Need help for a storyboard for a short animation about the Aden Emergency

Hi VLTR,
Probably not much help story wise, but my late father served there with 3 Para, that's him with the typical para pose, and my uncle Michael typically outside a makeshift bar.
May help you to understand the British soldiers "Hey, there's a war on, but we still have time to smile" type attitude.
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VLTR

Clanker
Hi
Served 65 to 67 in Aden/South Arabia.
Up Country, Aden (Maala/Steamer Point with SWB, Crater with A&SH and lots of guarding/escorts etc), plus of course the beach as much as possible.
All a very long time ago
Oh nice sir, another first hand account! Do you mind talking about your experiences there? All first hand accounts of the situation in the Aden will be appreciated.
 

VLTR

Clanker
Hi VLTR,
Probably not much help story wise, but my late father served there with 3 Para, that's him with the typical para pose, and my uncle Michael typically outside a makeshift bar.
May help you to understand the British soldiers "Hey, there's a war on, but we still have time to smile" type attitude.
View attachment 587933
View attachment 587929
This is very very good photographic documentation, thanks for that. If you have any more photos feel free to share! Is your uncle still alive? If so, do you reckon you can get news of this project to him?
 

VLTR

Clanker
Of course, will assist where I can.
Alright. I have some questions for you, I hope you can(and will be comfy) answering them.

1. What was your daily routine in the Aden? By daily I mean on an average day with no "interruptions".

2. What were the components of a patrol during an average day(the numbers of riflemen, machine gunners, etc.)?

3. Did you have any sort of entertainment in your posting there(TV, Radio, Live Music)?

4. Was there a divide between officers and enlisted men at the time? Or was there not?

5. Were the locals familiar with you and your comrades, or were the locals estranged, or perhaps, terrified?

6. At the event of an engagement with hostile forces, what were you trained to do?

7. What were the military regulations of the time(addressing senior officers, how and when to wear certain uniforms, etc.) If there are any more regulations(including unwritten ones) I did not list here would you mind telling me?

8. Did you ever run into hostile forces, or other hostile elements(such as landmines)? If so, what was the experience like?


That's all the questions I will ask for now, I will ask more questions as my research progresses. Thank you very much for your help sir.
 
This is very very good photographic documentation, thanks for that. If you have any more photos feel free to share! Is your uncle still alive? If so, do you reckon you can get news of this project to him?
Unfortunately no, he passed some years ago.
 

Gus216

Swinger
Alright. I have some questions for you, I hope you can(and will be comfy) answering them.

1. What was your daily routine in the Aden? By daily I mean on an average day with no "interruptions".

2. What were the components of a patrol during an average day(the numbers of riflemen, machine gunners, etc.)?

3. Did you have any sort of entertainment in your posting there(TV, Radio, Live Music)?

4. Was there a divide between officers and enlisted men at the time? Or was there not?

5. Were the locals familiar with you and your comrades, or were the locals estranged, or perhaps, terrified?

6. At the event of an engagement with hostile forces, what were you trained to do?

7. What were the military regulations of the time(addressing senior officers, how and when to wear certain uniforms, etc.) If there are any more regulations(including unwritten ones) I did not list here would you mind telling me?

8. Did you ever run into hostile forces, or other hostile elements(such as landmines)? If so, what was the experience like?


That's all the questions I will ask for now, I will ask more questions as my research progresses. Thank you very much for your help sir.
  • What was your daily routine in the Aden? By daily I mean on an average day with no "interruptions".
  • In camp, generally up very early (0500) to do a full days work before the heat of the day set in (1300). Life out on duty or up-country was very different.
    2. What were the components of a patrol during an average day(the numbers of riflemen, machine gunners, etc.)?
  • Typically 5, gun team, commander

    3. Did you have any sort of entertainment in your posting there(TV, Radio, Live Music)?
  • Yes. BFBS radio, BBC world service, TV in NAAFI, sometimes very occasional show.

    4. Was there a divide between officers and enlisted men at the time? Or was there not?
  • Yes, as a very young soldier my usual contacts were Cpl and Sgt.

    5. Were the locals familiar with you and your comrades, or were the locals estranged, or perhaps, terrified?
  • In camp fairly familiar with Char Wallah and Dhobi Wallah, out of camp elements of estranged and terrified I guess.

    6. At the event of an engagement with hostile forces, what were you trained to do?
  • Depends, but usually immediate action including return fire and take cover

    7. What were the military regulations of the time(addressing senior officers, how and when to wear certain uniforms, etc.) If there are any more regulations(including unwritten ones) I did not list here would you mind telling me?
  • Always Queens Regulations reinforced by local orders, always address Officers as Sir.

    8. Did you ever run into hostile forces, or other hostile elements(such as landmines)? If so, what was the experience like?
  • Yes, a mix of exhilaration, excitement, and at times some fear. Saw landmines on Dhala Road (Radfan), and my vehicle hit an AP mine with severe tyre damage – a bit of a shock but it was an armoured vehicle so no personnel injured.

General Comments: I arrived in Aden direct from UK as a young 18 year who had never been abroad, it was October so in my winter UK clothes, arriving in Aden was like walking into a blast furnace with extreme humidity, a real shock. I did see much of Arabia in my two years from the Radfan (various locations), to Wadi Hadraumat (Mukalla), and late 66 to 67 in and about Aden itself. Lots of time in desert areas, driving N along coast (beach), great experience. We did get time off mainly in Steamer Point or Little Aden areas, so not all bad by any means.
 

VLTR

Clanker
  • What was your daily routine in the Aden? By daily I mean on an average day with no "interruptions".
  • In camp, generally up very early (0500) to do a full days work before the heat of the day set in (1300). Life out on duty or up-country was very different.
What was the itinerary for a full day's work? And what did you do after 1300?
  • 2. What were the components of a patrol during an average day(the numbers of riflemen, machine gunners, etc.)?
  • Typically 5, gun team, commander
What was usually the rank of the commander? Did anyone in an average patrol carry an LMG? And did you usually make a line formation or were you more spread out during patrols? Bonus: How would a reece mission go in the Aden?
Yes. BFBS radio, BBC world service, TV in NAAFI, sometimes very occasional show.
What kind of music did you listen to in the Aden? And what TV shows did you watch in NAAFI?
  • 6. At the event of an engagement with hostile forces, what were you trained to do?
  • Depends, but usually immediate action including return fire and take cover
At what level of engagement would you need to call for reinforcements? How long was the average firefight during the Aden?
  • 7. What were the military regulations of the time(addressing senior officers, how and when to wear certain uniforms, etc.) If there are any more regulations(including unwritten ones) I did not list here would you mind telling me?
  • Always Queens Regulations reinforced by local orders, always address Officers as Sir.
What were the local orders? And was there any sort of regulation(s) that got on your nerves?
  • 8. Did you ever run into hostile forces, or other hostile elements(such as landmines)? If so, what was the experience like?
  • Yes, a mix of exhilaration, excitement, and at times some fear. Saw landmines on Dhala Road (Radfan), and my vehicle hit an AP mine with severe tyre damage – a bit of a shock but it was an armoured vehicle so no personnel injured.
What was your vehicle that day? If you're comfortable with it, can you explain, in detail, about the events of the day you hit an AP mine on Dhala Rd.?
Arabia in my two years from the Radfan (various locations)
What were the various locations you were stationed in in the Radfan?
Lots of time in desert areas, driving N along coast (beach), great experience.
Do you have any pictures of driving along the coast? If not, which coast were you driving in(pictures of this will help me draw the scenery)?
We did get time off mainly in Steamer Point or Little Aden areas
What did you do there during your time off? Did you swim, or did you do other activities? And was there a time where you were called back from time off because of an emergency?

One more thing, I forgot the most important question, what unit were you part of in the Aden?

I look forward to hear from you. Thank you.


P.S @Grownup_Rafbrat Would you mind answering questions in the same format as this one?
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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What was the itinerary for a full day's work? And what did you do after 1300?

What was usually the rank of the commander? Did anyone in an average patrol carry an LMG? And did you usually make a line formation or were you more spread out during patrols? Bonus: How would a reece mission go in the Aden?

What kind of music did you listen to in the Aden? And what TV shows did you watch in NAAFI?

At what level of engagement would you need to call for reinforcements? How long was the average firefight during the Aden?

What were the local orders? And was there any sort of regulation(s) that got on your nerves?

What was your vehicle that day? If you're comfortable with it, can you explain, in detail, about the events of the day you hit an AP mine on Dhala Rd.?

What were the various locations you were stationed in in the Radfan?

Do you have any pictures of driving along the coast? If not, which coast were you driving in(pictures of this will help me draw the scenery)?

What did you do there during your time off? Did you swim, or did you do other activities? And was there a time where you were called back from time off because of an emergency?

One more thing, I forgot the most important question, what unit were you part of in the Aden?

I look forward to hear from you. Thank you.


P.S @Grownup_Rafbrat Would you mind answering questions in the same format as this one?
I think you need to consider persec and put these details into PMs. Also that 55 years ago a young soldier might not want to share in public what he did on afternoons off!

PM me and I will do what I can, please remember that I was between 6 and 8 years old...
 

VLTR

Clanker
I think you need to consider persec and put these details into PMs. Also that 55 years ago a young soldier might not want to share in public what he did on afternoons off!

PM me and I will do what I can, please remember that I was between 6 and 8 years old...
Alright, noted, I did not even realize that there was a PM function.
 

Mbongwe

Old-Salt
  • What was your daily routine in the Aden? By daily I mean on an average day with no "interruptions".
  • In camp, generally up very early (0500) to do a full days work before the heat of the day set in (1300). Life out on duty or up-country was very different.
    2. What were the components of a patrol during an average day(the numbers of riflemen, machine gunners, etc.)?
  • Typically 5, gun team, commander

    3. Did you have any sort of entertainment in your posting there(TV, Radio, Live Music)?
  • Yes. BFBS radio, BBC world service, TV in NAAFI, sometimes very occasional show.

    4. Was there a divide between officers and enlisted men at the time? Or was there not?
  • Yes, as a very young soldier my usual contacts were Cpl and Sgt.

    5. Were the locals familiar with you and your comrades, or were the locals estranged, or perhaps, terrified?
  • In camp fairly familiar with Char Wallah and Dhobi Wallah, out of camp elements of estranged and terrified I guess.

    6. At the event of an engagement with hostile forces, what were you trained to do?
  • Depends, but usually immediate action including return fire and take cover

    7. What were the military regulations of the time(addressing senior officers, how and when to wear certain uniforms, etc.) If there are any more regulations(including unwritten ones) I did not list here would you mind telling me?
  • Always Queens Regulations reinforced by local orders, always address Officers as Sir.

    8. Did you ever run into hostile forces, or other hostile elements(such as landmines)? If so, what was the experience like?
  • Yes, a mix of exhilaration, excitement, and at times some fear. Saw landmines on Dhala Road (Radfan), and my vehicle hit an AP mine with severe tyre damage – a bit of a shock but it was an armoured vehicle so no personnel injured.

General Comments: I arrived in Aden direct from UK as a young 18 year who had never been abroad, it was October so in my winter UK clothes, arriving in Aden was like walking into a blast furnace with extreme humidity, a real shock. I did see much of Arabia in my two years from the Radfan (various locations), to Wadi Hadraumat (Mukalla), and late 66 to 67 in and about Aden itself. Lots of time in desert areas, driving N along coast (beach), great experience. We did get time off mainly in Steamer Point or Little Aden areas, so not all bad by any means.
Fascinating insight @Gus216, even just an interested reader with nothing to do with the OP's project. Thanks again.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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Although I don't think a young soldier would somehow have the same options for fun in Aden as he would have done in Singapore when he was back from a tour in Borneo.
Necessity is the mother of invention, I believe. There was a hospital with nurses, a couple of schools with young female teachers, and of course lonely wives with OMO packets.

One of the regular beggars in Ma'alla was a lad with ginger hair, so there must have been some social interaction with the local populace.
 
One of the regular beggars in Ma'alla was a lad with ginger hair, so there must have been some social interaction with the local populace.
Quite possible, if he had a full head of ginger.
However, I saw many Arabs with with hair dyed ginger at the front.
This apparently,(although you couldn't always believe all that you were told), signified that they had made the pilgrimage to Mecca.
 

VLTR

Clanker
Although I don't think a young soldier would somehow have the same options for fun in Aden as he would have done in Singapore when he was back from a tour in Borneo.
Did you serve in Borneo? If so, that's cool, I might do Borneo after Aden!
 

VLTR

Clanker
Quite possible, if he had a full head of ginger.
However, I saw many Arabs with with hair dyed ginger at the front.
This apparently,(although you couldn't always believe all that you were told), signified that they had made the pilgrimage to Mecca.
I used to live in a Muslim majority place, and yes, some Muslims dye their hair(or beards where I lived) to signify participation in Haji.
 
I think it's worth noting that Aden was two quite different operations.

There was the 'up-country' operations against 'dissident' tribesmen, basically because the Area - especially the Dhala Road, the level of lawlessness rose to an unacceptable level. This of course was the hinterland (The Aden Protectorate) and the tactics and vocabulary would have been familiar for anyone who'd fought on the Khyber Pass - it was real North West frontier stuff but with the addition of Hunter FGA (Fighter Ground Attack) aircraft and, during the Radfan campaign heavy artillery ( 5.5s brought in from Singapore. )

Then there was the operation in Aden Town ( Aden Colony ), this was the war of terrorist grenades, sniping and assassinations both against military personnel and civilians.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Quite possible, if he had a full head of ginger.
However, I saw many Arabs with with hair dyed ginger at the front.
This apparently,(although you couldn't always believe all that you were told), signified that they had made the pilgrimage to Mecca.
It was a full head of ginger hair, to accompany his freckles.
 

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