Nautical Archaeology Thread

Nearly 100 years on, and with no particular archaeological value, though obvious fame/celebrity/popular culture interest, I tend to agree with those who categorise this venture as commercial rather than historical.

'A wireless telegraph machine, sometimes called the "voice of the Titanic" for its role in sending out distress messages on the fateful night in 1912 when the RMS Titanic cruise liner hit an iceberg, could be recovered from the shipwreck lying at the bottom of the North Atlantic.

'But not everyone is on board with this plan: One of the scientists behind the recovery plan says he is shocked by the "outpouring of contempt" that the proposal has generated among critics.

'Oceanographer David Gallo, formerly of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Massachusetts and now a consultant for the court-approved salvager of the shipwreck, RMS Titanic Inc., said the proposal was an attempt to save the iconic artifact before it was lost forever.'


 
There are no excuses for a casual visit to Saaffend, but this may provide a reason to go.

Swashbuckling shipmates can join in on an interactive event to learn more about the historic shipwreck of The London, which lays just off the Southend coast. Archaeologists and historians have been studying the 1665 wreck, which lays at the mouth of the estuary, and will be giving talks about their findings as part of the free event, which will take place on Saturday (March 7).

Guests will be able to learn how to load a cannon, see other firearms and instruments on display, and be wowed by members of the English Civil War Society, who will be in 17th century costume. Councillor Kevin Robinson, cabinet member for business, culture and tourism, said: “It is going to be a great days for families, as some of the display will be interactive and educational. “It should also be of interest to anyone with a passion for England’s nautical history, plus anyone with a long standing family connection to Southend. Samuel Pepys wrote about the explosion and sinking of The London and it remains an important part of the town’s heritage. This is a chance to hear more, directly from the experts who are studying the wreckage and see some of the items the ship holds.”

The event will take place at The Forum in Elmer Square, Southend, between 1am and 5pm. Although tickets are free, there is limited availability. Please visit StackPath to avoid disappointment.

People who do not have tickets can still drop by to see the cannon and some of the other items on display. The event has been arranged in partnership with The Nautical Archaeology Society, The London Shipwreck Trust, with the support of Historic England, Southend Museums and Southend-on-Sea Borough Council. Campaign Save the London has been set up to fund the reclamation and preservation of the wreck and the items on board, which are being washed away and destroyed with every tide and passing vessel.

 
A discussion this morning resulted in talking of the Mary Rose. We could not remember the name of the guy who designed the lifting cradle? We know Babcock were involved,but the name of the actual designer eluded us.
Google didn’t help.Anyone know the name?
Ta in advance.
 
A discussion this morning resulted in talking of the Mary Rose. We could not remember the name of the guy who designed the lifting cradle? We know Babcock were involved,but the name of the actual designer eluded us.
Google didn’t help.Anyone know the name?
Ta in advance.
Looks like John Grace, an associate partner with R.J. Crocker & Partners.
 
A discussion this morning resulted in talking of the Mary Rose. We could not remember the name of the guy who designed the lifting cradle? We know Babcock were involved,but the name of the actual designer eluded us.
Google didn’t help.Anyone know the name?
Ta in advance.
Looks like John Grace, an associate partner with R.J. Crocker & Partners.
I've just checked Peter Marsden's book Sealed by Time: The Loss and Recovery of the Mary Rose and the Underwater Lifting Frame (ULF) and its cradle were designed by John Grace and manufactured by Babcock Construction Ltd. at their Wolverhampton, Gravesend and Retford factories.
 
More driving problems for the US Pacific Fleet, though this one some time ago.

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'A team of explorers have found the wreck of a United States Navy submarine that sank more than 60 years ago in deep water near the Hawaiian island of Oahu.

'USS Stickleback, a Balao-class submarine with the hull number SS-415, sank on May 28, 1958, after an accidental collision with another U.S. Navy ship, the USS Silverstein. Both the Stickleback and the Silverstein were taking part in an antisubmarine warfare exercise at the time.

'The Stickleback is the sixth submarine wreck found by the Lost 52 Project, a private group based in New York that hopes to find all 52 of the missing U.S. submarines that sank during World War II, and all four U.S. submarines that sank during the Cold War.'
 
Exploration of an early Australian-built wreck.

'According to a statement from Flinders University, an international team of researchers investigated the wreck of the Barbara, which sank near the coast of southeastern Australia in 1853. The Barbara was constructed in Tasmania in 1841 to carry lime for brickmaking, which was an early industry practiced in southern Australia. Analysis of wood samples revealed the ship was built from timbers grown in Victoria, New South Wales, Northern Australia, Western Australia, and Tasmanian blue gum, a type of eucalyptus tree. “This is possibly the first time such a wide variety of timbers have been found in an Australian built vessel,” said Wendy Van Duivenvoorde of Flinders University. “It indicates that early shipbuilders had developed a detailed knowledge of the properties of indigenous timbers appropriate for shipbuilding.” Analysis of metal and fiber samples taken from the wreck is still underway, she added.'

 
And one from Maine.

Maine Ship 2018
(Gerry Runte)

'Researcher Stefan Claesson has determined that the remains of a ship that periodically appear in the shifting sands of southern Maine date to the mid-eighteenth century, according to a Seacoast Online report. The hull currently measures about 50 feet long, but Claesson thinks the narrow vessel was about 60 feet long when it was built. “I believe it is the sloop Defiance,” Claesson said. “I think the ship is a pink, a type of cargo ship.” Claesson said he mapped the site with a drone and geographic information system technology. Wood samples analyzed by the Cornell University Tree-Ring Laboratory were found to be from trees cut down in 1753. Using that information as a starting point, Claesson then examined notary records kept by Daniel Moulton between 1750 and 1794, and found that the Defiance ran aground in Cape Neddick Cove in 1769.

“Defiance fit every description,” he explained. Additional research revealed that on its last journey, the Defiance left Salem, Massachusetts, and was headed for Portland, Maine’s Casco Bay, carrying a crew of four, flour, pork, and other supplies when it hit rocks in Cape Neddick Cove during a storm. The crew survived, but the ship was lost. Claesson has also recommended procedures to protect the wreckage from further damage. Photographs taken of the ship in the 1950s and the 1970s show that its mast has since been cut off.'


More photos here - York shipwreck predated American Revolution, say researchers
 
Not marine archaeology as such, but certainly one of interest to the divers.

'Although exact numbers are notoriously hard to verify, it is estimated that there are at least 2,000 shipwrecks in Greek waters. Of these, more than 1,000 ships were sunk during the ravages of WWII. It is thought that as many as 12 per cent – that is 120 ships and an unknown number of their crews – were lost in the wider Pagasitikos Gulf, northern Euboean and Pelion area on the central eastern coast of mainland Greece. Aerial strafing and bombing, submarine torpedo salvos, naval gun action, shipping mines, even deliberate scuttling are all causes of their demise. The underlying reason for such a significant concentration is that the passage between the eastern Greek coast and elongated island of Euboea has always served as major shipping route from Athens (i.e. Piraeus) to Thessaloniki. It is also the more sheltered route many mariners take on their way north through the Aegean to the Bosphorus and the Black Sea and vice versa.

The importance of the area in modern maritime history has not been lost on Dr Kimon Papadimitriou of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and fellow members of the Underwater Survey Team (UST). Their efforts, which include academic papers and presentations on the lecture circuit, are directed towards the promotion of thematic underwater tours of 20th century shipwrecks, particularly those from WWII. It is no small task, given that many sites remain undocumented or unverified, while others are inaccessible to divers by law because they are in declared archeological no-go areas.

'Fortunately, times are changing. As part of the European Union’s BlueMed programme, the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities division of the Greek Ministry of Culture has began an initiative to promote marine tourism by making specific underwater heritage sites open to the public. As already reported in Neos Kosmos in July 2019, they are currently conducting a series of trials for recreational SCUBA divers to gain first-hand experience of cultural assets such as the 2,400 year old Peristera shipwreck near the island of Alonisos, in addition to establishing virtual reality museums and information centres for the non-diving public. Although the proposal focuses on ships, settlements and harbour installations from antiquity, the wrecks of ships and aircraft which are over fifty years old are also considered to be monuments. As such, they provide additional value as tourist destinations.

'The change is in line with the UNESCO conservation agreement of Underwater Cultural Heritage, as drawn up by the United Nations and signed by member states in 2001. Its mandate includes the in situ preservation and non-commercialisation of submerged locations and artifacts of cultural interest. Importantly, it also advocates the sharing of relevant education about such sites.'


Full Article - The Importance of WWII Shipwrecks in Greece | Neos Kosmos
 
It appears that a number of Roman and pre Roman ships have been discovered in a coal mine in Serbia at the old base of the Danube River Fleet at Viminacium.
Not much media interest in the English press yet.
Twitter #viminacium
 
It appears that a number of Roman and pre Roman ships have been discovered in a coal mine in Serbia at the old base of the Danube River Fleet at Viminacium.
Not much media interest in the English press yet.
Twitter #viminacium
A little here.

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Near the Viminacium archaeological site, where the Mlava River once flowed into the Danube, a ship between 15 and 16 meters long was discovered, probably from the ancient period. “This discovery, without any exaggeration, is sensational, unique and unbelievable… The ship type has the elements that have not changed significantly over the millennia, so the discovered object cannot be dated in this manner,” said Miomir Korac, PhD, who is conducting research at Viminacium. Namely, the Roman fleet Classis Flaviae was stationed at Viminacium. The analyses will show whether this is a Roman, Byzantine or medieval ship, or a ship from a much earlier prehistoric period, but it is clear that this discovery will occupy a special place in the already remarkable offer of the Viminacium Archaeological Park, as a unique discovery in our region, he believes.

 

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