need help with some ww1 documents (coldstream)

Hi, I've been advised to come on here for help so any kind of information would be greatly appreciated.
I've tried looking online for some bits but there's things that I can't find anything on.

This was my great-great grandfather, he was a coldstreamer. My nan told me that his bullet wound was the size of an old penny.

Wanting to know anything about the regiment he was in as i tried searching for the regiment number and found nothing, any other info would be great as well.

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I would try the Great War Forum - Great War Forum The RHQ bless their cotton socks will have his Regimental details - sadly a Guardsman is unlikely to be well documented unless decorated or notorious!
The GWF love a challenge - even better an Old Contemptible who was under fire in 1914 and who was then shot in the back in 1915.
Have a look at this Loos 1915: The Coldstream Guards
 
Sadly, his Service/Attestation papers do not seem to have survived.

The entry for the Silver War Badge refers to Kings' Regulations para 392 sub xvi (KR 392 xvi) as the reason for discharge which tells us this:



KR392%20Para%2016.jpg


KR392%20Header.jpg


Of his 3 medals, 2 (British War and Victory Medals) were authorised for issue on 12 Nov 1919.

For further research, you'll need to contact these people: The Guards Museum - Family Research
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
If you join Forces War Records (I believe they offer 2 weeks' free subscription to first-time members) and search against his surname and regimental number you will find some interesting information.

In short, however, it appears that he may have had continuous service since 1914 (which is interesting as my guess would have been that he was a recalled Reservist). You already know that he entered the French theatre of war on 11 September 1914 (see the date described as 'Qualifying date' on his Medal Index Card). This doesnt coincide with the date of any of the three battalions which were out in 1914 going overseas and so indicates that he was a later draft to his battalion. Within less than a month he was out of theatre again and evacuated back to England. There is a medical record from one of the Base hospitals indicating that he was admitted with shrapnel wounds to his left toes on 3 October. Allowing a day or two for him to pass through the casualty evacuation system from Field Ambulance to Casualty Clearing Station, that would suggest to me that he was wounded around 30 September/1 October. Helpfully, the record also tells us that he was with No.4 Company of the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, which should help in narrowing down the circumstances of this wound. His age is given as 32, by the way. By 6 Oct he was at 4th Northern General at Lincoln.

Given that the description of this wound and the wound for which he was discharged don't tally, there seems to have been another wound, although I'm surprised not to see a daily casualty list entry for it. It would suggest to me that he went back overseas later in 1914 or early 1915 and got wounded fairly shortly thereafter, in order to be discharged physically unfit by July of that year.

As others say, you'll need to access the Guards' regimental archives to find out much more.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Was he pensioned or just discharged? If he was pensioned then his medical documents would have been held until recently in Edinburgh. They were handed three years ago to the 'Western Front Association' Committee, who will sell copies of the medical docs to you for a small sum.
 
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Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
The surviving documents don't provide an indication that he was pensioned, unfortunately. My understanding is that both Ancestry and Find My Past have catalogued and digitised the pension records so if he had applied I would have expected to come across it when searching these.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
The surviving documents don't provide an indication that he was pensioned, unfortunately. My understanding is that both Ancestry and Find My Past have catalogued and digitised the pension records so if he had applied I would have expected to come across it when searching these.

It won't cost anything to go on line to the WFA and ask them if they have got them, You will need only his number, rank and name. I did, and was very pleasantly surprised to receive a few pages of Med history.
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
It won't cost anything to go on line to the WFA and ask them if they have got them, You will need only his number, rank and name. I did, and was very pleasantly surprised to receive a few pages of Med history.

Apologies - we may have been talking at cross-purposes. I was thinking of the War Office 364 Pension Records whereas I think you may have been referring to the pensions ledgers and record cards, referred to here:

The Western Front Association preserves a major Great War archive of 6.5 million records | The Western Front Association

and here:

The Scanning of Pension Records is underway | The Western Front Association

and now searchable here?:

UK, WWI Pension Ledgers and Index Cards, 1914-1923

If so, it will be interesting to see if they still offer their manual search facility.
 

Trilby

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
A couple of other bits of information: born 1880, postwar address was 30 Wood Street, Whinney Hill, Rotherham.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Apologies - we may have been talking at cross-purposes. I was thinking of the War Office 364 Pension Records whereas I think you may have been referring to the pensions ledgers and record cards, referred to here:

The Western Front Association preserves a major Great War archive of 6.5 million records | The Western Front Association

and here:

The Scanning of Pension Records is underway | The Western Front Association

and now searchable here?:

UK, WWI Pension Ledgers and Index Cards, 1914-1923

If so, it will be interesting to see if they still offer their manual search facility.

When you ask the WFA for the Records. the request goes to a small body of the association, they are enthusiasts and will talk with you on the telephone in order to help you further.
 

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