Nautical Archaeology Thread

Another Dutch discovery, with incredibly well-preserved artefacts.

'Sometimes, shipwrecks appear out of what seems to be merely sand. For more than 350 years, a ship lay unseen just off the Dutch island of Texel in the southeastern part of the North Sea, known as the Wadden Sea.

'Hidden for centuries at a depth of nearly 30 feet, the so-called Burgzand Noord 17 wreck unexpectedly materialized on the seabed several years ago. A bit of the vessel and some artifacts were first spotted by members of a local amateur diving club in 2009, but it was not until 2014 that more of the ship and its cargo began to emerge. Because of the shifting nature of the seafloor and the need to protect the wreck and its contents from further illegal exploration, the artifacts from the site—which would eventually number more than 1,000—were quickly removed.'

Global Cargo - Archaeology Magazine
 
Moving sands do strange things. I used to fly over the Solway Firth ( for work) nearly every day for five years, and got to know ( I thought) all the landmarks.
One afternoon in spring 1998 whilst flying offshore of Anthorn I spotted an outline of what looked a bit like an aircraft wing. Over the next 3 or four tides this revealed itself to be what I found out to be a Lockheed Hudson ( one of quite a few that ditched after engine failure after taking off from silloth.
A couple of us were going to head out in a boat at low tide for a gander when Dave Couling who flew from Kirkbride, ( and an EOD man) spelt out to us what fifty plus years of salt water was likely to have done to the fuzeing on the various bangy things on board.
We listened to him rather than the emperor and the sands reclaimed their own again within a couple more tides. To reappear no doubt at some time in the future.!
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Not archaeology as such, but an interesting piece of maritime history about to be lost, as one of the 3 remaining Foxtrot-Class submarines is about to be scrapped.

'After more than 20 years, the former Soviet submarine B-143 Foxtrot has left its berth in the port of Zeebrugge, heading for the breaker’s yard in Ghent.'

Soviet sub leaves Zeebrugge after 23 years as museum attraction
 
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Moving sands do strange things. I used to fly over the Solway Firth ( for work) nearly every day for five years, and got to know ( I thought) all the landmarks.
One afternoon in spring 1998 whilst flying offshore of Anthorn I spotted an outline of what looked a bit like an aircraft wing. Over the next 3 or four tides this revealed itself to be what I found out to be a Lockheed Hudson ( one of quite a few that ditched after engine failure after taking off from silloth.
A couple of us were going to head out in a boat at low tide for a gander when Dave Couling who flew from Kirkbride, ( and an EOD man) spelt out to us what fifty plus years of salt water was likely to have done to the fuzeing on the various bangy things on board.
We listened to him rather than the emperor and the sands reclaimed their own again within a couple more tides. To reappear no doubt at some time in the future.!
1560939019661.png

This Corsair is on mud flats in Lough Foyle. Not a million miles from the old Shackleton Bks.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Rae took Halkett boats on a couple of explorations.
Returned with one to Orkney. It was found up in the rafters of a house and is now on display in Stromness museum.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Stromness museum has both a life size display and an original Halkett boat
download.jpeg.jpg
STromness-museum-Halkett-boat_1.jpg
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
www.tighar.org

Although somewhat fixated (and the evidence suggests they may have good reason to be) with Amelia Earhart, their other projects are equally fascinating. My favourite is the French aircraft l'Oiseau Blanc, which disappeared in 1927, and which may be lying hidden in a Newfoundland bog somewhere.

Interesting stuff.
Interesting indeed!
National Geographic Society (US) has just published an online article based on the work of TIGHAR looking at radio transmissions from Amelia Earhart after her plane went down. They look at the nature of claimed receptions of messages and evaluate the time of transmissions with the tide levels on the reef. The plane's primary radio frequency was 3105kHz but some receptions were clearly on harmonics that were received on "skip" . The analysis is pretty convincing that Earhart and her navigator survived the crash for several days.

The main article is at:
National Geo article

The TIGHAR article on the radio analysis is here:
Earhart radio

One thing not mentioned in the article is the conditions at the time for skip propagation such as sunspot activity. Clearly the signals propagated via skip. Another thing I noticed was that their radio was voice only with no provision to transmit morse on CW. CW can punch a signal through.

Skip is an odd thing for radio users. Many years ago I was driving late at night in Massachusetts and came across a bad accident with injured people entrapped. This was many years before cell phones (back when dinosaurs roamed Massachusetts). I was a Red Cross disaster volunteer and had a radio on the national Red Cross frequency (47.42MHz , clear channel). I called Red Cross Boston, nothing! I then tried two other Red Cross Chapters in Mass., nothing. Suddenly a strong signal came in "Red Cross unit 76D calling Red Cross, can we help" I described the problem and a need to call fire and police and got "erm..what state are you in". It turns out that I was talking to the Chicago chapter HQ over 1000 miles away. They got back to me and said that had called Massachusetts State Police and help was on the way. After fire and police arrived I tried to call Chicago back to say thanks and got absolutely nothing!
It did make me appreciate the benefit of the Red Cross having one frequency in every ARC vehicle and radio.
 
On my Google news feed yesterday, it seem two more Dutch war graves have been desecrated. The Nederlands apparently signed a deal with Indonesia to protect their sunken Wargraves. Looks to have been a waste of time. 90% of one ship gone, a Dutch Submarine all that's left is its excavation shadow. Chinese again no doubt!
 
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