Need advice on Police search.

Golf club.

He should be beaten to a pulp with a pick helve for being a member of a golfist organisation.
Nothing wroong with golf. I rather enjoy hacking away.
However, it is the bunch of braying tw@ts and moany old farts at the bar afterwards who annoyed me.
My late father played. And was one of the moany old farts. When his arthritis stopped him playing, he moved to the bowling club, as a Country Member. ("yes! we'll remember!")
"Are you comig down the Bowling Club?"
"No."
"Why not?"
"Because I don't like it there."
"Hrmmph"
 
You were in a Beano cartoon and I claim my sixpence.
Cartoon? Cover star!
1642238728857.jpeg
 
Thanks for the reply. My question, with respect, was for someone who understands to apply the law in section 1 of PACE 1984 to the facts above and explain whether the stop and search that the officer conducted was lawful.

The issue is centred around the grounds. Using an attitude test to shake the tree and see what falls out doesn't square with the relevant legislation and legal principles. Thanks again for all the replies and advice

To be clear, I entirely reject the idea that the attitude test is somehow ‘shaking the tree’. It isn’t, it’s simple good coppering. A constable might speak to 100 people over the course of a day, everything from ‘what’s the time’ to ‘evening all’ and ‘is this your car sir’ - the vast, vast majority of those interactions will be perfectly mundane, reasonable and ordinary - however if any one of them acts in an evasive, slippery or difficult manner it is right and proper that a constable asks himself “why is this person acting in such a manner upon being spoken to by the police?”. It quite literally is something to be suspicious about.
 
To be clear, I entirely reject the idea that the attitude test is somehow ‘shaking the tree’. It isn’t, it’s simple good coppering. A constable might speak to 100 people over the course of a day, everything from ‘what’s the time’ to ‘evening all’ and ‘is this your car sir’ - the vast, vast majority of those interactions will be perfectly mundane, reasonable and ordinary - however if any one of them acts in an evasive, slippery or difficult manner it is right and proper that a constable asks himself “why is this person acting in such a manner upon being spoken to by the police?”. It quite literally is something to be suspicious about.
Yep.
I've done nothing wrong, and have nothing to fear etc etc etc.
So why give it large and get mouthy?
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The more fuss and stroppiness you indulge in with the police the more you deflect them from their duty of protecting law abiding people.
 
Yep.
I've done nothing wrong, and have nothing to fear etc etc etc.
So why give it large and get mouthy?

Because it's a teenager! They all sulk & mouth off if they think they can get away with it.
Unless told otherwise or experienced it from the other side.

I reckon a smart parent would edit together a video, like them adventure-choice books*. Where a public/police encounter gets to a choice point of 'gob off', 'keep talking but not shouting', 'keep quiet/accept words of advice' & you see the consequences. There are training videos from the police side, I'm sure.

Or let the kid learn the hard way.

*'if you choose to open the door on the left, turn to page 92, door to the right, page 12'
 
The more fuss and stroppiness you indulge in with the police the more you deflect them from their duty of protecting law abiding people.
I grew up in the SUS era and there were a lot of coppers that were d1cks as well
(from my perspective, but also from talking to those in the job at the time)
 

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