NATIONAL INSURANCE CONTRIBUTIONS REQUIRED TO QUALIFY FOR STATE PENSION

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Clanker
Hi all,

Can anybody advise me on how many years NI contributions you have to make in order to qualify for the full state pension? I served for 25 years, 2 of which were before I turned 18 and I am trying to find out how many more years I will have to work to qualify for the full state pension.

Many thanks in advance.
 
Ring the state pension help line they will do the math, being in a pension may well have effected your state pension,iirc i would be £10 a week less due to years in RAF/CS pension scheme, i was told that i could buy years but that was expensive or get another couple of years contributions in before 67,even if i took pension at 60 from work.
So after 42 years of service i would still have to work to get what doleys get
 

The Assassin

On ROPS
On ROPs
Ring the state pension help line they will do the math, being in a pension may well have effected your state pension,iirc i would be £10 a week less due to years in RAF/CS pension scheme, i was told that i could buy years but that was expensive or get another couple of years contributions in before 67,even if i took pension at 60 from work.
So after 42 years of service i would still have to work to get what doleys get
The opt-out scheme that some employers use will lessen your state pension (think I lose £1/week but my employers scheme pays the difference) . I bought five years of contributions, £1,100 is what it cost me, but worth it.

But to answer OP question, it's 35 years of full contributary years. On the above link you can get to the Governmaent Gateway site that allows you to see what years you have paid fully and what years are defficient and can be paid (voluntary contributions)
 
Ring the state pension help line they will do the math, being in a pension may well have effected your state pension,iirc i would be £10 a week less due to years in RAF/CS pension scheme, i was told that i could buy years but that was expensive or get another couple of years contributions in before 67,even if i took pension at 60 from work.
So after 42 years of service i would still have to work to get what doleys get
The pension help line are really extraordinarily helpful. You wouldn't think they're government employees (I always assume the government are out to screw you for every last penny).
Thing to always remember is that if you served in HM Forces you were contracted out of SERPS, which means you lose money unless you make voluntary contributions.
 
Just checked my online record, you start contributing from 16, not 18.
Well mine shows I started contributing from age 14 (I'm 64 now) and have full contributions from then. Now you can't even get a National Insurance number until you're 16.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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The pension help line are really extraordinarily helpful. You wouldn't think they're government employees (I always assume the government are out to screw you for every last penny).
Thing to always remember is that if you served in HM Forces you were contracted out of SERPS, which means you lose money unless you make voluntary contributions.
They really are very helpful. I had to choose whether to make contributions for two missing years. He said it was worth it for the first year, as £300 would buy me much more in pension when the day finally arrives, but the investment for the second year, £1200, would be unlikely to be repaid as it only bought about £1.50 per month. Start with you yougov pension calculator, and call them or use the chatbox.
 
The pension help line are really extraordinarily helpful. You wouldn't think they're government employees (I always assume the government are out to screw you for every last penny).
Thing to always remember is that if you served in HM Forces you were contracted out of SERPS, which means you lose money unless you make voluntary contributions.
You shouldn't really lose, whatever you have 'lost' from the State Pension should be made up by your AFPS which was non-contributory and you paid slightly less NICs as it was contacted out.
 
You shouldn't really lose, whatever you have 'lost' from the State Pension should be made up by your AFPS which was non-contributory and you paid slightly less NICs as it was contacted out.
The way I'm using the word lost is when you look at the pension site and see the big bold numbers front and centre, lets see what you could have won (why's it always the car) then look down and see what you're actually forecast to get. Of course the MoD pension is a big bully bonus!
 
The way I'm using the word lost is when you look at the pension site and see the big bold numbers front and centre, lets see what you could have won (why's it always the car) then look down and see what you're actually forecast to get. Of course the MoD pension is a big bully bonus!
Agreed, for the vast majority who only served a few years, they probably have more than sufficient time to accumulate sufficient contributions to get a full State Pension. Even those who make it to the IPP still have quite a while before they'll draw a State Pension too, so time to make provision one way or another.
Frankly, even if you qualify for a full State Pension, if that's all you're planning to rely on in retirement, life might be tougher than you think, thank f&@£ for AFPS!
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Hi all,

Can anybody advise me on how many years NI contributions you have to make in order to qualify for the full state pension? I served for 25 years, 2 of which were before I turned 18 and I am trying to find out how many more years I will have to work to qualify for the full state pension.

Many thanks in advance.
35
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
That changed in 2006 with the Great Labour Debt being repaid, and retirement dates being postponed. Hence my need to make extra contributions.
 
Agreed, for the vast majority who only served a few years, they probably have more than sufficient time to accumulate sufficient contributions to get a full State Pension. Even those who make it to the IPP still have quite a while before they'll draw a State Pension too, so time to make provision one way or another.
Frankly, even if you qualify for a full State Pension, if that's all you're planning to rely on in retirement, life might be tougher than you think, thank f&@£ for AFPS!
I did 25 years RAF, 13 years for a civilian company, both pensions in full payment now and state pension in a couple of years. Cheers easy!
 
If you are married get your spouse to check their NI contributions. There may be gaps if they accompanied you overseas. It’s easily rectified once noticed.
 
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goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
That changed in 2006 with the Great Labour Debt being repaid, and retirement dates being postponed. Hence my need to make extra contributions.
Thanks for that but I can only go by the words the nice man in Newcastle said when I first enquired: 'Now let's see if you've got the 35 years contributions that will get you a full state pension'. Very helpful and knowledgeable he was too (which may have been mentioned earlier by someone else).
 

The Assassin

On ROPS
On ROPs
That changed in 2006 with the Great Labour Debt being repaid, and retirement dates being postponed. Hence my need to make extra contributions.
Would it be that 35 years of contributions unless you were born after a certain date, then it will be a year or two more, and likely to increase again for those born after another date.
 
Hi all,

Can anybody advise me on how many years NI contributions you have to make in order to qualify for the full state pension? I served for 25 years, 2 of which were before I turned 18 and I am trying to find out how many more years I will have to work to qualify for the full state pension.

Many thanks in advance.

35 years.

When I moved to the USA it was 30 years and I had it in the bag. Then one year when getting my pension statement from them I found out the FCUKERS had upped it to 35 years.

AsI do not live, or work, in the UK I now make voluntary contributions. By the end of the 2021/2022 year I will be up to 35 years and qualify for the full pension when it is eventually due.

If you have a shortfall you can (off the top of my head) whang in 5 years worth of back payments - I threw in a couple of years worth. Or, if you have time on your side just pay in either annually, or monthly till you have 35 years worth.


Interesting factoid: The Mrs attended a seminar a couple of weeks ago as amongst her HR duties is running payroll, and arranging personal tax/pension planning for employees. The people running the seminar advised that the unspoken of elephant in the room is that the US will have a social security pension shortfall by around 2035. Couple of reasons: 1. Dropping birth rate meaning they cannot rob Peter to pay Paul, and 2. They robbed the money to pay for the covid shite. Net result is that taxes will be going up. The factoid part is that they mentioned most euro-land countries are in a similar situation and will also have to do some serious financial jiggery pokery in the next 15 to 20 years.
 

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