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Nazi Commander's picture being used by DOD to recognize the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge

tiger stacker

On ROPS
On ROPs
Day one of the Bulge?



Lt Lyle Bouck Jr. Found his platoon, the Intelligence and Recce Platoon of 394th Infantry Rgt (18 men, accompanied by 4 artillery observers) in Lanzerath, right in the path of the Germans. Held off a battalion for nigh on 24 hours, buggered up the German timetable, inflicted somewhere in the region of 100 German casualties before being finally outflanked and taken prisoner.

Because of their being taken PoW, the story of what the platoon did took years to properly emerge, and Bouck - and everyone else in the platoon - was decorated in 1981; Bouck getting a Distinguished Service Cross.

Not tricky to find a photo for someone to be representative of Day 1...
Joining the Guard at 14 must have been a story in itself…...
 
“I was a Nazi and I remain one…. The Germany of today is no longer a great nation, it has become a province of Europe. That is why, at the first opportunity, I shall settle elsewhere, in France no doubt. I don’t particularly care for Frenchmen, but I love France. Of all things, the materialism of my compatriots causes me pain.” - Lt. Col Joachim Peiper 1967
I wonder what he would have thought about the European Union if he had lived to see that? Frau Merkel almost as good as Der Fuehrer?
Ironic that he met his end in fire under mysterious circumstances on Bastille Day 1976. In France.
 
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Joining the Guard at 14 must have been a story in itself…...
in the 30's many States guard units turned a blind eye to underage soldiers trying to earn for their families

However Senator Mike Mansfield served in the USN during WW1 @ age 12 aboard USS Minneapolis. He then served in the US Army and USMC (China and Philippines) before age 19
 
Peiper was NOT in overall charge, he commanded a battlegroup of 1st LSSAH division smaller than a brigade in strength.

Those in overall charge of the operation were Field Marshals Model and von Rundstedt. However it would have been inappropriate to display either of them as leaders of the operation because neither of them believed in it. Model had been heard to say quite a few times he gave the plan, "No more than a one in ten chance of success," while von Rundstedt seems to have found some out of the way spot where for most of the time he read detective novels (he was rather fond of the genre.)

The only ones fully acquainted with the facts who did believe in the plan were probably only the younger Nazi fanatics like Peiper, anyway. Even the old warhorse Sepp Dietrich thought Hitler no longer had all his cups in his cupboard at this point. Dietrich pointed out sarcastically all he had to do was cross a couple of rivers, somehow obtain enough fuel to keep going, all the while 'cross-graining,' the countryside in the worst weather conditions imaginable. Oh, and he had to take the port of Antwerp as well ...
 
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in the 30's many States guard units turned a blind eye to underage soldiers trying to earn for their families

However Senator Mike Mansfield served in the USN during WW1 @ age 12 aboard USS Minneapolis. He then served in the US Army and USMC (China and Philippines) before age 19


'China Marines'?, Ah, Killer Kelly - I always enjoyed reading the USMC Novels by W.E.B Griffin for a bit of believable escapism.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Monty even more so- shame he couldn’t resist rubbing our US friends’ noses in it. For that reason he’s less likely to appear in this remembrance than a Nazi murderer.
To be honest about the interview what the Americans heard and read wasn’t accurate and is a great example of propaganda misquoting the enemy to great effect although altering the speech worked it didn’t alter the way the war ended
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
#
The responsibility for Malmedy is a bit grey.Some disputed evidence at the trial See The Devil's Adjudant by Mike Reynoldspp 252-259

We studied this particular operation at Camberley; as I recall (and from my own reading) Peiper took personal responsibility for the atrocity (it was his unit), but was not present when it happened.

Reports are still confused, but rather than being a pre-planned massacre, it may have started inadvertently when some of the US troops at the rear of the group of prisoners, seeing that the Germans were preoccupied with their vehicles, tried to make a run for nearby woods.

Seeing this, a German soldier opened fire on the fugitives with a pistol, which caused more prisoners to bolt and more Germans to start shooting. It turned from an unfortunate battlefield incident to a full blown War Crime when the Germans present decided to finish off the wounded.

Peiper himself was informed of the massacre shortly afterwards, when it was reported that a "mix-up" had occurred with some prisoners to the rear (no doubt avoidance of blame had already started)....
 
We studied this particular operation at Camberley; as I recall (and from my own reading) Peiper took personal responsibility for the atrocity (it was his unit), but was not present when it happened.

Reports are still confused, but rather than being a pre-planned massacre, it may have started inadvertently when some of the US troops at the rear of the group of prisoners, seeing that the Germans were preoccupied with their vehicles, tried to make a run for nearby woods.

Seeing this, a German soldier opened fire on the fugitives with a pistol, which caused more prisoners to bolt and more Germans to start shooting. It turned from an unfortunate battlefield incident to a full blown War Crime when the Germans present decided to finish off the wounded.

Peiper himself was informed of the massacre shortly afterwards, when it was reported that a "mix-up" had occurred with some prisoners to the rear (no doubt avoidance of blame had already started)....
Peiper did have a run in with a major Hal McCown of the 2nd Bn/119th Infantry who he took as POW. he took pains to show and assure McCown no US POW would be harmed. During the retreat McCown escaped from Peipers column and later testified at his trial

 
Peiper took personal responsibility for the atrocity (it was his unit), but was not present when it happened.

Rightly so; an officer is ultimately responsible for the conduct of his soldiers and I think that would be the same in the British Army to this day?

It seems a plausible enough explanation and it may well be the reason why, even though Peiper was convicted and sentenced to death by an American court-martial after the war, his death sentence was commuted.
 
According to wiki , his house was firebombed in 1976 and his remains were found inside .....were thet really his remains ..tinfoil please...

Last years and death[edit]
In 1969, Peiper was a freelance contributor to the magazine Auto, Motor und Sport. In 1972 he moved to Traves in Haute-Saône, France, where he owned property. At that time he was a self-employed translator for the publisher Stuttgarter Motor-Buch Verlag. Under the pen name of "Rainer Buschmann", he translated books devoted to military history from English to German.[126]

Residing in France since 1972, Peiper led a quiet and discreet life; however, he continued to use his given name. In 1974, he was identified by a former Communist resistance member of the region who issued a report for the French Communist Party. In 1976, a Communist historian, investigating the Gestapo archives, found the Peiper file.[126] On 21 June, tracts denouncing his presence were distributed in Traves. A day later, an article in the communist newspaper L'Humanité revealed Peiper's presence in Traves and he received threats that his house would be burned down and his dogs killed.[127]

On receipt of these threats, Peiper, who remained in Traves, sent his family back to Germany. During the night of 13/14 July 1976 (Bastille Day), Peiper's home was attacked. In the ruins, Peiper's charred corpse was found together with a .22 calibre rifle and a pistol.[121] The perpetrators were never identified.[127]

Investigation found that intruders had cut a wire fence between the house and neighbouring properties. All three of Peiper's dogs had been wounded. Traces of shot and spent shell casings consistent with the rifle, shotgun and revolver Peiper had to protect himself with were found outside, suggesting he had fired at the intruders from outside the house. The intruders may not have been carrying firearms themselves; if they had been, they seem not to have fired them at all, since no bullets were found at the places Peiper had fired from.[127]

Instead, the attackers had thrown firebombs, including at least one Molotov cocktail, at the house to start the fire, which arson specialists found had been set in three locations at once. Just outside the house they found some clothing belonging to Peiper's wife as well as some personal papers, including his last letter to her, and a binocular. Peiper's body, burnt down to a mere 60 centimetres (24 in), was found in the remains of his study, where the papers would have been kept.[127]

Based on the evidence, investigators with the Dijon Police Judiciaire concluded that Peiper had heard the intruders enter his property and left the house to fire at them. When that did not prevent the firebombing, he returned to the house in an attempt to save his and his wife's valuables by throwing them out the study window, continuing to fire at the attackers outside. While the body was too badly burned to determine the exact cause of death, the official conclusion was that he died of smoke inhalation in the attempt and not at the hands of the attackers.[127]

Erwin Ketelhut, a former LSSAH artillery captain who had rented the house to his wartime commander, identified the remains the morning after the fire. Sigurd Peiper wanted her husband's body buried in Germany, so it was transported back there, where by law a post-mortem had to be performed. His head was initially missing; when it arrived later it had been cut into sections, splitting the only remaining tooth. Joachim Peiper is buried with his family at St Anna's Church in the Bavarian village of Schondorf am Ammersee.[127]

A group calling itself The Avengers claimed responsibility for his death; the charred remains of the house briefly became a visitor attraction. The circumstances of his death have led to allegations that it was faked.[127
 
Monty even more so- shame he couldn’t resist rubbing our US friends’ noses in it. For that reason he’s less likely to appear in this remembrance than a Nazi murderer.
As has been pointed out elsewhere, the Americans got the message of Monte's view through the Germans. Talk about fake news being unfiltered.
 
Those in overall charge of the operation were Field Marshals Model and von Rundstedt. However it would have been inappropriate to display either of them as leaders of the operation because neither of them believed in it.
With respect, of course they didn't. It was one of those operations that shouldn't have taken place but had to. To do nothing wasn't an option
 

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