• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Nazi Salutes

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
Been watching The World at War and have just been struck at the amount of variety in Nazi saluting. For example there's the familiar straight arm at 45˚ angle.



then there's the straight arm parallel with the ground which has a limp-wrist variant also.




Lastly there's the forearm pointed directly up with hand bent slightly rearward.



Question: Was there a purpose for these differences or could they ust salute in whatever fashion tickled they happened to fancy?
 
#2
I always thought the 45 degree one was the norm and officers used the point directly up one,but christ knows. The 45 degree one goes down well in my local corner shop so i'll stick with that.
 
#3
Actually,maybe the point directly up one is for confined spaces so they dont hit each other,and the parallel ones used when theres loads of space just to make use of that space.Maybe...
 
#5
I thought the 'up 45-out 45' was the standard, the horizontal was the one Adolf used when taking salutes (easier to hold?) and the 'who-nicked-my-tea-tray' version was his own (I've don't remember seeing photographs of any others use it (although some of the leadership may have done so).

W
 
#8
Being Fuehrer means not having anyone to grip you for sloppy saluting. He was just taking advantage of this rule to piddle in Goering's eye (who got to wear the cool uniforms with big sleeves):

 
S

Screw_The_Nut

Guest
#9
Whiskybreath said:
Being Fuehrer means not having anyone to grip you for sloppy saluting. He was just taking advantage of this rule to piddle in Goering's eye (who got to wear the cool uniforms with big sleeves):

Ahhh.... a Nazi pirate!
 
#11
yeah and you know what? Aparently its "illegal" to salute at football matches these days. Political correctness gone mad. This is almost as insane as my 1 season ban for offering free half time bananas to some of the chelsea players. Madness.
 
#12
arby said:
yeah and you know what? Aparently its "illegal" to salute at football matches these days. Political correctness gone mad. This is almost as insane as my 1 season ban for offering free half time bananas to some of the chelsea players. Madness.
Its illegal to salute at football matches? Anyone told those blokes in funny hats that play trumpets and things?
On second thoughts don't tell them, maybe they might get banned and we wouldn't have to listen to the band. :)
 
#14
RP578 said:
Been watching The World at War and have just been struck at the amount of variety in Nazi saluting. For example there's the familiar straight arm at 45˚ angle.



then there's the straight arm parallel with the ground which has a limp-wrist variant also.




Lastly there's the forearm pointed directly up with hand bent slightly rearward.



Question: Was there a purpose for these differences or could they ust salute in whatever fashion tickled they happened to fancy?
He just saying BIG SMILES to the miserable crowd ! :twisted:
 
#15
Going from picture and films ( :roll: ) evidence. I find that the top salute was a early form of salute. note in the picture above Hitler is wearing a brown shirt, as is the bloke in the foreground. This colour went out of fashion after the night of the long knives.

After that I generally reckon unter-mensch (ie non SS or Gestapo) generally salute 45 degree straight up. With the uber mensch (SS and Gestapo) generally were a bit lazy and only went to the horizontal.

As for the botom picture of the three. He is the fuhrer, do you want to go for the slim fast option in a Camp of your choosing for picking him up?
 
S

Screw_The_Nut

Guest
#16
A better question would be, where did the salute originate from? Did the romans used the same, back in the day?
 
#17
From something I read many years ago, the nazi salute is a derivative of the one used by roman soldiers, ie the arm into the chest and straight out, as seen in "Rome" the TV series.

Also Kaiser the german word is taken from Ceasar and is pronounced more or less the same, not "seezar" as we say it.
 
#18
Evening chaps!

Yes it is a Roman salute, with the greeting of 'Ave' & all that, that's if my primary sources of reading Asterix comics as a schoolboy are to be believed :)

I understand that the bent arm salute was used by the SS & the straight arm as a general salute. See Black Edelweiss by Johan Voss, 2002.

You could also try asking these intellectual, historian-type chaps who have an unhealthy interest in that sort of thing:

http://forum.axishistory.com/

It appears they already have some threads on the subject:

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=45&t=6082

I remain your most humble servant, &tc.

~D.C.
 
#19
Dashing_Chap said:
Yes it is a Roman salute, with the greeting of 'Ave' & all that, that's if my primary sources of reading Asterix comics as a schoolboy are to be believed :)
From Wiki: "Hitler regarded the salute as a demonstration of the warlike spirit of the Germans, while Himmler regarded it as a variant of the gesture of giving an oath with a raised spear.

Such claims had some justification, since historians had long argued that similar gestures were used at the installation of ancient Germanic kings. Illustrations reconstructing such events, and showing the salute, date back to the mid nineteenth century.

The modern Brockhaus Encyclopedia also repeats these claims, stating that the salute derived from gestures used during the coronation of early medieval German kings along with exclamation of "Heil". According to the Nazis' Nordicist version of Aryan theory, the rulers of ancient Rome were themselves migrants from Northern Europe, and so, in their view, were likely to have brought the salute to Rome from Germany."
 

Latest Threads