Nanny State Porn Ban Incoming

@Listy
Germany is considering making it unlawful to run TOR infrastructure.
Germany considers amendment to law which makes it illegal to run a Tor node or website
Coming soon to a Home Office near you....
Well I did like you're earlier description of hte Home Office. TBH the German TOR thing, it was only a matter of time, as this huge area of influence is not under governments control, and we can't be having that.

Two questions to your expertise (if you can answer them).

1:
Earlier this was posted:
[QUOTE="MrMemory, post: 9164717, member: 149471]
The EU just made porn filters illegal[/QUOTE]

Would that not include the search engine filters that keep the light web safe for us?

2:
Earlier you said a VPN was the way to go, but specified a 'Good one'. How do we tell a good one, and how much are we looking at?
 
@Listy
National level filtering must be a nightmare. I mean, if you want to stop people looking for "bomb" you have to include "not = bath bomb" or you ban Lush soap (no bad thing, it stinks).

Probably why it is best to filter or block by hash value, which is how I think Internet Watch foundation blocks child sex abuse imagery. Known illegal imagery is assigned a value which is then filtered. Similar to signature based malware detection, known virus are blocked. Of course, unknown or "tweaked" stuff gets through until they signatures are added to the list.

VPNs. Good ones. Erm... do not use a free one. The are doing something. Paid for ones. I know the ones that tend to get good write up for privacy are things like PIA and Proton VPN.

Without access to their logs, you cannot really tell what people are doing to traffic. Ultimately if the technology is sound, you are only then worried about where the server is based for legal compliance. If they claim to be "zero knowledge", it means that there traffic is routed in such a way that the server cannot hand over identifiable data, meaning LEA gets nothing.

As well as that, it is important to make sure that you have your VPN configured correctly to avoid DNS leak. This is effectively accidentally telling your national I target address book what you want to read before going down the nice VPN tunnels.

DNS leak test

This guy is well worth reading on all things staying low profile on line. Was high tech FBI, and become wider known as a consultant to the TV show Mr Robot.

The Privacy, Security, & OSINT Show
 
I wonder whether, in their lust for statist control of the means of communication, UK and western governments have pondered the issue of what happens if they "break" the internet?

(Rhetorical question, by the way. Its clear the UK govt at least has no strategic thought process about anything).

Loading the internet with barriers, filters, taxes, single-issue mob witch-hunts, porn-shaming and criminal offences could well cause large scale turn-off by users - or could render the internet unusable or unaffordable.

What happens then to the internet's contribution to economy and government itself?

Funnily enough my area had an extended power cut (lovable travellers helping fix the transformer, apparently...) on the one day I'd set aside to pay bills, pay taxes and do some procurement. I was left wondering if the local surviving Post Office still had DVLA licence renewal forms, or if I had an ancient Yellow Pages somewhere that might give a telephone number for the Council Tax office. If the power/internet had stayed disconnected, then it'd have taken days/weeks instead of minutes to perform certain tasks (e.g. one month letter turnaround from my council currently).

If internet disconnection or throttling happens on a national scale, then i wonder how government agencies will manage now that they've mostly scrapped their means of paper communication?
 
I'm sure I read somewhere that we passed the tipping point of not being able to survive without internet in the early 2000's.

This would be in the realm of big utilities, banking infrastructure, govt agencies etc not the realm of the average bod doing online shopping/looking at eBay.

I think it would be very hard to revert back to a paper/manual system and disconnect the network side now.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
If internet disconnection or throttling happens on a national scale, then i wonder how government agencies will manage now that they've mostly scrapped their means of paper communication?
In light of the HMRC filure to make online tax submissions foolproof or even simple (Thanks Private Eye) I decided to phone them and tell them that in future all submissions from me for anything will be in paper and they can calculate my taxes owed. They agreed and gave me a huge rebate and refunded the fines levied for failing to submit on time.
If everyone does a paper return they will have to relent!
I simply told them I didn't have a computer with a reliable or safe and secure connection to submit anything and their system consistently refused to recognise me online!
 
On an aside, the impact of wide scale forced de-connection would in all likelihood be severe.

The Americans are publically admitted that though they may have the most advanced capabilties; but perhaps are the most vulnerable.

Stuxnet is something that many will be aware of; for the societal impact, have a read of

The Untold Story of NotPetya, the Most Devastating Cyberattack in History

This is a limited attack - imagine (or perhaps not) the effect of unrestricted cyber-warfare.

It really would be like the Cylon strike on Caprica in the reboot of Battlestar Galactica.

Anyway, sleep well tonight.
 
Didn't think I would say this - but if she and others like her were around now, our plague of predators and legitimised weirdos might think twice before targeting kids in this country for their own grubby little games and twisted beliefs.
 
Some people think it's not hard to break the internet

I must admit, I had a day off today and achieved a long time goal by visiting Bletchley Park.

Its was when I was walking around the co-located National Museum of Computing, that I remembered I was wearing the below shirt...

51GgCtOODqL._UX342_.jpg
 
I wonder whether, in their lust for statist control of the means of communication, UK and western governments have pondered the issue of what happens if they "break" the internet?

(Rhetorical question, by the way. Its clear the UK govt at least has no strategic thought process about anything).

Loading the internet with barriers, filters, taxes, single-issue mob witch-hunts, porn-shaming and criminal offences could well cause large scale turn-off by users - or could render the internet unusable or unaffordable.

What happens then to the internet's contribution to economy and government itself?

Funnily enough my area had an extended power cut (lovable travellers helping fix the transformer, apparently...) on the one day I'd set aside to pay bills, pay taxes and do some procurement. I was left wondering if the local surviving Post Office still had DVLA licence renewal forms, or if I had an ancient Yellow Pages somewhere that might give a telephone number for the Council Tax office. If the power/internet had stayed disconnected, then it'd have taken days/weeks instead of minutes to perform certain tasks (e.g. one month letter turnaround from my council currently).

If internet disconnection or throttling happens on a national scale, then i wonder how government agencies will manage now that they've mostly scrapped their means of paper communication?
The application of control of focussed on the WWW as opposed to the internet as a whole.
 
Must admit I was surprised that this ban got through. I would have thought the MP's and Lords would have killed anything that got between them and their pleasure stone dead!
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Everyone is assuming, for some unknown reason that flies in the face of all recent evidence, that this law is going to be enforced competently. If you've ever lived in a country with restrictive national level firewalling, you probably found that there was plenty of verboten stuff you could still access, because any blacklist system requires a list, and that has to be updated. The fundamental problem the HO have is that the technology sector moves about an order of magnitude quicker than they do. Sure, Pornhub might get firewalled, but I'm fairly sure there will still be many, many sites which are still accessible simply because the HO have one person updating a nearly infinite list, who has a less than exhaustive knowledge of world geopornography, and who has to have it approved in triplicate by forty people above them.

Even so, let's be optimistic and assume they run the blacklist efficiently: that is still only a fraction of what is out there. I suspect P2P will suddenly become a lot more popular. Everyone will learn how to torrent again, like back in the ole Napster days, which is nearly impossible to block using a traditional firewall. Or, to be a bit more modern, what about live cam sites run from disposable server instances which only exist for a couple of weeks before changing address? I highly doubt the HO are going to have the resources or wit to deal with those.

Ultimately, the porn industry has no incentive to eagerly enforce UK law, and 99.9999% of porn sites are hosted outside of the UK. I suspect we'll find that there is still a whole lot of easily accessible stuff out there come April 1st (or whenever it is).
 
Ultimately, the porn industry has no incentive to eagerly enforce UK law, and 99.9999% of porn sites are hosted outside of the UK. I suspect we'll find that there is still a whole lot of easily accessible stuff out there come April 1st (or whenever it is).
Yes they do, Money. Several of the big players are owned by Mindgeek, whom has been given the rights to running this scheme. They're the ones charging us, and organising it.
 
Yes they do, Money. Several of the big players are owned by Mindgeek, whom has been given the rights to running this scheme. They're the ones charging us, and organising it.
but organising it within the UK...

As soon as your IP address is outside the UK, it's end of sports.
 
Everyone is assuming, for some unknown reason that flies in the face of all recent evidence, that this law is going to be enforced competently.
I like that - it just about sums up the way the politicians, lawmakers and government work in the UK.

Have a like... :)

 

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