Nautical Archaeology Thread

Awol

LE
Interesting indeed!
National Geographic Society (US) has just published an online article based on the work of TIGHAR looking at radio transmissions from Amelia Earhart after her plane went down. They look at the nature of claimed receptions of messages and evaluate the time of transmissions with the tide levels on the reef. The plane's primary radio frequency was 3105kHz but some receptions were clearly on harmonics that were received on "skip" . The analysis is pretty convincing that Earhart and her navigator survived the crash for several days.

The main article is at:
National Geo article

The TIGHAR article on the radio analysis is here:
Earhart radio

One thing not mentioned in the article is the conditions at the time for skip propagation such as sunspot activity. Clearly the signals propagated via skip. Another thing I noticed was that their radio was voice only with no provision to transmit morse on CW. CW can punch a signal through.

Skip is an odd thing for radio users. Many years ago I was driving late at night in Massachusetts and came across a bad accident with injured people entrapped. This was many years before cell phones (back when dinosaurs roamed Massachusetts). I was a Red Cross disaster volunteer and had a radio on the national Red Cross frequency (47.42MHz , clear channel). I called Red Cross Boston, nothing! I then tried two other Red Cross Chapters in Mass., nothing. Suddenly a strong signal came in "Red Cross unit 76D calling Red Cross, can we help" I described the problem and a need to call fire and police and got "erm..what state are you in". It turns out that I was talking to the Chicago chapter HQ over 1000 miles away. They got back to me and said that had called Massachusetts State Police and help was on the way. After fire and police arrived I tried to call Chicago back to say thanks and got absolutely nothing!
It did make me appreciate the benefit of the Red Cross having one frequency in every ARC vehicle and radio.
CW?
 
Continuous Wave.

'Now simply called "CW", radio communication by Morse code was the only way to communicate for the first decade or more of Amateur Radio. Radiotelegraphy, the proper name, descends from landline (wired) telegraphy of the 19th century, and retains some of the old culture, including a rich set of abbreviations and procedures. Morse sent by spark gap transmitter was the first wireless communication mode. These "damped waves" were very broad and inefficient for communication. They were soon replaced by "Continuous Wave" (CW) transmission, using vacuum tube oscillators that were capable of a very pure note. Today, modern Amateur Radio transceivers use solid state components and microprocessors to support a variety of communication modes including CW, voice, image and many digital data modes.'

CW Mode
 
Not sure if this counts as Nautical.
TV historian Dan Snow has done a dive in a flooded Quarry on the Island of Alderney. It seems at the end of WW2, during the clean up of the Island, the British Army used it as a dump!
Records show there's at least one Tank, munitions, guns several cars. But whats really getting people interested, is that there could be up to eight K18 172.5mm artillery pieces, these things had a range of up to 18 miles.
 
While the headline is news-grabbingly alarmist, the current state of play is considerably less concerning.

'Using a robotic sub, a team of investigators has detected traces of radiation leaking from Komsomolets – a Soviet nuclear submarine that sank 30 years ago in the Norwegian Sea. The recorded radiation levels are unusually high, but scientists say it’s not threatening humans or marine life.

'On April 7, 1989, while cruising at a depth of 380 metres (1,250 feet), a fire broke out in the aft section of Komsomolets, a Soviet nuclear-powered attack submarine out on its first patrol. Its captain managed to bring the beleaguered sub to the surface, but it sank about five hours later. All 42 sailors were killed in the incident, known as the Komsomolets disaster.

'The 120 metre-long (400-foot) nuclear submarine still rests some 1,700 metres (5,575 feet) below the surface of the Norwegian Sea, about 320 kilometres (200 miles) north of the Norwegian mainland. And it’s leaking radiation, according to a press release issued by Norway’s Institute of Marine Research (IMR). The amount of cesium radiation leaking from the wreck is significant, at about 800,000 times the typical reading for the Norwegian Sea, but it “poses no risk to people or fish,” according to a collaborative research team involving IMR and the Norwegian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (DSA).'


A Sunken Cold War Nuclear Sub Is Leaking Radiation at Levels 800,000 Times Normal
 
Military divers are clearing shells from iron ore carriers sunk off Bell Island by German U-boats during WWII. The shells are from the ships' guns fitted for self defence.
www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/bell-island-explosives-sweep-ocean-quest-1.5211848?cmp=rss


Military divers will set out to retrieve the unexploded explosive ordnance from the rusting wrecks of the four iron ore carriers: the Lord Strathcona and Rose Castle from Canada, France's PLM 27 and Britain's Saganaga.
Bell Isle is just off the coast of the island of Newfoundland, and the iron ore from the mines there was used to feed the steel mills of Sydney Nova Scotia. The wrecks are popular with divers today. The gun shown above is on the wreck of the British ship Saganaga.
Burgess has also spotted artillery shells lying on the deck near the stern gun. The ships, carrying iron ore from Bell Island's mines to steel mills in Sydney, N.S., to be made into war goods, had been outfitted with artillery guns to prepare for German attack.

Burgess, who's also president of the Shipwreck Preservation Society of Newfoundland and Labrador, estimates there are about 50 shells on each wreck. He provided the team behind this week's dives with old plans of the ships to help map out retrieval efforts.

The dives are scheduled to run from July 15 through July 24. The artillery will then be taken to a shooting range about 45 minutes west of St. John's to be detonated.


I find it very interesting that they're still clearing up stuff like this years later even in Canada where the war had a lot less direct impact than it did in Europe.
 

endure

GCM
Interesting indeed!
National Geographic Society (US) has just published an online article based on the work of TIGHAR looking at radio transmissions from Amelia Earhart after her plane went down. They look at the nature of claimed receptions of messages and evaluate the time of transmissions with the tide levels on the reef. The plane's primary radio frequency was 3105kHz but some receptions were clearly on harmonics that were received on "skip" . The analysis is pretty convincing that Earhart and her navigator survived the crash for several days.

The main article is at:
National Geo article

The TIGHAR article on the radio analysis is here:
Earhart radio

One thing not mentioned in the article is the conditions at the time for skip propagation such as sunspot activity. Clearly the signals propagated via skip. Another thing I noticed was that their radio was voice only with no provision to transmit morse on CW. CW can punch a signal through.

Skip is an odd thing for radio users. Many years ago I was driving late at night in Massachusetts and came across a bad accident with injured people entrapped. This was many years before cell phones (back when dinosaurs roamed Massachusetts). I was a Red Cross disaster volunteer and had a radio on the national Red Cross frequency (47.42MHz , clear channel).
50Mhz is the Magic Band - half HF half VHF so you get skywave a la HF and the occasional tropospheric ducting a la VHF.
 
Amazing images!
If you go to YouTube, Dr Robert Ballard of Titanic fame and the MME with Southampton University, have been at different times, been doing deep water exploration of the Black Sea. The amount of Wrecks in near intact condition is astounding. One wreck is older than Alexander the Great, approximately 4,000 years old. They should all be available on YouTube.
 
If you go to YouTube, Dr Robert Ballard of Titanic fame and the MME with Southampton University, have been at different times, been doing deep water exploration of the Black Sea. The amount of Wrecks in near intact condition is astounding. One wreck is older than Alexander the Great, approximately 4,000 years old. They should all be available on YouTube.
thanks, will check that out.
DBOC
 
If you go to YouTube, Dr Robert Ballard of Titanic fame and the MME with Southampton University, have been at different times, been doing deep water exploration of the Black Sea. The amount of Wrecks in near intact condition is astounding. One wreck is older than Alexander the Great, approximately 4,000 years old. They should all be available on YouTube.
Not quiet 4000 years. But Sherman's from SS Empire Heritage sunk of the North Irish coast WW2.

1564010999123.png

1564011041024.png
 

Attachments

Interesting indeed!
National Geographic Society (US) has just published an online article based on the work of TIGHAR looking at radio transmissions from Amelia Earhart after her plane went down. They look at the nature of claimed receptions of messages and evaluate the time of transmissions with the tide levels on the reef. The plane's primary radio frequency was 3105kHz but some receptions were clearly on harmonics that were received on "skip" . The analysis is pretty convincing that Earhart and her navigator survived the crash for several days.

The main article is at:
National Geo article

The TIGHAR article on the radio analysis is here:
Earhart radio

One thing not mentioned in the article is the conditions at the time for skip propagation such as sunspot activity. Clearly the signals propagated via skip. Another thing I noticed was that their radio was voice only with no provision to transmit morse on CW. CW can punch a signal through.

Skip is an odd thing for radio users. Many years ago I was driving late at night in Massachusetts and came across a bad accident with injured people entrapped. This was many years before cell phones (back when dinosaurs roamed Massachusetts). I was a Red Cross disaster volunteer and had a radio on the national Red Cross frequency (47.42MHz , clear channel). I called Red Cross Boston, nothing! I then tried two other Red Cross Chapters in Mass., nothing. Suddenly a strong signal came in "Red Cross unit 76D calling Red Cross, can we help" I described the problem and a need to call fire and police and got "erm..what state are you in". It turns out that I was talking to the Chicago chapter HQ over 1000 miles away. They got back to me and said that had called Massachusetts State Police and help was on the way. After fire and police arrived I tried to call Chicago back to say thanks and got absolutely nothing!
It did make me appreciate the benefit of the Red Cross having one frequency in every ARC vehicle and radio.
Further upcoming developments in the ongoing search for Amelia Earhart.

'Next week, world-famous wreck hunter Robert Ballard hopes he will be the one to find conclusive evidence of Earhart and Noonan’s fate.

'On August 7, his exploration vessel Nautilus will depart Samoa for the cluster of islands that is the Micronesian nation Kiribati. One particular uninhabited speck — one of the remotest places on the planet — is their destination. Nikumaroro.

'Ballard’s team will be searching on both sea and land. The expedition is funded to last one month. Advanced sonar will map the ocean floor in search of ‘solid’ objects. Robotic drones with cameras will zoom in on potential contacts for a closer look. It’s not as easy as it sounds: the coral reef quickly plunges 3000m to the sea floor, which is itself a maze of volcanic gullies and valleys. Ballard says he will be searching one site in particular — a “very high energy” beach where the collision of open sea with solid reef would quickly grind an aircraft into pieces.

'Meanwhile, search teams and forensic dogs will scour the rough coral beaches, bushes and dunes. With the team will be archaeologist Fredrik Hiebert. In particular, he will be seeking any evidence of human remains — along with any aircraft parts that can be explicitly traced back to a Lockheed Electra.'


 
A Parks Canada research team are now en route to the site of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror to continue their archaeological program.
A Parks Canada research team is en route to the underwater wrecks of Sir John Franklin's ships in an effort to uncover more truths of what happened on the infamous and ill-fated expedition to find the Northwest Passage.

This year's archeological exploration plan of the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror that were lost for nearly 170 years is being called the "largest, most complex underwater archeological undertaking in Canadian history" by government officials in a public announcement Friday.
This years plans involve excavating the officer's cabins in HMS Erebus, where Franklin had his cabin. For HMS Terror they plan to do 3D structural mapping and an exploration of the interior with a camera mounted on an ROV.
Research goals for 2019 include excavation of officer's cabins and the lower deck of the HMS Erebus, where Franklin had his cabin. Archeological activities at the more-recently-discovered and better-preserved HMS Terror are set to focus on 3D structural mapping and an exploration of the interior with an HD camera mounted to a remotely operated vehicle.
They will be using Canada's newest research vessel, the "David Thompson" (converted from a fisheries patrol vessel).


Here's the site of the wrecks. The land to the south and east is the mainland. To the west is the eastern tip of Victoria Island, which is roughly the size of the UK. Just off the map to the right is the northern end of Baffin Island.
 

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