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Nazi Commander's picture being used by DOD to recognize the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge

Day one of the Bulge?



Lt Lyle Bouck Jr. Found his platoon, the Intelligence and Recce Platoon of 394th Infantry Rgt (18 men, accompanied by 4 artillery observers) in Lanzerath, right in the path of the Germans. Held off a battalion for nigh on 24 hours, buggered up the German timetable, inflicted somewhere in the region of 100 German casualties before being finally outflanked and taken prisoner.

Because of their being taken PoW, the story of what the platoon did took years to properly emerge, and Bouck - and everyone else in the platoon - was decorated in 1981; Bouck getting a Distinguished Service Cross.

Not tricky to find a photo for someone to be representative of Day 1...

The trick, though, is to find a photo for someone on the very first post of Day 1, which is relevant to the story being told. Firstly, the post started out before Peiper gave the 'go' command, with his diary entry, so Lt Bouck has had no reason to hold off anything at that point. (The original post can still be viewed under the edit history, they were obviously going for a 'story-telling' vibe). Further, the Facebook page in question is that of the XVIII Airborne Corps, and what was important to the airborne units on 16th Dec was that the Germans had just slammed a couple hundred panzers into the US lines. What 394IR was doing kindof wasn't all that important to the paratroopers. The fact that Peiper was leading an operation which would unsettle the US as a whole, and lead to the redeployment of the Airborne, was a bit more relevant to the Airborne.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
With respect, of course they didn't. It was one of those operations that shouldn't have taken place but had to. To do nothing wasn't an option
The author Peter Elstob (a 3RTR (28 Armd Bde) Firefly commander and assigned to deny the Germans the use of a bridge) posited in his tome, Hitler's Last Offensive, that the only outcome of the offensive was to allow the Commies to advance another hundred miles west. Imagine the effect on all those thousands of Cold War Warriors.
 
The trick, though, is to find a photo for someone on the very first post of Day 1, which is relevant to the story being told. Firstly, the post started out before Peiper gave the 'go' command, with his diary entry, so Lt Bouck has had no reason to hold off anything at that point. (The original post can still be viewed under the edit history, they were obviously going for a 'story-telling' vibe). Further, the Facebook page in question is that of the XVIII Airborne Corps, and what was important to the airborne units on 16th Dec was that the Germans had just slammed a couple hundred panzers into the US lines. What 394IR was doing kindof wasn't all that important to the paratroopers. The fact that Peiper was leading an operation which would unsettle the US as a whole, and lead to the redeployment of the Airborne, was a bit more relevant to the Airborne.

In context, yes - just felt Bouck is a slightly more deserving candidate than Peiper for publicity (putting aside my historians's pedantry for a moment), particularly given that his story isn't that well known over here.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
The author Peter Elstob (a 3RTR (28 Armd Bde) Firefly commander and assigned to deny the Germans the use of a bridge) posited in his tome, Hitler's Last Offensive, that the only outcome of the offensive was to allow the Commies to advance another hundred miles west. Imagine the effect on all those thousands of Cold War Warriors.

Hmmm. The areas of occupation were defined before the Battle of the Bulge, which is why the Western Allies pulled back in some places (an American taskforce reached Colditz first) after the German surrender. We got further East faster than was expected.
 
The author Peter Elstob (a 3RTR (28 Armd Bde) Firefly commander and assigned to deny the Germans the use of a bridge) posited in his tome, Hitler's Last Offensive, that the only outcome of the offensive was to allow the Commies to advance another hundred miles west. Imagine the effect on all those thousands of Cold War Warriors.
Well look, I suspect you and I are of an age to understand that the only way for Germany was to win. If the Allies could be taken out then the entire resources could be shifted to fight the Russians. Don’t Forget that in December the Russians were on the Selow Heights about then but they hadn’t broken through to Berlin. But in reality by the time the sectorisation took place The Russians had taken Berlin. Timing was not in the allies favour. I suspect that Patton was bang on the money when he asked if we should turn our guns on the Russians. I don’t think the Russians could have taken on the Americans. But it was all a hell of a gamble. Being one of those CWWs myself I think a hundred mile head start for the Ruskies wouldn’t have been a good thing.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
We studied this particular operation at Camberley; as I recall (and from my own reading) Peiper took personal responsibility for the atrocity (it was his unit), but was not present when it happened.

Reports are still confused, but rather than being a pre-planned massacre, it may have started inadvertently when some of the US troops at the rear of the group of prisoners, seeing that the Germans were preoccupied with their vehicles, tried to make a run for nearby woods.

Seeing this, a German soldier opened fire on the fugitives with a pistol, which caused more prisoners to bolt and more Germans to start shooting. It turned from an unfortunate battlefield incident to a full blown War Crime when the Germans present decided to finish off the wounded.

Peiper himself was informed of the massacre shortly afterwards, when it was reported that a "mix-up" had occurred with some prisoners to the rear (no doubt avoidance of blame had already started)....
A good summation , I went on a battlefield tour of the route with Maj Gen Reynolds while he was in the Army . quite a bit of info came out
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
According to wiki , his house was firebombed in 1976 and his remains were found inside .....were thet really his remains ..tinfoil please...

Last years and death[edit]
In 1969, Peiper was a freelance contributor to the magazine Auto, Motor und Sport. In 1972 he moved to Traves in Haute-Saône, France, where he owned property. At that time he was a self-employed translator for the publisher Stuttgarter Motor-Buch Verlag. Under the pen name of "Rainer Buschmann", he translated books devoted to military history from English to German.[126]

Residing in France since 1972, Peiper led a quiet and discreet life; however, he continued to use his given name. In 1974, he was identified by a former Communist resistance member of the region who issued a report for the French Communist Party. In 1976, a Communist historian, investigating the Gestapo archives, found the Peiper file.[126] On 21 June, tracts denouncing his presence were distributed in Traves. A day later, an article in the communist newspaper L'Humanité revealed Peiper's presence in Traves and he received threats that his house would be burned down and his dogs killed.[127]

On receipt of these threats, Peiper, who remained in Traves, sent his family back to Germany. During the night of 13/14 July 1976 (Bastille Day), Peiper's home was attacked. In the ruins, Peiper's charred corpse was found together with a .22 calibre rifle and a pistol.[121] The perpetrators were never identified.[127]

Investigation found that intruders had cut a wire fence between the house and neighbouring properties. All three of Peiper's dogs had been wounded. Traces of shot and spent shell casings consistent with the rifle, shotgun and revolver Peiper had to protect himself with were found outside, suggesting he had fired at the intruders from outside the house. The intruders may not have been carrying firearms themselves; if they had been, they seem not to have fired them at all, since no bullets were found at the places Peiper had fired from.[127]

Instead, the attackers had thrown firebombs, including at least one Molotov cocktail, at the house to start the fire, which arson specialists found had been set in three locations at once. Just outside the house they found some clothing belonging to Peiper's wife as well as some personal papers, including his last letter to her, and a binocular. Peiper's body, burnt down to a mere 60 centimetres (24 in), was found in the remains of his study, where the papers would have been kept.[127]

Based on the evidence, investigators with the Dijon Police Judiciaire concluded that Peiper had heard the intruders enter his property and left the house to fire at them. When that did not prevent the firebombing, he returned to the house in an attempt to save his and his wife's valuables by throwing them out the study window, continuing to fire at the attackers outside. While the body was too badly burned to determine the exact cause of death, the official conclusion was that he died of smoke inhalation in the attempt and not at the hands of the attackers.[127]

Erwin Ketelhut, a former LSSAH artillery captain who had rented the house to his wartime commander, identified the remains the morning after the fire. Sigurd Peiper wanted her husband's body buried in Germany, so it was transported back there, where by law a post-mortem had to be performed. His head was initially missing; when it arrived later it had been cut into sections, splitting the only remaining tooth. Joachim Peiper is buried with his family at St Anna's Church in the Bavarian village of Schondorf am Ammersee.[127]

A group calling itself The Avengers claimed responsibility for his death; the charred remains of the house briefly became a visitor attraction. The circumstances of his death have led to allegations that it was faked.[127
The French have always fared better against unarmed Germans than armed Germans
 
Can’t get excited about it. The main US website is using an image of a bizarre orange-haired posturing racist shithead against the role of ‘Commander in Chief’. Makes the use of Peiper’s fizzog pale into insignificance...
 

windswept398

Old-Salt
Weird posting a picture of the enemy though. What they going to post for the fifty years anniversary of Desert Storm? Picture of Saddam Hussein?
 
According to wiki , his house was firebombed in 1976 and his remains were found inside .....were thet really his remains ..tinfoil please...

Last years and death[edit]
In 1969, Peiper was a freelance contributor to the magazine Auto, Motor und Sport. In 1972 he moved to Traves in Haute-Saône, France, where he owned property. At that time he was a self-employed translator for the publisher Stuttgarter Motor-Buch Verlag. Under the pen name of "Rainer Buschmann", he translated books devoted to military history from English to German.[126]

Residing in France since 1972, Peiper led a quiet and discreet life; however, he continued to use his given name. In 1974, he was identified by a former Communist resistance member of the region who issued a report for the French Communist Party. In 1976, a Communist historian, investigating the Gestapo archives, found the Peiper file.[126] On 21 June, tracts denouncing his presence were distributed in Traves. A day later, an article in the communist newspaper L'Humanité revealed Peiper's presence in Traves and he received threats that his house would be burned down and his dogs killed.[127]

On receipt of these threats, Peiper, who remained in Traves, sent his family back to Germany. During the night of 13/14 July 1976 (Bastille Day), Peiper's home was attacked. In the ruins, Peiper's charred corpse was found together with a .22 calibre rifle and a pistol.[121] The perpetrators were never identified.[127]

Investigation found that intruders had cut a wire fence between the house and neighbouring properties. All three of Peiper's dogs had been wounded. Traces of shot and spent shell casings consistent with the rifle, shotgun and revolver Peiper had to protect himself with were found outside, suggesting he had fired at the intruders from outside the house. The intruders may not have been carrying firearms themselves; if they had been, they seem not to have fired them at all, since no bullets were found at the places Peiper had fired from.[127]

Instead, the attackers had thrown firebombs, including at least one Molotov cocktail, at the house to start the fire, which arson specialists found had been set in three locations at once. Just outside the house they found some clothing belonging to Peiper's wife as well as some personal papers, including his last letter to her, and a binocular. Peiper's body, burnt down to a mere 60 centimetres (24 in), was found in the remains of his study, where the papers would have been kept.[127]

Based on the evidence, investigators with the Dijon Police Judiciaire concluded that Peiper had heard the intruders enter his property and left the house to fire at them. When that did not prevent the firebombing, he returned to the house in an attempt to save his and his wife's valuables by throwing them out the study window, continuing to fire at the attackers outside. While the body was too badly burned to determine the exact cause of death, the official conclusion was that he died of smoke inhalation in the attempt and not at the hands of the attackers.[127]

Erwin Ketelhut, a former LSSAH artillery captain who had rented the house to his wartime commander, identified the remains the morning after the fire. Sigurd Peiper wanted her husband's body buried in Germany, so it was transported back there, where by law a post-mortem had to be performed. His head was initially missing; when it arrived later it had been cut into sections, splitting the only remaining tooth. Joachim Peiper is buried with his family at St Anna's Church in the Bavarian village of Schondorf am Ammersee.[127]

A group calling itself The Avengers claimed responsibility for his death; the charred remains of the house briefly became a visitor attraction. The circumstances of his death have led to allegations that it was faked.[127
The French have always fared better against unarmed Germans than armed Germans
ODHSNM.jpg
 

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