N Korean nuclear strike could cause chaos in US

The following is a North Korea story that is really a Japan-South Korea conflict story.
www.cbc.ca/news/world/japan-south-korea-sanctions-claim-un-1.5209312?cmp=rss
South Korea has been in Japan's cross-hairs recently due to a South Korean court ruling that Japanese companies can be held liable for their abuses committed during WWII. This has been a long standing irritant between the two countries.

Japan has recently reacted to the South Korean court ruling by cutting off supplies of essential semi-conductor manufacturing materials to South Korea's high tech industry. These Japanese trade sanctions against South Korea have the potential to have major effects on South Korea's economy, with additional economic damage radiating out to the rest of the world.

Now Japan is trying to retroactively justify applying trade sanctions to South Korea on the basis that South Korea is violating trade sanctions with respect to North Korea and that South Korea cannot be trusted with the possession of sensitive high tech materials.
Tokyo last week tightened the approval process for Japanese shipments of photoresists and other sensitive materials to South Korea, saying such materials can be exported only to trustworthy trading partners. The move, which could potentially hurt South Korean technology companies that manufacture semiconductors and display screens used in TVs and smartphones, has triggered a full-blown diplomatic dispute between the countries that further soured relations long troubled over Japan's brutal colonial rule of Korea before the end of the Second World War.
South Korea is now demanding an international investigation into Japan's claims and actions by the UN or some other body.
South Korea said Friday it wants an investigation by the United Nations or another international body as it continues to reject Japanese claims that Seoul could not be trusted to faithfully implement sanctions against North Korea.

Kim You-geun, deputy chief of South Korea's presidential national security office, said South Korea has been thoroughly implementing UN sanctions against North Korea over its nuclear weapons program. He demanded that Japan provide evidence for claims made by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his conservative aides that there may have been illegal transfers of sensitive materials from South Korea to North Korea.
The South Koreans are saying that if this investigation shows that South Korea has done nothing wrong (which they say they haven't), then the Japanese must both apologize and withdraw the trade sanctions, and there should be an investigation into Japan's actions.
"If the result of the investigation reveals that our government did something wrong, our government will apologize for it and immediately apply measures to correct it," said Kim, reading a prepared statement on live TV.

"If the result shows that our government has done nothing wrong, the Japanese government should not only apologize but also immediately withdraw the exports restrictions that have the characteristics of a [political] retaliation. There also should be a thorough investigation on [any] Japanese violation," he said.
I have not yet seen anything which suggests that the Japanese have presented a shred of evidence to support their claims against South Korea, and it has all the appearance of Japan attempting to bully and coerce the South Korean government into politically intervening in their judicial system to overrule the South Korean court in favour of the Japanese companies.
 
The following is a North Korea story that is really a Japan-South Korea conflict story.
www.cbc.ca/news/world/japan-south-korea-sanctions-claim-un-1.5209312?cmp=rss
South Korea has been in Japan's cross-hairs recently due to a South Korean court ruling that Japanese companies can be held liable for their abuses committed during WWII. This has been a long standing irritant between the two countries.

Japan has recently reacted to the South Korean court ruling by cutting off supplies of essential semi-conductor manufacturing materials to South Korea's high tech industry. These Japanese trade sanctions against South Korea have the potential to have major effects on South Korea's economy, with additional economic damage radiating out to the rest of the world.

Now Japan is trying to retroactively justify applying trade sanctions to South Korea on the basis that South Korea is violating trade sanctions with respect to North Korea and that South Korea cannot be trusted with the possession of sensitive high tech materials.


South Korea is now demanding an international investigation into Japan's claims and actions by the UN or some other body.


The South Koreans are saying that if this investigation shows that South Korea has done nothing wrong (which they say they haven't), then the Japanese must both apologize and withdraw the trade sanctions, and there should be an investigation into Japan's actions.


I have not yet seen anything which suggests that the Japanese have presented a shred of evidence to support their claims against South Korea, and it has all the appearance of Japan attempting to bully and coerce the South Korean government into politically intervening in their judicial system to overrule the South Korean court in favour of the Japanese companies.
playing for a few hundred years now
 
Nuclear talks in doubt as North Korea tests ballistic missiles, envoy cancels trip - Reuters
Two more SRBM tests by DPRK:
North Korea test-fired two new short-range ballistic missiles on Thursday, South Korean officials said, its first missile test since its leader, Kim Jong Un, and U.S. President Donald Trump agreed to revive denuclearisation talks last month.
Whether these are the same type as fired in May, or whether they're a new type is uncertain at the moment:
North Korea launched the missiles from the east coast city of Wonsan with one flying about 430 km (267 miles) and the other 690 km (428 miles) over the sea. They both reached an altitude of 50 km (30 miles), an official at South Korea’s Defense Ministry said.

Some analysts said the North appeared to have retested missiles it fired in May, but two South Korean military officials said the missiles appeared to be a new design.
Ri and Pompeo were due to meet next week, but apparently Ri has pulled out of the talks at the Southeast Asian security forum:
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho had been expected to meet on the sidelines of a Southeast Asian security forum in Bangkok next week.

But a diplomatic source told Reuters on Thursday that Ri had canceled his trip to the conference.

The White House, Pentagon and U.S. State Department did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
 
North Korea said that their latest "nonstop super-powerful weapon systems" was intended as a warning to South Korea to stop "double dealing" by saying they want peace while importing new weapons and conducting exercises.
www.cbc.ca/news/world/north-korea-missile-warning-1.5225747?cmp=rss
"We cannot but develop nonstop super-powerful weapon systems to remove the potential and direct threats to the security of our country that exist in the South," Kim said, according to KCNA.

He accused South Koreans of "double dealing" for saying they support peace but simultaneously importing new weapons and conducting military drills.

South Korea's leader should stop such "suicidal acts" and "should not make a mistake of ignoring the warning," Kim said.
The US appear rather sanguine about the test of short range missiles. They said that the commitments given by North Korea were to not test nuclear weapons or long range ballistic missiles. It appears that so long as North Korea restrict their testing to short range missiles the US isn't going to get too upset over it and plan to continue negotiating.
When asked what message the Trump administration was taking from North Korea's launch of short-range missiles, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told Fox News, "When the president and Chairman Kim were together now just a few weeks back in the DMZ, Chairman Kim made two commitments."

"One, he said he'd commit not to conduct any nuclear tests and that he would continue to avoid launching intermediate-range and long-range ballistic missiles. He also said that he would put his negotiating team back in the game, that we'd have another round of negotiations, and we're working our way towards that."
The US also added that they see the recent North Korean tests as much less dangerous than what North Korea were doing prior to the current series of talks and that the recent fireworks shows were just posturing prior to the next round of negotiating.
"North Korea was engaged in activity before we were having diplomatic conversations far worse than this, more importantly far more dangerous for America and Japan and for South Korea than this. I think this allows the negotiations to go forward. You know, lots of countries posture before they come to the table," Pompeo told Fox News.
 
North Korea has fired a few more short range missiles into the sea in their latest series of tests at their usual test site.
North Korea on Wednesday fired several unidentified projectiles off its east coast, South Korea's military said, less than a week after the North launched two short-range ballistic missiles into the sea.

South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement the latest launches were done from the North's Hodo peninsula on the east coast, a regular weapons launch site. It said South Korea's military is monitoring for possible additional launches by North Korea.
There is no news yet of anyone's reaction to this, but the US weren't particularly concerned over the previous tests.
 
The North Koreans say that the latest missile test (mentioned in a previous post) was personally supervised by Kim Jong-un. I suspect this is intended to add political and diplomatic emphasis to what might otherwise be considered a normal weapons test, although no mention of South Korea or the US was made in the announcement.
North Korea has said Kim supervised the first test of the same rocket artillery system on Wednesday. KCNA said Kim expressed "great satisfaction" over Friday's tests, which it said confirmed the system's "altitude control level flight performance, track changing capability, accuracy of hitting a target and warhead explosion power of the guided ordnance rocket."

The report didn't include any direct mention of the United States or South Korea.
The North Koreans describe the missiles as a "large-calibre multiple launch guided rocket system."
South Korea's military had also concluded the weapons North Korea tested on Wednesday are ballistic missiles and maintained its assessment even after the North described them as a newly developed "large-calibre multiple launch guided rocket system."
The range appeared to be 220 kilometres.
South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said Friday's launches were conducted at 2:59 a.m. and 3:23 a.m. from an eastern coastal area and the projectiles flew 220 kilometres. The range would be enough to cover the metropolitan area surrounding Seoul, where about half of South Koreans live, and a major U.S. military base just outside the city.
 
$2Bn hacked from banks and crypto currency exchanges by the DPRK according to a UN report seen by Reuters:
North Korea has generated an estimated $2 billion for its weapons of mass destruction programs using “widespread and increasingly sophisticated” cyberattacks to steal from banks and cryptocurrency exchanges, according to a confidential U.N. report seen by Reuters on Monday.
Despite not exploding a nuke or firing another ICBM over somebody elses territory, they are still enhancing their nuke and missile programmes:
Pyongyang also “continued to enhance its nuclear and missile programmes although it did not conduct a nuclear test or ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) launch,” said the report to the U.N. Security Council North Korea sanctions committee by independent experts monitoring compliance over the past six months.
The report apparently delivered to the UN last week shows they are using cyberspace to launch increasingly sophisticated attacks and the money acquired is syphoned off into their WMD programmes:
The experts said North Korea “used cyberspace to launch increasingly sophisticated attacks to steal funds from financial institutions and cryptocurrency exchanges to generate income.” They also used cyberspace to launder the stolen money, the report said.

“Democratic People’s Republic of Korea cyber actors, many operating under the direction of the Reconnaissance General Bureau, raise money for its WMD (weapons of mass destruction) programmes, with total proceeds to date estimated at up to two billion US dollars,” the report said.
35 instances in 17 countries:
The experts said they are investigating “at least 35 reported instances of DPRK actors attacking financial institutions, cryptocurrency exchanges and mining activity designed to earn foreign currency” in some 17 countries.
 
The North Koreans have conducted another short range missile test, their fourth in two weeks.




Kim supposedly supervised the launch personally.



The tests are apparently a response to US and South Korean military exercises currently going on now.
KCNA said the launches early Tuesday verified the reliability and combat ability of the newly developed missiles.

The agency reported Kim expressed satisfaction and said the launches would "send an adequate warning to the joint military drill now underway by the U.S. and south Korean authorities."
 
Trump says that Kim has apologised to him for the recent missile tests and the two of them are looking forward to meeting each other again soon.
U.S. President Donald Trump said Saturday that North Korea's Kim Jong-un wants to meet once again to "start negotiations" after joint U.S.-South Korea military exercises end. He also said Kim apologized for the flurry of recent short-range missile tests that has rattled U.S. allies in the region.
I haven't seen the letter which Kim sent to Trump, so I'll take the American version of what it said with a grain of salt for now.

Kim is apparently not pleased with the American military exercises taking place in South Korea, but has promised to stop testing missiles once the exercises are over, so everything is fine on that front.
Trump is tweeting more details from the "beautiful" three-page letter he told reporters on Friday that he'd received from Kim. Trump, who is on vacation at his golf club in New Jersey, said Kim spent much of his letter complaining about "the ridiculous and expensive exercises," which North Korea sees as a threat.

He said Kim offered him "a small apology" for the recent tests and assured him "that this testing would stop when the exercises end." North Korea on Saturday fired what appeared to be two short-range ballistic missiles into the sea, according to South Korea's military — the fifth round of launches in less than three weeks.

"I look forward to seeing Kim Jong-un in the not too distant future!" Trump wrote.
It's nice to see the Americans getting along well with someone though.
 
@terminal - in the last three weeks, you have made two thirds of the posts on this thread. That's just this page.

Looking at the last page (covering a couple months), 9 of 20 are your posts.

Is this your specialist subject? Perhaps a doctorate in Korean Peninsula International Relations is in the works?

You certainly seem to have a keen interest in it anyway.
 
@terminal - in the last three weeks, you have made two thirds of the posts on this thread. That's just this page.

Looking at the last page (covering a couple months), 9 of 20 are your posts.

Is this your specialist subject? Perhaps a doctorate in Korean Peninsula International Relations is in the works?

You certainly seem to have a keen interest in it anyway.
I'm just posting and summarising the news stories as they come up on the CBC. If not many other people are commenting at this time, I suspect it's because most people have probably lost interest since Kim hasn't done anything really dramatic in a while. As such, I would take that as a sign of progress.
 
I think NK can make some foreign revenue quite well, if they set up a few restaurants around London and have Uber Eats or Deliveroo do home deliveries of fresh kimchi, Korean BBQ and other food..
 
North Korea is not pleased with South Korea at the moment, and say they aren't talking to them. The North's complaint has to do with South Korean military exercises with the US.
The spokesperson repeated criticism that the joint U.S.-South Korea drills were a sign of Seoul's hostility against the North.

"As it will be clear, we have nothing more to talk about with South Korean authorities and we have no desire to sit down with them again," the North's spokesperson for the committee for the peaceful reunification of the country said.
However, the budding friendship between Kim and Trump seems intact. Indeed, the North went on to tell the South to forget about being friends with the North, now that the North is talking with the US. It sounds a bit like adolescent girls arguing.
"As it will be clear, we have nothing more to talk about with South Korean authorities and we have no desire to sit down with them again," the North's spokesperson for the committee for the peaceful reunification of the country said. (...)

The spokesperson left open the possibility of talks with the United States, speaking of upcoming dialogue between the two countries, but warned it will have no place for the South.

"South Korea is poking around hoping to reap the benefits of future dialogue between the North and the United States but it will be a good idea to give up such foolishness," the unnamed spokesperson said.
The North also tested two more "projectiles", but nobody else appears to be too bothered about it.
South Korea's military said the North fired two more projectiles into the sea on Friday from an area on the country's eastern coast. South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff did not immediately say what the weapons were or how far they flew.
On Thursday South Korea celebrated the anniversary of their independence from Japanese colonial rule. President Moon said he intends to continue with his policy of dialogue with the North, so he doesn't seem to be taking the recent noises from the North too seriously.
Moon said in a Liberation Day address on Thursday, marking Korea's independence from Japan's 1910-45 colonial rule, that it was to the credit of his policy of Korean national peace that dialogue with the North was still possible.

"In spite of a series of worrying actions taken by North Korea recently, the momentum for dialogue remains unshaken," Moon said.
It is quite possible that the latest pronouncements from Pyongyang may be routine bombast timed in response to South Korean libration day celebrations.
 

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