in 2008 (a decade ago) and it's been part of their election manifesto ever since, including in 2012. Nothing's changed.

I linked to those two as they make the position clear, regarding Gurkhas both to India and the UK.
 
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#28
The Ghurka Contingent in Singapore is Part of the Police not the Army, though it may s commanded by a British Army Major on secondment.

The Tripartite Agreement applies to the UK, India & Nepal
On contract now, I believe, not secondment.

The GC was originally included in the Tripartite Agreement through the UK when Singapore was a colony, then it became part of a separate bilateral agreement on independence.

So far the Maoist government hasn't been clear on its intentions about the GC.
OT, but has anyone been to Nepal? It's one of the places which I wanted to visit, but never really got around to it.
Yes. I'm sure the Lonely Planet Guides will tell you all you need to know.
 
#33
OT, but has anyone been to Nepal? It's one of the places which I wanted to visit, but never really got around to it.
It's a bit hilly in places:

DSC_4958b.jpg
 
#35
Couldn’t give exact numbers, but definitely a few, don’t know an awful lot of them to begin with but there was 100% a few of them were
Sorry. but I don't find that credible or even remotely possible.

While it's thirty years since I was in the Bde so pre conversion to Christianity becoming legal, at that time out of 10,000 only three were Christians and none were Catholic (according to one of the three, in my regt); all were "line brats", and none made any public display of their religion or failed to follow the Hindu line and festivals.

While the number of Christians in Nepal has trebled in the last fifteen years it's still small at around 3 - 400,000 but nearly all are Protestant / evangelical and only about 10,000 are Catholic - about 1 in 3,000 of the population.

The vast majority of those are in and around Kathmandu, where being Catholic is considered a sign of being 'upper class', particularly if you went to a Catholic school - the last King of Nepal, King Gyanendra, and the previous King his elder brother King Birendra, both went to a Jesuit school in India (St Joseph's), hence being a Catholic isn't popular among the general increasingly communist and nationalist population, particularly among the Maoists - Catholic missions and schools have been bombed and burnt down.

Gurkha recruitment is still very much village and caste based (you can't just 'turn up' and apply), at least for all except clerks, and Catholics in particular are increasingly ostracised in Nepal, so if you "don't know an awful lot" of Gurkhas but "a few of them" are Catholic that's way, way above national levels (maybe a hundred times or more).

Are you sure you mean 'Gurkhas' as in those in the Bde of Gurkhas, or do you mean either ex-Gurkhas who've transferred to the rest of the Army as F & C or naturalised Brits, or Brits of Nepalese descent, so also not Gurkhas?

In my experience it's not at all unusual for SE Asians to use Christianity as an outward show of being 'modern' and 'westernised', particularly with those who want to feel 'part of Western society', but I just can't believe that the number of Catholics in the Bde is a hundred times or more above the national average - that just doesn't seem possible.
 
#36

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