NC500

There's sections of Drumbeg road that are decidedly dicey.
Single track, above the sea, cliff on one side, drop on the other. Blind summit on a bend.
Enough to make a nurse passenger hold her head in her hands, alternating between covering her eyes and whimpering.
:)
It certainly sounds like those sections of road require more care than most, but
any driver who doesn't recognise and adjust their approach to the hazards you describe, planning for what they can see, what they can't see, and what they might reasonably expect, are the real danger, not the road itself.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
It certainly sounds like those sections of road require more care than most, but
any driver who doesn't recognise and adjust their approach to the hazards you describe, planning for what they can see, what they can't see, and what they might reasonably expect, are the real danger, not the road itself.


So most tourists on the NC500 then? :)
 

mrboo

LE
It certainly sounds like those sections of road require more care than most, but
any driver who doesn't recognise and adjust their approach to the hazards you describe, planning for what they can see, what they can't see, and what they might reasonably expect, are the real danger, not the road itself.
You say that but a mate of mine a few years ago on the road to Torridon. Pulled in to a layby to let a car pass the next thing he is rolling down the hill as the side of the road gave way. But that all adds to the excitement of driving in the Highlands.
 
You say that but a mate of mine a few years ago on the road to Torridon. Pulled in to a layby to let a car pass the next thing he is rolling down the hill as the side of the road gave way. But that all adds to the excitement of driving in the Highlands.
The North of Scotland has become increasingly popular as a staycation destination, and last year was exceptionally busy as expected.

But, when a car park is full, that's it, until someone leaves, there is no space and last year, the car park (aka NC400) ETA even NC 500 :mad:.....especially the motorhome segment was so full it was detrimental to the good order of holiday discipline (memories of Section 69!). Frankly, I would anticipate that it will be just as bad this year.

The locals, grateful for the economic stimulus after a horrendous previous season, had to 'haud their wheest' at the rubbish left behind by some mongers, at the delay in getting from a-b for work or other domestic needs, and there were, therefore, calls for limits on numbers of motorhomes (the usual limiting factor previously being the availability of holiday accommodation).

Scotland wasn't built for this, and to change it would spoil the attraction. So, it's a dilemma. My solution is to travel slightly out of season and to locate a cottage in the middle of the region I want to visit. Days oot with a tent in the boot (poetic eh?) for wild nights. I tend to agree that if drivers were more attentive and less greedy with time and space, it would help. But, human nature and all that. That said, if you have never been, it's a fabulous place to visit - anywhere from Argyle, to Caithness - just don't try to do it all in one vacation.
 
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Is there any other reason that 90% of 4x4 owners actually own 4x4s than "it'll look good in the photos"?

Point taken though - it does make looking for a suitable hire car a lot easier if any regular car can do it.

You site quite a bit higher so you can see over the hedges and generally see a lot more of everything.
 
You site quite a bit higher so you can see over the hedges and generally see a lot more of everything.
My dad made this remark when I was a kid and over the years, I came to echo the sentiment:

"It's alright driving through beautiful countryside but, as the driver, all you get to see is miles and miles of white line in the middle of the road".

Thankfully, we did a lot of walking (and not as a result of the car breaking down).
 
You say that but a mate of mine a few years ago on the road to Torridon. Pulled in to a layby to let a car pass the next thing he is rolling down the hill as the side of the road gave way. But that all adds to the excitement of driving in the Highlands.

That'll be under the aspect of things you can reasonably expect(or not expect).
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
You site quite a bit higher so you can see over the hedges and generally see a lot more of everything.

You've not been to the Highlands have you?

Hedges?

It's rocks, forests or moorland!
 

exbluejob

LE
Book Reviewer
You've not been to the Highlands have you?

Hedges?

It's rocks, forests or moorland!
And if you go to Shetland its rocks, moorland and the road edges are marked with empty cans of MacEwans Export (the red ones AKA Shetland Roses).
 

philc

LE
You've not been to the Highlands have you?

Hedges?

It's rocks, forests or moorland!

Sure I have said this about my cousin, who whilst lovely can be a bit, well have her blond moment's.

Driving over the Yorkshire Moors on a sunny day, she is driving I am in the front, take care of those sheep by the side of the road Maxine, oh I thought they were white rocks she replies.
 
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