Nautical Archaeology Thread

Enormous Polish punts!

'A 37-metre-long shipwreck has been discovered by archaeologists in the Vistula river near Warsaw. The archaeological team believe that the vessel, which is six metres wide and could date back as far as the 14th century, was a cargo ship or punt used to transport up to 100 tons of goods in the times when Poland was Western Europe’s main grain supplier.'

exploring 13 kilometres of the river.

Sometimes size does matter! A picture of the wreck and the dingy the archaeologists used to search for it.Podwodne wraki Warszawy/Facebook

 
A bit more detail on the bridge mentioned in the article above.

'In addition to the 120-foot-long cargo vessel, the underwater archaeologists also uncovered debris from a destroyed World War II bridge in a stretch of the river near the village of Łomianki Dolne, around 11 miles north of Warsaw. "Our analyses and historical information show that the bridge was built by German sappers," Brzóska said. Sappers are combat engineers which are used by militaries to construct and repair infrastructure, such as bridges and fortifications. Among the debris, the team found a steel structure, as well as the pile structures used to support the bridge.

'The researchers identified the sunken vessel and the bridge using sonar technology fitted onto a motorboat, which they used to a survey an 8-mile-long stretch of the river.'


 
A 'Bermuda Triangle' secret revealed.

'A team of experts has located the wreck of a merchant ship that vanished in the Bermuda Triangle in 1925.

'The fate of the SS Cotopaxi has long been shrouded in mystery. On Nov. 29, 1925, the steam-powered vessel left Charleston, S.C. for Havana, Cuba. She never reached her destination and the bodies of the Cotopaxi’s 32 passengers were never recovered.

'Now, however, a group of underwater explorers and maritime archaeologists have located the ill-fated ship about 35 nautical miles off the coast of St. Augustine, Fla. In a statement, the Science Channel explained that marine biologist and underwater explorer Michael Barnette contacted British historian Guy Walters to help find the mysterious ship.

“Walters combed through ship records at the archives of Lloyd’s of London, who were the insurance brokers for the SS Cotopaxi,” the Science Channel explained. “There he discovered something previously unknown about the SS Cotopaxi’s voyage. The ship had sent out wireless distress signals with a position on December 1st, 1925, two days after it left Charleston.”


 

rampant

LE
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Hardly the 'Flying Dutchman'.

A ghost ship which was spotted off the coast of Africa six months ago has washed up on the Irish shore following Storm Dennis. The 77-metre MV Alta cargo ship, which is sailing under a Tanzanian flag, was spotted in Ballycotton, County Cork on Sunday morning.



 
More great work being done by the US to better document the missing.

'Three U.S. World War II aircraft have been discovered in a lagoon in Micronesia 76 years after they went missing. The planes, which were part of Operation Hailstone in February 1944, are associated with 7 U.S. servicemen listed as missing in action.

'Project Recover, which harnesses technology in an attempt to find and repatriate Americans missing in action (MIA) during World War II, discovered the aircraft in Truk Lagoon, now known as Chuuk Lagoon, part of the Federated States of Micronesia. The two SBD-5 Dauntless dive bombers and the TBM/F-1 Avenger torpedo bomber took part in Operation Hailstone against Japanese forces in the lagoon on Feb. 17 and Feb. 18, 1944.

'Project Recover CEO and retired U.S. Marine aviator Derek Abbey said that, including Operation Hailstone, a total of 28 U.S. aircraft from World War II, associated with 103 MIAs, are believed to be missing in Truk Lagoon. “Project Recover is honored to play our part in keeping our nation's promise of returning our fallen service members home and we remain committed to locating more Americans missing in action in Chuuk and around the world," he said, in a statement.'


Tail section from an SBD-5 Dauntless dive bomber from Operation Hailstone resting on the floor of Truk Lagoon.


 
Must have been one hell of a party.

Around 200 Ancient Roman amphora have been discovered in an underwater cave off of the coast of Majorca — in the first dive down there in 20 years

'Around 200 Ancient Roman amphora have been discovered in an underwater cave off of the coast of Majorca — in the first dive down there in 20 years The artefacts were found in the Fuente de Ses Aiguades cave, which lies in the Bay of Alcudia on the northeastern coast of Majorca, in the Spanish Balearic Islands.'

Around-200-ancient-Roman-amphora-used-store-wine-discovered-underwater-cave
 

4(T)

LE
Must have been one hell of a party.

Around 200 Ancient Roman amphora have been discovered in an underwater cave off of the coast of Majorca — in the first dive down there in 20 years

'Around 200 Ancient Roman amphora have been discovered in an underwater cave off of the coast of Majorca — in the first dive down there in 20 years The artefacts were found in the Fuente de Ses Aiguades cave, which lies in the Bay of Alcudia on the northeastern coast of Majorca, in the Spanish Balearic Islands.'

Around-200-ancient-Roman-amphora-used-store-wine-discovered-underwater-cave

So many questions;


How deep was the cave under water?
Was it under water during Roman times, or have sea levels changed that much?
If it was under water in Roman times, how/why did amphora end up there?
Did the Romans do cave diving (I wouldn't be surprised)?
 
So many questions;


How deep was the cave under water?
Was it under water during Roman times, or have sea levels changed that much?
If it was under water in Roman times, how/why did amphora end up there?
Did the Romans do cave diving (I wouldn't be surprised)?
Well, it was the DM after all; hardly known for journalistic rigour (or accuracy)!
 
Would love to go and see the USS Cairo one day. Probably the finest example of an American Civil War ironclad still around today.

 
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A 'Bermuda Triangle' secret revealed.

'A team of experts has located the wreck of a merchant ship that vanished in the Bermuda Triangle in 1925.

'The fate of the SS Cotopaxi has long been shrouded in mystery. On Nov. 29, 1925, the steam-powered vessel left Charleston, S.C. for Havana, Cuba. She never reached her destination and the bodies of the Cotopaxi’s 32 passengers were never recovered.

'Now, however, a group of underwater explorers and maritime archaeologists have located the ill-fated ship about 35 nautical miles off the coast of St. Augustine, Fla. In a statement, the Science Channel explained that marine biologist and underwater explorer Michael Barnette contacted British historian Guy Walters to help find the mysterious ship.

“Walters combed through ship records at the archives of Lloyd’s of London, who were the insurance brokers for the SS Cotopaxi,” the Science Channel explained. “There he discovered something previously unknown about the SS Cotopaxi’s voyage. The ship had sent out wireless distress signals with a position on December 1st, 1925, two days after it left Charleston.”


So it wasn't aliens?

cotopaxi-close-encounters-of-the-third-kind.jpg
 
Update, with hopefully more to follow.

'There was a bit of sealing wax with a fingerprint, a brush entangled with strands of hair, and a set of lieutenants’ epaulets. These were among about 350 artifacts that were recently plucked from the sunken crevices and cabins of the H.M.S. Erebus, one of two naval ships that vanished after setting out from England more than 170 years ago in search of a Northwest passage across the Canadian Arctic.

'The disappearance of the Erebus and the H.M.S. Terror is still a mystery, part of a story that has eluded scientists, rescuers and historians for more than a century. On Thursday, Parks Canada, Canada’s national parks service, and representatives from the Inuit population said they hoped the newly recovered artifacts from the Erebus would help them reconstruct what happened aboard the vessels before they sank.

“This is only the beginning of the excavation,” Ryan Harris, the senior underwater archaeologist and Parks Canada’s project director, said in an interview. “We are trying to learn the sequence of events, basically the historical narrative.”


So glad to you post this information, I’m finding it totally fascinating the recovery of artefacts from the Terror and the Erebus. Wouldn’t it be fabulous if they were to recover one or even both of the vessels.
 
So glad to you post this information, I’m finding it totally fascinating the recovery of artefacts from the Terror and the Erebus. Wouldn’t it be fabulous if they were to recover one or even both of the vessels.
There are no plans at this time to try to recover the wrecks themselves. The remoteness of their location and the climatic and weather difficulties preclude it with current levels of technology. They're happy to just be able to get enough suitable weather to be able to dive on the wrecks for a few weeks each year.
 
There are no plans at this time to try to recover the wrecks themselves. The remoteness of their location and the climatic and weather difficulties preclude it with current levels of technology. They're happy to just be able to get enough suitable weather to be able to dive on the wrecks for a few weeks each year.
Must admit that was wishful thinking, those two ships and the ones they’ve found at the bottom of the Black Sea I find totally fascinating.
 
Discovery pre-dates the thread, but came up in another article I was reading. The apparent state of preservation is amazing.


Diagram, top, and sonar image, below, of the German submarine U-576. Photo: NOAA.

'A sonar image of the German U-boat U-576, which was sent to the bottom of the Atlantic by U.S. Naval forces after attacking a guarded merchant convoy on July 15, 1942.'

 
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Ongoing conservation work on the USS Monitor.

Monitor Gun Conservation

(Brock Switzer/The Mariners' Museum and Park)

'The Daily Press reports that conservators at the Mariners’ Museum bored the barrel of one of the Dahlgren guns from the ironclad warship USS Monitor, which was launched by the Union Navy in 1862 and lost later that year in a storm off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The ship’s turret and its two Dahlgren guns, which measure 11 feet long and weigh nearly eight tons each, were recovered in 2002 and have been sitting in preservative solution. “We take years to prepare for [a few hours] of operation,” explained Will Hoffman, the museum’s director of conservation. Silt, coal, marine concretions, and other debris from the sea floor were slowly removed from the gun with a hollow drill bit that was custom-made to be slightly smaller than the gun’s 11-inch diameter. Conservators said that clearing the inside of the gun will allow them to extract salt from the gun’s interior.'

 
New finds in Istria, Croatia. The language is a bit stilted, but you'll get the drift.

'(A)n interesting new archaeological site was discovered during the reconstruction of the City of Porec's picturesque waterfront.

'Archaeologists are now monitoring the entire area in which the works are being carried out, and after discovering a remarkable Venetian waterfront and the remains of an ancient port, a new site was found at a depth of four metres below what is today's walking level, more specifically two metres below sea level near a round tower.

'According to Klaudija Bartolic Sirotic, an archaeologist at the National Museum of the City of Porec, one square structure was found with different reinforcements belonging to it. The assumption is that this is a fortification system of the City of Porec since it is located near a round tower that was built way back in 1474. Further and more in depth research will seek to clarify how this system of medieval fortification spread.

'It is interesting to note that in the lower part of the site, free blocks believed to be from Roman times were discovered, which were used secondarily to strengthen the structure of the existing tower, while at the very bottom, a block believed to be of Roman production was also discovered. In addition, numerous other finds, such as alfalfa and amphorae, were found in various forms which were typical of the Age of Antiquity.

'So far, no residue of organic material have been observed at the site, so further analysis of the detected samples will provide more detailed data. Based on just a few blocks, Bartolic Sirotic points out, it is difficult to determine the exact time of construction, but the deposited material here points to the 1st century. If it is a Roman structure that was upgraded during the Middle Ages, more will be known after the eastern face of the wall is opened.

'Upon completion of the survey, the site, in agreement with the conservationists and the City of Porec, will be archaeologically protected and adequately presented to the public.'



'In addition, the remains of old Roman vessel were discovered recently in front of the Danelon Palace, popularly called the Kompas building. Archaeologists assume that it is a smaller vessel crafted in a technique characteristic of the northeastern Adriatic, that is, the area of historical Histria and Liburnia. The find has been provisionally protected, and the level of conservation, its dimensions and other details will be published after an archaeological survey has been completed, in one month's time at the earliest.'

 

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