NAAFI Poster Hard Hitting or Nasty?

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by BuggerAll, Jun 29, 2006.

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  1. BuggerAll

    BuggerAll LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    There is a poster in the window of the ‘NAAFI Financial’ Office opposite the family NAAFI in Episkopi with a picture of a chap who has lost his legs and is in a wheel chair with the headline: “The Road from Basra to Baghdad in a Landrover is tough but thats nothing compared to life on civvy street in a wheelchair ".

    If this poster was being used to advertise BLESMA or the RBL it would be a good one, but it isn’t its an advert for NAAFI’s accident insurance.

    Now I’ve no doubt NAAFI will argue that it’s a hard hitting campaign designed to shake young men out of their complacency about insurance matters, rather than a cynical ploy by a dodgy bunch of insurance scammers to exploit the fears of soldiers in order to sell them expensive insurance.

    Which ever view you take I think that it is inappropriate (to put it mildly) that NAAFI have chosen to put this poster up outside the family NAAFI. Families are aware of the risks their loved ones are taking but they don’t really want it rammed down their throats every time they go shopping. Perhaps I’m oversensitive.

    Edited to get the quote from the poster more accurate.
     
  2. No, sknn, I think you are right.

    I'm being forced to realise the demands of advertising... and as they say, there's no such thing as bad publicity...

    But this does seem a bit off the mark, and I agree with you that it's because it's NAAFI. I kind of expect a poster from NAFFI being more positive, such as a p... wet squadie in a dugout enjoying a Mars bar... but that's not going to sell insurance. Perhaps the problem is that we expect NAAFI to be on our side.... and not engage in hard sell towards us... or (considering their monopoly) make us the obvious customer or dare I say it... victim.

    NAAFI Insurance advertises on this site... I wonder what they have to say? And the rest of you... Is this offensive?

    (As an aside - my posters offering a bullet with your name on were banned as potentially offensive, by SOD-YA magasine. It'll be interesting to see if they now accept this one.)
     
  3. If it gets just one soldier who subsequently becomes disabled to buy insurance now it's worth it. Also, as in reality it's often the wives who are the ones that sort out insurances etc it's the wives that need to be targetted with this hard reminder to get insurance cover sorted out now!
    This sounds like a poster that says what it does on the tin. A life on civvy street with no legs and very little money offends far more later! Anyone who chooses to fail to insure will, with this hard hitting poster, at least know that they were warned.
     
  4. IS Ski Geek

    IS Ski Geek War Hero Moderator

    No doubt knowing naafi it will have some small print that tells you it is not valid in a time of war, terrorism, act of god, bad weather, theft, accidental damage. Oh yeah and you must have a reciept for everything otherwise you aint getting a penny out of us. Even though we have taken your money for 15 years.

    PS not that naafi insurance do that of course. :wink:
     
  5. While I of course trust the Naafi implicitly, I would question the ethics of the advert.

    We of course know that HMG will look after anyone in HM Forces and back them all the way, including financially.

    So there is no need for a Naafi 'just in case my legs fall off' policy even if the wife insists.

    A non-profit organisation that in my experience has, tried to shaft me on my car finance, blocked the outside financing of a squadron bar, sold me OWN rations back in FI, closed all the decent food outlets in FI, managed to sell duty free more expensively than the high street can't be all bad but HMG are still probably a safer bet.
     
  6. Sliding Doors has hit the nail on the head – life on civvy street following disablement is a struggle for all affected, despite support from HM Forces.

    The NAAFI Financial poster features an ex-Royal Anglian who was injured by an explosion whilst on patrol in 1989, 2 days before his 19th Birthday. We believe in making it real, hence the image of an ex-serviceman who was fully behind our campaign to raise awareness of the importance of Personal Accident insurance.

    Not lacking in sensitivity, we consulted a cross section of military personnel and their dependents to get their reaction before releasing this and other material featuring similarly hard-hitting images. Feedback suggested that a bold, direct approach was in fact required to get to the heart of the matter and highlight the real need for insurance; from kit to life insurance. Since the launch of this campaign follow-up with dependents has indicated they remain supportive of the message, as it made them focus on their own family lifestyle and review their needs.

    Research into other widely publicised campaigns on emotive issues like drink driving and smoking - all hazardous with the potential to endanger life - confirmed that factual and blunt techniques for delivering key messages have become accepted, and the norm.

    NAAFI Financial’s campaign to highlight the value of insurance stems from our experience of insuring over 72,000 serving personnel. We know there is a concern over the provision of life insurance for example, and we are proud to have never withdrawn cover for those deployed to Iraq and other areas of conflict. In a sense the facts speak for themselves:

    · We have underwritten in excess of £1 billion of Life and Personal Accident cover over the past 3 years and, sad though it is to record, the value of this has been all too often demonstrated when casualties have occurred in Iraq and elsewhere
    · We have twice guaranteed free accidental death cover of £10,000 to all those engaged in fire fighting duties of Operation Fresco
    · We have contributed just under £4 million to the Forces Welfare Fund since 1999

    We are determined to provide a service that genuinely meets the unique needs of Service personnel and their dependents, whether in the UK or overseas, at home or on operations.



    NAAFI Financial is a trading style of Close Brothers Military Services Limited in the UK and NAAFI in Germany and Cyprus. Both companies are appointed representatives for general insurance only, of Close Brothers Limited. Close Brothers Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority. Close Brothers Military Services Limited is registered in England No. 3302028. Registered office: Britannia Suite, Old Sarum Park, Salisbury, SP4 6ES.
     
  7. BuggerAll

    BuggerAll LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    Service child: Mummy, why have they got a picture of a man with no legs sitting in a wheel chair?

    Service wife: Well he was a soldier and he had his legs blown off when he went to war.

    Service child: Daddy has gone to war, will he get his legs blown off?

    Service wife: He might, but we'll be better off 'cause we've got NAAFI insurance....
     

  8. You did it to attract service personnel to your insurance facilities. You want them to spend thier money with you and not with another agency. Nothing more, nothing less.
     
  9. That's lucky, I agree.

    And they're too late to quote me happy.
     
  10. It's good of NAAFI to respond, though if the soldier in question lost his legs in an accident in 1989, isn't the title, “The Road from Basra to Baghdad in a Landrover is tough but thats nothing compared to life on civvy street in a wheelchair" a bit misleading? Does the policy actually cover risks in Iraq? If not, perhaps Trading Standards should be asked to comment.

    edited, because I hadn't read the small print:

    NAAFI says that it hasn't withdrawn cover from personnel in Iraq, but will it give new cover to personnel out there?
     
  11. It's all about the money. Don't believe anything else. They are not the 'soldiers friend', they are like any other business, they are in it for profit. It would be niaive to believe otherwise.
     
  12. I like this advert. Think of the majority of us - we don't notice the nice fluffy bunny adverts, and insurance is boring.... therefore it makes sense to shock us into action.

    I squared away the accident insurance before I came out to Iraq, and, because nights are longer when you are stagging on, I read my terms and conditions book for said insurance. Well guess what lads? It doesn't cover you for NBC attacks, they can call an exclusion period if they want, and it doesn't actually say anywhere that you are covered for war or for being in Iraq...

    I did the naffi one because it covered me straight away, and if you leave something to the last minute, you take what you can get. It is your own fault if you don't do something that you know you need to. Next time though I will be doing PAX, and I will be doing it early enough. :oops:

    Fair play to the lad in the picture, for being willing to help out. I'm sure he did it for free of course, because he's not a big company trying to make a profit out of anyone.... It must be difficult to draw attention to yourself under those circumstances.
     

  13. I noticed the posters in the NAAFI yesterday and thought that's enough to give the kids nightmares ....I also think it's misleading
     
  14. spike7451

    spike7451 RIP

    Hats off to the NAAFI for coming on here & making a statement If this was Watchdog & a different company,I doubt the'd do the same.I myself have'nt seen the poster so I'm not going to comment on it.
     
  15. In answer to specific questions from Putteesinmyhands and BoredInIraq:

    “NAAFI says that it hasn't withdrawn cover from personnel in Iraq, but will it give new cover to personnel out there?”

    YES – we provide Personal Accident cover immediately wherever you are deployed. As well as providing accidental death cover, if you select the optional Life cover available with the Personal Accident policy you can be covered for death by natural causes too.


    “I read my terms and conditions book for said insurance. Well guess what lads? It doesn't cover you for NBC attacks, they can call an exclusion period if they want, and it doesn't actually say anywhere that you are covered for war or for being in Iraq...”

    Our Personal Accident cover does not cover accidental death resulting directly or indirectly from NBC terrorism, but does cover injuries arising from the same. Life insurance taken out prior to notice to deploy will cover you for NBC attacks.

    You are right – like other insurers we have the option to call an exclusion period, but history shows that we have stood by you and not withdrawn cover, despite other insurers withdrawing from the market at the height of recent conflicts.

    You may be interested to note that to date we have paid out on two policies without receiving a single premium. We believe this further demonstrates our commitment.

    And finally, being covered for war or for being in Iraq is not mentioned in the Personal Accident policy booklet because it is not excluded – a list of what you are covered for has the potential to be endless, and even more tedious to read than these documents already can be.


    NAAFI Financial is a trading style of Close Brothers Military Services Limited in the UK and NAAFI in Germany and Cyprus. Both companies are appointed representatives for general insurance only, of Close Brothers Limited. Close Brothers Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority. Close Brothers Military Services Limited is registered in England No. 3302028. Registered office: Britannia Suite, Old Sarum Park, Salisbury, SP4 6ES.