Nautical Archaeology Thread

#81
www.tighar.org

Although somewhat fixated (and the evidence suggests they may have good reason to be) with Amelia Earhart, their other projects are equally fascinating. My favourite is the French aircraft l'Oiseau Blanc, which disappeared in 1927, and which may be lying hidden in a Newfoundland bog somewhere.

Interesting stuff.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#83
Fancy that! The father of tabloid journalism got something right (after 2 1/2 millennia).
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#85
I wish they'd give a nice drawing of the ship-building technique; I still have no idea from those murky photos what Herodotus was trying to describe.
Even I'm trying to work it out, could be a long groove down the length of each edge of the plank with a loose tongue fitted or loose tensions spaced at regular intervals with mortices in the upper and lower edges of each plank, which are then draw pegged to close the seam
 
#86
Even I'm trying to work it out, could be a long groove down the length of each edge of the plank with a loose tongue fitted or loose tensions spaced at regular intervals with mortices in the upper and lower edges of each plank, which are then draw pegged to close the seam
It sounds like a version of carvel building, but using mortice and tenon joints like garden decking. There was probably no keel, so it was built with the hull as the outer shell, then the ribbing put in after.
 
#87
Not quite military, 'cos the Vikings were just misunderstood traders, but interesting nonetheless.

'Traces of a buried Viking ship have been detected in a burial site in the Vestfold county in Norway. The rare discovery, which has been declared a “historic” moment, was made in a grave in Borreparken and could shed light on the skilled navigators’ expeditions in the Middle Ages.

'Only three Viking ships in good condition have been discovered in Norway in the past, including the well-preserved Oseberg ship discovered in 1903. All three of them are now exhibited in a museum near Oslo.

'National Geographic reports archaeologists had thought any remains in the local fields would have long since been destroyed by farmers’ ploughs. But this survey using ground-penetrating radar found evidence about eight more large graves — some 27m across — as well as the outline of the 20m longboat’s hull.'

Norway’s stunning burial site discovery
 
#88
Baia underwater archaeological site, a town that sank following an earthquake, near Pozzuoli (Naples area) is extremely interesting and a great dive.
My son dived there as part of a team restoring a mosaic in situ.
 
#89
Baia underwater archaeological site, a town that sank following an earthquake, near Pozzuoli (Naples area) is extremely interesting and a great dive.
My son dived there as part of a team restoring a mosaic in situ.
And for those who don't want to get their feet wet, there's some pretty substantial ruins still located behind the shoreline and on the low cliffs.

 
#91
After being remarkably well preserved for 170 years, HMS Erebus is beginning to suffer damage from bad weather. Arctic ice crumbling HMS Erebus and blocking divers from researching the wreck | CBC News
"One of the main findings this year is that Erebus has deteriorated significantly," Jarred Picher, Parks Canada director of archaeology and history, reported on Sept. 18.
"An idea to consider is perhaps the research focus should be on Erebus now while research on the Terror is delayed … we are two years behind schedule on Erebus, have not even started on Terror."
Adverse weather last year limited the amount of of work that could be done.

Swells act against the wreck even though it's submerged by bouying up the decking. Part of the deck has been displaced and deck beams are separating.
"An upwards buoyant force acting on the decking combined with storm swell in relatively shallow water caused the displacement," said Stephanie McGlashan, a Parks Canada spokesperson.
"The shifting of this deck section resulted in the detached windlass [a kind of winch] also being moved. In addition, several upper deck beams were noted to have separated from the underlying beam shelf in this area …"
Work this year on HMS Erebus is being given priority, as it lies at 11 to 21 metres depth while HMS Terror is twice as deep and so is less exposed to storm damage.
Ryan Harris, Parks Canada senior underwater archaeologist, has said the agency will be "prioritizing" the investigation of HMS Erebus — which is relatively exposed in 11 to 12 metres of water — over that of HMS Terror, which is much more intact and — because it's sitting in water twice as deep — is not as threatened by storm swells.
No skeletal remains of any of the crew have been found so far.
So far, no skeletal remains of any crew members have been found, though mitochondrial DNA was successfully recovered from a boot found in an earlier search. The analysis could not be precise about the geographical origins of the man who once wore the boot.
Not discussed in detail in the story is that summer ice has been disappearing rapidly in recent years in the Arctic. This results in more open water, which in turn produces more waves as the wind now has open water to act on. This may possibly have some relation to the recent more rapid deterioration of HMS Erebus. The increased wave action is causing rapid erosion of shorelines which had previously been stable, threatening land based archaeological sites as well.





There are two threads about HMS Erebus and HMS Terror where more details about these ships can be found. I am posting the story here rather than reviving those threads however as those threads have been dormant for nearly a year.

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/hms-erebus-or-hms-terror.218922/
https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/t...k-gifts-historic-shipwrecks-to-canada.276550/
 
#92
Thanks for that. I read these developments with interest and had wondered what had happened to the other thread. My search skills are a bit special needsey , I am afraid.

Good post.
 
#94
Was there any truth in the rumours that the Canadians were considering recovering the Terror, as she is the most complete?
There's no plans to recover either ship at this time, just selected artefacts. The climatic conditions are too difficult and unpredictable to make that practical. Raising either ship intact with today's technology would require a longer period of favourable summer weather than is available.

If you read the story provided in my previous link you will see that last year, out of a planned six week diving program they only got two days on HMS Erebus and none on HMS Terror.
 
#96
Couldn't agree more about Vasa; cutting edge marine archaeology for the time, and an amazing piece of history to see. Meanwhile, to the south-west, shifting sands ...

'Dutch maritime investigators searching for missing containers washed overboard during a North Sea storm have accidentally stumbled on a 16th-century shipwreck, the oldest such a find to date, officials revealed on Wednesday. The ancient wreck was discovered during a search for missing containers from the Panama-registered MSC Zoe, which lost almost 350 containers while battling a heavy storm in early January.

'Tonnes of debris littered beaches on the Frisian islands, an archipelago off the northern Dutch coast, after the mishap. But while scouring a busy shipping lane for the missing containers, salvage crews found copper plates and wooden beams from a vessel with a smooth hull approximately 30 metres (98 feet long).
"It's the oldest sea-going ship ever found in Dutch waters," the country's science and culture ministry said in a statement. "An immediate archaeological survey was started and researchers determined the wood dated from 1536," the Hague-based ministry said. It added that the ship was built around 1540 during the reign of Charles V and had been carrying a load of copper plates dated from around the same period.'


Dutch container search reveals rare ancient shipwreck
 
#97
Not a ship, but certainly a wreck (at least in terms of the idea that dumping at sea doesn't have consequences).

'A dumping ground for munitions from the First World War off the coast of Knokke has been subject to leaks of mustard gas, according to federal minister for the North Sea, Philippe De Backer.

'Tests had been carried out at the Paardenmarkt sandbank off the coast of Knokke at the end of last year. The sandbank is the burial ground for about 35,000 tonnes of munitions, some of whose contents had been found to leach into the seawater.'

The Brussels Times - Leaks of mustard gas off North Sea coast revealed
 
#98
Not a ship, but certainly a wreck (at least in terms of the idea that dumping at sea doesn't have consequences).

'A dumping ground for munitions from the First World War off the coast of Knokke has been subject to leaks of mustard gas, according to federal minister for the North Sea, Philippe De Backer.

'Tests had been carried out at the Paardenmarkt sandbank off the coast of Knokke at the end of last year. The sandbank is the burial ground for about 35,000 tonnes of munitions, some of whose contents had been found to leach into the seawater.'

The Brussels Times - Leaks of mustard gas off North Sea coast revealed
That's going to take some clearing up. Remember the trouble that they went too, with the UBoat carrying that Mercury.
And who's going to pay for it? Got a feeling it'll be the country who dumped it, please not us...
 
Another one that hopefully the 'salvors' won't get too.

'In January 2019, wreckage from the USS Wasp was discovered at the bottom of the Coral Sea off the coast of Australia. Surrounded by downed planes and abandoned helmets, the destroyed ship, whose exact location is under wraps, has been preserved for decades in the sea’s warm waters. It was discovered by the expedition crew aboard the Petrel, a research vessel operated by late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s exploration team.'

https://www.history.com/news/wwii-shipwreck-uss-wasp-discovery
 

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