Nautical Archaeology Thread

More finds due to beach erosion in Australia.

https___prod_static9_net.jpg


'The largest section of Inverloch's historic shipwreck has been revealed, with more than 30 centimetres of sand eroding away to uncover more of the wreckage.

'On December 12, 1863, the Amazon departed Melbourne for Mauritius with a cargo of salted meats. Only four days later it washed up on Inverloch surf beach, after encountering a storm on Bass Strait. Since then, the 157-year-old shipwreck has slowly been uncovered due to erosion. "There has been a lot of locals walking on the beach trying to keep themselves fit and healthy, and everyone is just amazed with what they are seeing," secretary of Amazon 1863 Project Inc, Karyn Bugeja said. "At the moment there is more uncovered and it is telling a completely different story to what we thought up until 48 hours ago." We always thought we were looking at the keel of the ship but Heritage Victoria have confirmed it is the stem of the ship which is the bow at the front, which is where the figure head would have been placed," Ms Bugeja said.

'The Amazon 1863 Project Inc. was formed in November, with a group of budding maritime archaeologists working with Heritage Victoria to collect and conserve items that have been detached from the wreckage.'


 
Not a wreck find as such, but nonetheless an interesting link to nautical history.

drone-image-of-beagle-site-with-line.jpg

Multispectral UAV survey involved flying a UAV (drone) fitted with a specialist camera, which captures red, green, infrared, near-infrared light, to create a Neutral Density Vegetation Index (NDVI). This has created a clear outline within the dataset of the original mud dock where HMS Beagle was most likely dismantled, confirming its location. © Wessex Archaeology

'The remains of a rare 19th century dock, built to accommodate HMS Beagle when it was serving as a Coastguard Watch Vessel in Essex, is now protected as a nationally important site. The submerged mud berth on the River Roach near Paglesham has been designated as a scheduled monument by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England.'


 
She should have been easy to find; it's a wonder she didn't glow in the dark.

nevada.jpg


'The sunken hulk of the USS Nevada has been found off the coast of Hawaii, where the battleship — dubbed “unsinkable” for its endurance through World War II — lay since 1948.

'Two private firms working together, Search Inc. and Ocean Infinity, discovered the Nevada almost three miles underwater and about 65 nautical miles southwest of Honolulu, the firms said in a statement Monday. Search Inc., a cultural resource management firm, specializes in archaeology; Ocean Infinity surveys the seabed with marine robotics, according to their websites.

'The Nevada’s lifespan was exceptional, given the troubled waters in which it sailed. It stayed afloat through two world wars and two nuclear-bomb tests. With the end of World War II, the Navy deemed the three-decade old battleship too ancient for the fleet. Its final job was to serve as a target during two atomic bomb tests at Bikini in the Marshall Islands in 1946 – though even that dirty work left the ship only badly damaged and radioactive, not sunk.

'The ship was decommissioned in August 1946, and two years later it was towed to sea off the Hawaiian islands and used for target practice for other Navy ships. Even that four-day pummeling didn’t sink the battle-scarred ship. It was finally scuttled by an aerial torpedo. Although the Navy was aware of the vicinity of the ship’s sinking, its exact resting spot was unknown until now.'



And video of the search here:

 
From the articles above; I wonder what else they might turn up in the coming weeks?

'The search for the USS Nevada was conducted aboard Ocean Infinity’s Pacific Constructor vessel, which had set sail for a range of tasks in early 2020, well before the coronavirus had morphed into a pandemic. “As a result of the global health crisis, the ship has remained at sea on a range of taskings,” Ocean Infinity said in the statement.

'Ocean Infinity used a fleet of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), which can operate in depths greater than 19,600 feet.'
 
Last edited:
Land archaeology, but nautical history.

960x0.jpg


'The Norwegian government has confirmed it will provide substantial funding to begin an excavation of the Gjellestad Viking ship. It will be the first full excavation of a Viking ship in Norway for more than 100 years.

'Despite high recent government expenditure because of the coronavirus crisis, the government has included the expected excavation bill of 15.6 million Norwegian kroner ($1.5 million) in its revised budget. While the Gjellestad ship has been buried for more than 1,000 years, time is of the essence. Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment, Sveinung Rotevatn, said that getting the ship out of the ground is urgent.'


 
Would I trust the Cypriot Government (of either flavour) to do the right thing; not so much. This could end badly.


'British archaeologists who discovered hundreds of artefacts from a cluster of 17th century shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea have been accused of an 'illicit excavation'.

'Enigma Recoveries, which led an expedition into the Levantine Basin off the coast of Cyprus, found 12 shipwrecks filled with Chinese porcelain, jugs, coffee pots, peppercorns and illicit tobacco pipes. The ships and their priceless cargo, hailed as the 'archaeological equivalent of finding a new planet' were recovered in ancient 'shipping lanes' that served spice and silk trades from 300 BC onwards.

'But in a strongly-worded statement, the Cypriot government accused the company of being well known to both Cyprus and UNESCO for its 'illicit underwater excavations' and its 'violent extraction of objects causing destruction to their context'. Cyprus's Department of Antiquities accused the company of intending to sell the objects, as allegedly evident in documents filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (NASDAQ). However, Enigma Recoveries says it hopes the recovered material – which is currently being held in Cyprus – is made publicly viewable in a major museum and says Cyprus Customs wants to retain the finds and sell them in a public auction. The Department of Antiquities denies this and says it is monitoring the collection of 588 artefacts in total and 'their state of preservation'. '


 
Last edited:
Some different news coming out of China.

15631486685381292039.jpg


'Staff work at the excavation site of the shipwreck of Nanhai No. 1 in Yangjiang, south China's Guangdong Province, May 12, 2020. The excavation of the Nanhai No. 1, a shipwreck dating back to the Song Dynasty (960 A.D.-1279 A.D.), has entered the final stage and is expected to conclude in 2021, according to the excavation team. The excavation the ancient shipwreck was listed by China in its top 10 archaeological discoveries for 2019.' (Xinhua/Deng Hua)

 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Would I trust the Cypriot Government (of either flavour) to do the right thing; not so much. This could end badly.


'British archaeologists who discovered hundreds of artefacts from a cluster of 17th century shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea have been accused of an 'illicit excavation'.

'Enigma Recoveries, which led an expedition into the Levantine Basin off the coast of Cyprus, found 12 shipwrecks filled with Chinese porcelain, jugs, coffee pots, peppercorns and illicit tobacco pipes. The ships and their priceless cargo, hailed as the 'archaeological equivalent of finding a new planet' were recovered in ancient 'shipping lanes' that served spice and silk trades from 300 BC onwards.

'But in a strongly-worded statement, the Cypriot government accused the company of being well known to both Cyprus and UNESCO for its 'illicit underwater excavations' and its 'violent extraction of objects causing destruction to their context'. Cyprus's Department of Antiquities accused the company of intending to sell the objects, as allegedly evident in documents filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (NASDAQ). However, Enigma Recoveries says it hopes the recovered material – which is currently being held in Cyprus – is made publicly viewable in a major museum and says Cyprus Customs wants to retain the finds and sell them in a public auction. The Department of Antiquities denies this and says it is monitoring the collection of 588 artefacts in total and 'their state of preservation'. '


Sean Kingsley is known amongst Maritime Archaeologists as a treasure hunter, Enigma Recoveries is essentially Odessey Marine rebranded


They are all about exploiting finds for their own gain.

Treasure Hunters not archaeologists
 
Sean Kingsley is known amongst Maritime Archaeologists as a treasure hunter, Enigma Recoveries is essentially Odessey Marine rebranded


They are all about exploiting finds for their own gain.

Treasure Hunters not archaeologists
It doesn't appear that anyone involved covered themselves in glory.

'Given the Conservative Party’s public stance on Tax Avoidance during the UK General Election, the revelation will cause acute embarrassment to the Conservative Secretary of State for Defence Michael Fallon, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt, and Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin who have all been associated with awarding or overseeing Odyssey’s Government contracts and permissions. However, most embarrassed of all will be Mr Fallon’s close political associate and advisor on education to David Cameron and other senior Conservatives, Sir Robert Balchin, Lord Lingfield. Lord Lingfield is Chair of the charity, the Maritime Heritage Foundation, which employs Odyssey for the controversial salvage of HMS Victory, lost in the English Channel in 1744.

<snip>

'The salvage contract was awarded without a competitive tender process, but apparently with the advice of the consultant to the Maritime Heritage Foundation, Dr Sean Kingsley of Wreck Watch International, who was named in a Parliamentary written answer by culture Minister Ed Vaizey, as being a consultant to both the Maritime Heritage Foundation and to Odyssey Marine Exploration. Dr Kingsley also appears in these roles in several TV documentaries recording Odyssey’s work. While there is no evidence the award of the contract was in any way illegal, in not putting the multi million pound contract out to tender the MHF certainly did not follow commercial and charitable best practice and the appearance that Dr Kingsley had a conflict of interest in appearing to work on both sides of the contract is inescapable.'
 
Hopefully an artifact recovered will lead to identification of the vessel.

28950004-8367435-Archaeologists_have_dated_the_wooden_remains_to_the_18th_or_19th-a-75_1590706...jpg


'A fisherman discovered a coral-coated shipwreck off the coast of Mexico that has laid hidden beneath the surface for over 200 years.

'The wreck is named after Manuel Polanco, the man who discovered it, and sits in a watery grave just 21 miles from Majahual on Mexico's Caribbean coast. Archaeologists dated the wooden remains to the 18th or 19th century and although it is degraded, metal parts, iron ingots, the anchor and an eight-foot cannon are still intact. The team believes the vessel sank after hitting the Chinchorro Bank, which was known for centuries as ' Nightmare reef ' or 'Sleep-robbing reef' due to the dangers it posed to sailors.

'Although some of the vestiges seem to indicate a British affiliation, the INAH researcher clarifies that this hypothesis must be yet corroborated or discarded, through analyses that will be meticulously done, taking care of the natural environment of the site,' Márquez explained.'


 
Lord Lingfield is Chair of the charity, the Maritime Heritage Foundation, which employs Odyssey for the controversial salvage of HMS Victory, lost in the English Channel in 1744.
Odyssey used to have a TV show on Quest channel, I knew that they’d found the original Victory. They even salvaged a couple of main guns to help identify the vessel. But weren’t allowed to do anything else at the time, as they’d found human remains in the wreck. We’re they given permission to do further salvage on her, as she was reputed to have had a lot of Portuguese Gold on board when she foundered?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Ok, if you're telling me that's a boat, I guess that's a boat.

2020-06-08_new_59434884_I1.jpg


'A schoolboy who was fed-up doing his homework went for a paddle in a lake and stumbled across a logboat that could have been buried in the mud for 4,000 years.

'Cathal McDonagh (12), from Lisacul, Co Roscommon, made the discovery while wading in the water at the back of his house. Archaeologists have told his family that the hollowed out log used as a primitive canoe could date from 2,000 BC. A team of experts will travel from Dublin this week to examine the find.

'What adds an extra layer of intrigue to the discovery is that while a river may have flowed through the area thousands of years ago, the lake is inland, small and home to at least one crannog, built to provide refuge from attackers.'


 
Ok, if you're telling me that's a boat, I guess that's a boat.

View attachment 480368

'A schoolboy who was fed-up doing his homework went for a paddle in a lake and stumbled across a logboat that could have been buried in the mud for 4,000 years.

'Cathal McDonagh (12), from Lisacul, Co Roscommon, made the discovery while wading in the water at the back of his house. Archaeologists have told his family that the hollowed out log used as a primitive canoe could date from 2,000 BC. A team of experts will travel from Dublin this week to examine the find.

'What adds an extra layer of intrigue to the discovery is that while a river may have flowed through the area thousands of years ago, the lake is inland, small and home to at least one crannog, built to provide refuge from attackers.'


There is a similar one outside the Loughs Agency HQ opposite the Everglades Hotel. Saw it when I took CLC Jr in to see their aqaurium thing when I needed to kill a little time a few years ago.
 
I wonder whether Erdogan will claim this one as a mosque too?

resize.jpg


'One of the few benefits of lockdown has been the impact it has had on the environment, with people enjoying cleaner air and water in many parts of the world.

'The latest example is in Turkey, where the remains of a submerged 1,600-year-old basilica have returned to view. Incredible photographs show the crystal clear waters of Lake Iznik in the north-western region of the country, with the Byzantine-era basilica just a couple of metres below. The ruins, which are usually slightly shrouded in algae, were first discovered in 2014 and are an architectural example of early Christianity.'


 

Latest Threads

Top