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National Trust under scrutiny

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Auld-Yin

ADC
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Didn't your lot win their first battle honour (actually THE first battle honour) in Africa?
Indeed, although the fight to get it as a BH was much tougher than the siege! ;)
 
The chairman of the National Trust has defended Black Lives Matter (BLM), which has campaigned to abolish the police and capitalism, describing it as "a human rights movement with no party political affiliations". ...A human rights movement with no party political affiliations...

Rod Liddle wrote: "They do not think they are opinions at all, simply that they are right. And there is uniformity of opinion among the largely young, largely arts or social science graduates, largely metropolitan, exclusively middle-class liberals who work for the organisation."

He was writing about the BBC, but the criticism touches on those whom a slightly confused Member of Parliament described as a" bourgeois elite".

I commend the full article to you:

 

Truxx

LE
Very interesting thread.

I am a trustee and sit on the board of a national charity. Normally I sit quietly in the corner whe the professional committee typeswaffle on about not very much.

But more recently I have found myself pitching into the debate a little more, as some of the themes discussed here are beginning to gain traction. My position is that the organisation exists for its membership, not to big up the egos of select few.

If you really want to draw keys and work ticket for the outrage bus then a google of charity CEO salaries is worth doing:

 
Very interesting thread.

I am a trustee and sit on the board of a national charity. Normally I sit quietly in the corner whe the professional committee typeswaffle on about not very much.

But more recently I have found myself pitching into the debate a little more, as some of the themes discussed here are beginning to gain traction. My position is that the organisation exists for its membership, not to big up the egos of select few.

If you really want to draw keys and work ticket for the outrage bus then a google of charity CEO salaries is worth doing:


Interesting how "out of date" the figures are - National Trust 2012!

Wifey works for a small but international charity running all the support services. She's on OK money but not equivalent to commercial sector and she has turned don pay rises to use the money to bring her team up in pay. In her time there she has curtailed a lot of superfluous travel and expenses (domestic and foreign) by employees and rationalised services to manage costs down. Previous CEO had a company Audi usually driven by his wife. New CEO travels second class on the train. Wifey's team really do put in extra, especially now they are mostly working at home because they believe in what they are doing so work into the evening.

She knows exactly how much donated money goes in runnin the charity and a lot of the running cost is funded by rent from property donated or acquired in the early years of the charity so almost self funding.

Get her started on the funds retained and lack of transparency of big charities like Oxfam, RSPCA, RNLI, RBL and she goes full on agnry mode. They have huge funds, senior staff are very well paid and they give out funds to "pet projects" rather than individual causes. We give to local charities where we can see the transparency and where the money goes like the village hall run by volunteers etc.
 

Truxx

LE
Interesting how "out of date" the figures are - National Trust 2012!

Wifey works for a small but international charity running all the support services. She's on OK money but not equivalent to commercial sector and she has turned don pay rises to use the money to bring her team up in pay. In her time there she has curtailed a lot of superfluous travel and expenses (domestic and foreign) by employees and rationalised services to manage costs down. Previous CEO had a company Audi usually driven by his wife. New CEO travels second class on the train. Wifey's team really do put in extra, especially now they are mostly working at home because they believe in what they are doing so work into the evening.

She knows exactly how much donated money goes in runnin the charity and a lot of the running cost is funded by rent from property donated or acquired in the early years of the charity so almost self funding.

Get her started on the funds retained and lack of transparency of big charities like Oxfam, RSPCA, RNLI, RBL and she goes full on agnry mode. They have huge funds, senior staff are very well paid and they give out funds to "pet projects" rather than individual causes. We give to local charities where we can see the transparency and where the money goes like the village hall run by volunteers etc.
There is another stat worth googling relating to how much donated money is actually spent delivering good. In some cases it's a surprisingly low percentage. I seem to recall one of the better performers being the Salvation Army.

Just in case anyone thinks otherwise no- one in the charity I represent draws a penny. We do pay certain travel expenses though.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Interesting how "out of date" the figures are - National Trust 2012!

Wifey works for a small but international charity running all the support services. She's on OK money but not equivalent to commercial sector and she has turned don pay rises to use the money to bring her team up in pay. In her time there she has curtailed a lot of superfluous travel and expenses (domestic and foreign) by employees and rationalised services to manage costs down. Previous CEO had a company Audi usually driven by his wife. New CEO travels second class on the train. Wifey's team really do put in extra, especially now they are mostly working at home because they believe in what they are doing so work into the evening.

She knows exactly how much donated money goes in runnin the charity and a lot of the running cost is funded by rent from property donated or acquired in the early years of the charity so almost self funding.

Get her started on the funds retained and lack of transparency of big charities like Oxfam, RSPCA, RNLI, RBL and she goes full on agnry mode. They have huge funds, senior staff are very well paid and they give out funds to "pet projects" rather than individual causes. We give to local charities where we can see the transparency and where the money goes like the village hall run by volunteers etc.
To be honest, I'm okay with an executive of a given calibre getting a commensurate rate.

An example is my brother's former boss, who started his business in his parents' attic and retired a multi-millionaire (with emphasis on the 'multi').

He's precisely the sort of person that government should be bringing in at the top of the civil service - and when people complain that he's on a huge salary, point to the 'millions but he generates billions' reality.

Contrast that with the sell-offs of public utilities a few decades back, when anonymous civil servants were suddenly on huge salaries "because that's the market rate for someone of that seniority" - yes, the market rate for a successful individual with a proven track record.

Not everyone can afford to be altruistic. Were I financially comfortable enough to run a charity free, I probably would. The reality is that I have bills to pay, and I don't see why if I work hard - really hard - my only reward is a tiny flat above a chip shop.

As ever, it's about balance. Reward should match effort and I don't see an issue with that just because it's in a charity environment.

Just don't kick the árse out of it. For instance, I stopped supporting H4H when I saw how much the people at the top had unilaterally decided to pay themselves. Yes, the organisation was making money hand over fist and the people who originated it had a good idea, but...

...

The bit that's gripping me as much at the moment is the politicisation. The seemingly unilateral decisions from the top that organisations have to get Woke. The National Trust has a remit, and the current chief is stretching interpretation of that to the limit... which is a polite way of saying I feel that he's taking the píss. @Truxx nails it in the post you're responding to: it's become too much about egos.
 
Mrs b has just cancelled our family membership of the NT. Like many others who have already cancelled, she's had enough of the politicisation and wokeness.
 

HCL

LE
There is another stat worth googling relating to how much donated money is actually spent delivering good. In some cases it's a surprisingly low percentage. I seem to recall one of the better performers being the Salvation Army.

Just in case anyone thinks otherwise no- one in the charity I represent draws a penny. We do pay certain travel expenses though.

I've always given to the Sally. They were always there for us, with a brew and a sticky. One of life's mysteries was how the tea van used to find us; suppose they could have followed Wolfgang's tail lights except he was usually about 30km away.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
To be honest, I'm okay with an executive of a given calibre getting a commensurate rate.

An example is my brother's former boss, who started his business in his parents' attic and retired a multi-millionaire (with emphasis on the 'multi').

He's precisely the sort of person that government should be bringing in at the top of the civil service - and when people complain that he's on a huge salary, point to the 'millions but he generates billions' reality.

Contrast that with the sell-offs of public utilities a few decades back, when anonymous civil servants were suddenly on huge salaries "because that's the market rate for someone of that seniority" - yes, the market rate for a successful individual with a proven track record.

Not everyone can afford to be altruistic. Were I financially comfortable enough to run a charity free, I probably would. The reality is that I have bills to pay, and I don't see why if I work hard - really hard - my only reward is a tiny flat above a chip shop.

As ever, it's about balance. Reward should match effort and I don't see an issue with that just because it's in a charity environment.

Just don't kick the árse out of it. For instance, I stopped supporting H4H when I saw how much the people at the top had unilaterally decided to pay themselves. Yes, the organisation was making money hand over fist and the people who originated it had a good idea, but...

...

The bit that's gripping me as much at the moment is the politicisation. The seemingly unilateral decisions from the top that organisations have to get Woke. The National Trust has a remit, and the current chief is stretching interpretation of that to the limit... which is a polite way of saying I feel that he's taking the píss. @Truxx nails it in the post you're responding to: it's become too much about egos.
The Charities Commission site is instructive...

Employee salaries over £60,000
Number of employees
£60k to £70k8
£70k to £80k3
£80k to £90k3
£90k to £100k3
£100k to £110k2
£120k to £130k1
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
The Charities Commission site is instructive...

Employee salaries over £60,000
Number of employees
£60k to £70k8
£70k to £80k3
£80k to £90k3
£90k to £100k3
£100k to £110k2
£120k to £130k1
Yes, but I live in the south-east - an area where a combined household salary of £100k is pretty much necessary to be able to afford a modest house and not be constantly living on credit cards.

There's a lot of responsibility involved in running an organisation - and especially one which purports to have a moral standpoint. I don't see £60-70k as 'a lot'.

£120-130 isn't either, as the sole breadwinner in certain parts of the world.

And around and around we go...
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Article in full:

The National Trust’s job is to conserve our history – not vilify its heroes
Wordsworth, Kipling and Churchill are being subjected to 2020’s lens. What gives an elite minority the right to traduce our past?

SIMON HEFFER
24 October 2020 • 9:36am
Simon Heffer

It has seemed for some years as though the National Trust has a death wish, as it dumbs down its properties and uses them more and more for publicity-seeking stunts. The fact that it has compiled a dossier of properties linked to “colonialism and slavery” appears to confirm my fear.

Apparently, the Trust’s “experts” – few of whom, on the basis of what this says about their expertise, would deserve even the lowest class of history degree from the worst imaginable university – say that around a third of its properties are associated with the “sometimes-uncomfortable role that Britain, and Britons, have played in global history”.

Yes, the good old National Trust – once the haven of well-preserved stately homes, woodland walks, and tea, jam and scones – is now determined to become part of that noisy elite minority that can’t let a day go by without engaging in an act of self-flagellation, and reminding us what a shocking country, and people, we supposedly are.


The Trust seems not to understand that its role is to conserve our historic houses, artefacts and landscapes: it is not the administrator of some nationwide re-education programme. The “list of shame” about slavery and colonialism is a typical example of the ignorance of those in charge. First, there seems to be some confusion of the two terms. Most British colonies, and almost all of those in Africa, were established after slavery was abolished. Once definitions of iniquity become so loose, it is easy to shovel the reputations of almost any historical figure you like into them.

So visitors to Bateman’s, Rudyard Kipling’s house in Sussex, will need to brace themselves for a description of the wickedness of the man who gave us the phrase “the White Man’s Burden”. One would never have thought that a man who was the most popular writer of his age, revered by millions in this country and around the world – and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature – would have to be placed at a bargepole’s length from the present generation.

Even less predictably, those visiting one of Wordsworth’s houses in the Lake District – the poet who wrote, of the French Revolution, “Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, / But to be young was very heaven!” – must also vicariously repent. William’s younger brother, John, once worked for the East India Company, an organisation with whom local Indian princes happily and profitably traded.

But, inevitably, the focus of the outrage has been Chartwell, Winston Churchill’s country house in north Kent. Churchill, whose minor achievement of managing our victory in the Second World War seems to count for nothing today, is condemned because while he was trying to stop Hitler’s programme of genocide and near-apocalyptic destruction, he failed to respond adequately to the Bengal famine.

The latter was no laughing matter – it is estimated that between two and three million Indians died in it, either of starvation or of diseases caused by it. A debate has continued ever since about how far the disaster was man-made and how far an act of God; Bengal, now Bangladesh, had been hit by a cyclone, flooding and rice-crop disease. There being a war on, there was a severe shortage of shipping when it came to sending aid. To blame Churchill – whose political record in other respects was patchy, to say the least – is not so much harsh as ridiculous.

Sir Winston is also attacked by the Trust for opposing Indian independence. Well, so did almost every leading British politician from 1858, when the British government took over running India from the East India Company, until the Second World War. God knows what the Trust are going to do about Disraeli, whose Buckinghamshire house, Hughenden Manor, is another of their properties: he was so enthusiastic about British rule in India that he arranged for Queen Victoria to become Empress of it.

The Trust says it wants to present its visitors with “very painful” histories. Why? Since when was it the function of this conservation group to vilify so many of our historical figures, people who – when not engaging in acts of racial, sexual and gender oppression – were helping to forge a democracy that set an example followed around the civilised world?

For too long, the Trust has treated its core clientele – middle-aged and elderly people – with near-contempt. Too many of their properties have been made what they call “accessible” – made into, effectively, children’s play centres, offering a potted version of Leftist history that is either sanitised or propagandistic.

But the real stupidity of the Trust lies not in its allowing a highly questionable view of history to colour its presentation of its properties. It lies in digging its own grave even more deeply at a time when it is having to sack 1,200 of its 14,000 staff because of the Covid-19 crisis, and when partly because of that, but also partly because of its sod-the-public attitude, people have been staying away from its properties in droves. Hilary McGrady, the Trust’s director-general, needs to get a grip, lest her whole enterprise haemorrhage its core membership and head towards insolvency.

This is the worst possible time for the Trust to start behaving in this aggressively irrelevant fashion. It could well provoke thousands of members to resign, and volunteers to go with them, because they will not be indoctrinated in this fashion, or told to loathe their country as some form of penance.

It ought also to provoke an investigation by the Charities Commission about the Trust’s political activities. On the front page of its website, it boasts that it carries out its founders’ wishes “to care for nature, beauty and history”. Well, it shows a pitiful care for history to distort it as the fanatics who are now in control seem determined to do.

“The values of our founders are still at the heart of everything we do,” the official preening continues. Oh really? One thing that can be said with certainty about the founders is that they started the Trust because they loved and wished to preserve Britain’s past – not to use it as the basis for an object lesson in self-hatred.
Whilst I agree with the above, Heffer is, and has always been, a bit ofa cvnt:

Excerpt from his comments on Hillsborough:

The extreme reaction to Mr Bigley's murder is fed by the fact that he was a Liverpudlian. Liverpool is a handsome city with a tribal sense of community. ... An excessive predilection for welfarism have created a peculiar, and deeply unattractive, psyche among many Liverpudlians. They see themselves whenever possible as victims, and resent their victim status; yet at the same time they wallow in it. ... They cannot accept that they might have made any contribution to their misfortunes, but seek rather to blame someone else for it, thereby deepening their sense of shared tribal grievance against the rest of society. The deaths of more than 50 Liverpool football supporters at Hillsborough in 1989 was undeniably a greater tragedy than the single death, however horrible, of Mr Bigley; but that is no excuse for Liverpool's failure to acknowledge, even to this day, the part played in the disaster by drunken fans at the back of the crowd who mindlessly tried to fight their way into the ground that Saturday afternoon. The police became a convenient scapegoat, and The Sun newspaper a whipping-boy for daring, albeit in a tasteless fashion, to hint at the wider causes of the incident.[13]
 
EmX7SJ8XIAAZLlb.jpeg
 
I rejoined in January with the intention of making good use of my membership.
Then covid kicked off, and we have a newborn.
I won’t be rejoining this year this year , I’ll leave it for a couple of years until I can make use of my membership.
 
We were down in Dorset on the coast last week and a lot of the beaches were managed as National Trust sites. The National Trust employees all seem like good eggs - being Dorset it was mostly people in their 50s working in cafes or doing bit of what looked like voluntary work. I'd say we have a massive disconnect by the politically correct brigade who now running NT, the workforce and the people who are members. Hopefully it wont end well for the people now running NT
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
We were down in Dorset on the coast last week and a lot of the beaches were managed as National Trust sites. The National Trust employees all seem like good eggs - being Dorset it was mostly people in their 50s working in cafes or doing bit of what looked like voluntary work. I'd say we have a massive disconnect by the politically correct brigade who now running NT, the workforce and the people who are members. Hopefully it wont end well for the people now running NT
I think your comments echo what's happening in many organisations and institutions.

SWMBO made a comment this morning which was bang on the nose.

Every organisation at the moment seems to be rushing to do at least something. As she said, a token effort for fear of not being seen to be on board.

Token is a very small step from tokenism, and that is a very bad place to be. Like, a 30-50 years ago place to be. It's not progress.

The sad part of this is, for the 'tokens', if I may put it like that, it's also a bad place to be. Take the new presenter of A Question of Sport, for instance. Had it been Alex Scott, many people would only have seen her colour because at the moment we're being battered with colour. She'd have ended up in a position where her credibility was shot before she even started.

That's not progress.

Take the army; the individuals within, including the BAME individuals, just get on with stuff. I can't see that the BAME guys (other gender-something descriptions are available) are chuffed to be constantly shoved to the front in PR photos.

PC for whatever reasons is running riot at the moment and the government's eye** is really off the ball*.




*Other objects are available. 'Ball' should not be taken to be representative of outdated patriarchal construct.

**Eye should not be taken to exclude those who are sensory impaired.
 
Last edited:
We were down in Dorset on the coast last week and a lot of the beaches were managed as National Trust sites. The National Trust employees all seem like good eggs - being Dorset it was mostly people in their 50s working in cafes or doing bit of what looked like voluntary work. I'd say we have a massive disconnect by the politically correct brigade who now running NT, the workforce and the people who are members. Hopefully it wont end well for the people now running NT

Couldn't agree more. The volunteers and conservators are great. The upper management are toxic.
 
I think your comments echo what's happening in many organisations and institutions.

SWMBO made a comment this morning which was bang on the nose.

Every organisation at the moment seems to be rushing to do at least something. As she said, a token effort for fear of not being seen to be on board.

Token is a very small step from tokenism, and that is a very bad place to be. Like, a 30-50 years ago place to be. It's not progress.

The sad part of this is, for the 'tokens', if I may put it like that, it's also a bad place to be. Take the new presenter of A Question of Sport, for instance. Has it been Alex Scott, many people would only have seen her colour because at the moment we're being battered with colour. She'd have ended up in a position where her credibility was shot before she even started.

That's not progress.

Take the army; the individuals within, including the BAME individuals, just get on with stuff. I can't see that the BAME guys (other gender-something descriptions are available) are chuffed to be constantly shoved to the front in PR photos.

PC for whatever reasons is running riot at the moment and the government's eye** is really off the ball*.




*Other objects are available. 'Ball' should not be taken to be representative of outdated patriarchal construct.

**Eye should not be taken to exclude those who are sensory impaired.

I just got this through to my work email. Its full of woke b0ll0cks. I've just unsubscribed after reading the first paragraph and its tailed with more BLM b0ll0cks.

FFS

Sound of Victory
Friday, 6 November 2020​

Dear Simmerit,

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After the pandemic has been defeated, huge global challenges will remain — from the demographic (such as ageing western populations and rising regional and intergenerational inequality) to the technological (like the rise of artificial intelligence, automation, under-employment, the power of Big Tech and the appropriate antitrust response).”

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Bootcamp to help get you sell products online.

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Don’t Start Looking, Startup!
20 November 2020
1pm to 2pm
Free
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A showcase of the Launchpad Competition: speak with previous winners, celebrate entrepreneurship and discuss why you too should stop searching and startup.

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FounderFuel Live: How to crack team dynamics to perform in a small team
24 November 2020
1pm to 2.15pm
Free
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Join Laura Penhaul to explore what entrepreneurs can do to foster effective team dynamics.

PROGRAMMES

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Innovating for Growth: Scale-ups
Deadline: 18 November 2020
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Free programme helping businesses to prepare for changes, capture opportunities and adapt with over £10,000 of bespoke support.

COMPETITIONS

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Black Founders in Tech
Deadline: 8 November 2020
Competition: 25 November 2020
Prize: Accolade
Find out more
TechInvest event seeking to profile London's most innovative Black founders.

Take care,

Philip
Philip Salter
Founder, The Entrepreneurs Network

PS. Join Us!
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I'd reply to the above but I need to go and throw up first.
 
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