Naming of Barracks

#1
Is there a naming convention for British Army Camps? For example the names of battles, Generals or VC recipients (although the latter seem to get gyms and cookhouses named after them), and how are they decided?

Will we be seeing Lashkar Gah Bks or Sangin Lines anytime soon?
 
#2
As the Armed Forces are reduced I can't see any new Barracks being named, so it's a bit of a moot point really.
 
#4
British Army barracks, as opposed to Naval or
Marine barracks, are named on the basis of various principles, usually depending
on the whim of the units resident there at the time of the naming ceremony.
This often occurs at the time they are built or undergo a major overhaul.
However, once named, it is highly unusual for the name to change - for any
reason. Interestingly, most Traditional Regimental Barracks are named after
very important personalities or concepts associated with the regiment resident
there at the time of naming. Examples include Princess Royal Barracks, Deepcut,
Surrey; Buller Barracks, Aldershot; Browning Barracks, Aldershot; Victoria
Barracks, Windsor; Wellington Barracks, London; etc These names carry
indisputable weight in British Political and Military History. HRH The Princess
Royal, is none other than Princess Anne, Queen Elizabeth II's only daughter.
General Sir Redvers Buller was the Commander of British Forces in South Africa
(1st Army Corps) during the Boer War until he was superseded by Field Marshal
Lord Roberts following successive British defeats in December 1899 and January
1900. Lieutenant-General Frederick Browning was the first GOC of the famous 1st
Airborne Division during World War 2. It was he who introduced the maroon beret
as the headdress for the Division and adopted the Pegasus symbol - Bellerophon
astride winged Pegasus - as the emblem of British Airborne Forces in general.
Queen Victoria needs no introduction. The Duke of Wellington commanded British
forces at the battle of Waterloo which effectively ended the Napoleonic Wars.
Templer Barracks in Ashford is named after a former Intelligence Corps
Director. Lieutenant-General Gerald Templer (also known as the "Tiger of
Malaya") was High Commissioner and Director of Operations in Malaysia during the
Malayan Emergency. He is credited with the counter-insurgency military campaign
and 'Hearts and Minds' policy which defeated the communist Malayan Races
Liberation Army. Tactics perfected for the SAS under Templer have since been
employed all over the world in low intensity operations designed to isolate
insurgents from their base of support while simultanously introducing reforms
that can erode their appeal. Mercury Barracks in Rothenbach/Birgelen was
named after the planet Mercury - messenger of the gods. It was so named by the
Royal Corps of Signals. The Corps Cap Badge shows "The figure of Mercury holding
a Caduceus in the left hand, the right hand aloft poised with the left foot on a
globe all silver above the globe a scroll inscribed 'Certa Cito' and below on
each side six laurel leaves all gold, the whole ensigned with the Crown in
gold." The Corps motto "Certa Cito", means "Swift and Sure".


On the other hand, shortly after a war or military
campaign, new barracks are typically named after a significant battle honour



There is a LOT more info on there



From here: Barracks
 
#5
Barracks within larger camps seem to follow a theme.

Catterick = WW1 campaigns (Ypres, Gaza, Vimy, Helles etc)

Colchester = Mostly British India (Goojerat, Sobraon, Hyderabad, Kirkee etc)

Tidworth = British Indian cantonments (Aliwal, Delhi, Mooltan etc)

Aldershot = The old barracks were Wars of the Spanish Succession, Seven Years War & French Revolutionary/Napoleonic Wars (Oudenarde, Salamanca, Tournai, Badajos, Waterloo etc) then various Generals etc (Buller, Montgomery, Browning, Travers etc)

Bordon = The old barracks were various campaigns in the Americas (Guadeloupe, Louisburg, Havannah, Quebec etc)

Longmoor = Various bits and pieces referring to South African Campaign (Kitchener, Ladysmith)

BAOR & Berlin = Bit of a mixture, but mostly British regional (Caithness, Northampton, Ripon, Rochdale, Stornoway etc), Generals etc (Smuts, Harding, Rowcroft etc) and battles (Assaye, Salamanca, Albuhera)

Nowadays they would probably be named after X Factor finalists.
 
#9
Perhaps some other corporate sponsorship . .

Coca Cola Lines

Sodexo Barracks

RAF BAE This might get confusing

or possibly

RM Base Savile

Piers Morgan Bks
 
#10
I'm struggling to find anything on a Field Marshall 6 Petroleum Storage Depot. Was he one of the Worcestershire branch of Petroleum Storage Depots? I'm sure I went to school with one of them.
 
#11
How about rechristening the barracks just before they close: "That Theiving **** Blair Barracks!" "Camerons Legacy Barracks!" "Thanks Lads, Now **** Off Barracks!" "Gordon Evil One Eye Broon Barracks!"
 
#12
As Baldrick/Blackadder Lines has been used a couple of times now perhaps a chance to make it permanant but where? A cunning plan perhaps?
The opening sequence of the Blackadder Goes Forth series was shot at the old Cavalry Barracks site in Colchester. I think that a number of the buildings still stand but have been incorporated into a housing development. Rather curiously, Tony Robinson (Baldrick) was back outside the site a number of years later, filming a Time Team dig of a Roman racetrack.
 
#14
Then there were 'Lines' - old dudes may remember Waterloo Lines, Seedaseer Lines, Singapore Lines.
Barracks within Camps, Barracks within Garrisons (Tidworth, Nee Soon, etc). In India they had Lines and Barracks within Cantonments (still do, I think).
Barracks with no names: The Barracks, Berwick (although they were originally called Ravensdowne Barracks - after the street they abutted). And Forts, Fort George, for example, and Tregantle (once accommodated an infantry Bn).

Wow! Slow morning!
 
#16
Then there were 'Lines' - old dudes may remember Waterloo Lines, Seedaseer Lines, Singapore Lines.
Barracks within Camps, Barracks within Garrisons (Tidworth, Nee Soon, etc). In India th*ey had Lines and Barracks within Cantonments (still do, I think).
Barracks with no names: The Barracks, Berwick (although they were originally called Ravensdowne Barracks - after the street they abutted). And Forts, Fort George, for example, and Tregantle (once accommodated an infantry Bn).

Wow! Slow morning!
I spent some time at Tregantle Fort when we were doing some adventure training on Dartmoor. An old Palmerston Fort and quite impressive with walls metres thick. Not very cosy though and a bit ramshackle. The old keep was OOB because it was collapsing. Don't know what it's used for now. The ranges are still there and it's still MoD owned.

There was another old fort nearby (Scraesdon) which wasn't occupied but used for assault training. Didn't realise that you needed training to assault someone. Thought it came naturally.
 
#17
The barracks in Bulford Camp (and most of the street names) are all named after New Zealand towns as the ANZACs spent most of Bulford's early years based there.
 
#20
I spent some time at Tregantle Fort when we were doing some adventure training on Dartmoor. An old Palmerston Fort and quite impressive with walls metres thick. Not very cosy though and a bit ramshackle. The old keep was OOB because it was collapsing. Don't know what it's used for now. The ranges are still there and it's still MoD owned.

There was another old fort nearby (Scraesdon) which wasn't occupied but used for assault training. Didn't realise that you needed training to assault someone. Thought it came naturally.
My Grandfather enlisted into the Highland Light Infantry in 1898 and after basic induction training at the HLI/Cameronians Depot in Dumbarton, he was posted to 1st Battalion in January 1899, just after the Headquarters and three Rifle Companies had moved to Fort Tregantle. The remaining four Rifle Companies were stationed in Millbay Barracks, Plymouth before re-locating to Raglan Barracks in Plymout. Fort Tregantle was then taken over by the Reserves and soldiers about to be discharged whilst the remainder of the HLI deployed to South Africa on board the requisitioned Troopship SS Auriania which left from Southampton on 23 October 1899.
 
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