N.Korea... doing something good... NO WAY... yes way...!!!

#1
North Korea agreed to take steps towards nuclear disarmament under a groundbreaking deal struck on Tuesday that will bring the impoverished communist state more than $300 million (154 million pounds) worth of aid.

Under the agreement, which was reached by six countries in Beijing after nearly a week of talks, Pyongyang will freeze the reactor at the heart of its nuclear programme and allow international inspections of the site.

"This progress marks another firm and important step towards the denuclearisation of the peninsula," China's chief delegate, Wu Dawei, told the closing session of the talks, which was carried live on television from the heavily guarded Diaoyutai state guesthouse.

"It is favourable for the peace process in northeast Asia and for the improvement of ties between relevant countries," he said, after which delegates rose hesitatingly to their feet in restrained applause.

The proposed plan hammered out by the two Koreas, the United States, Japan, Russia, and China will only be the first step in locating and dismantling North Korea's nuclear arms activities, leaving many crucial questions to future negotiations.

"This is only one phase of denuclearisation. We're not done," chief U.S. negotiator Christopher Hill said.

As details of the draft leaked out earlier, Japan was already voicing doubt that any agreement could be made to stick, and a prominent U.S. conservative decried it as a "very bad deal".

John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said the Communist state should not be rewarded with "massive shipments of heavy fuel oil" for only partially dismantling its nuclear programme.

"It sends exactly the wrong signal to would-be proliferators around the world," he told CNN.

OIL, POWER MAY FOLLOW

Under the agreement, North Korea must take the steps within 60 days, and in return it will receive 50,000 tonnes of fuel oil or economic aid of equal value.

It will receive another 950,000 tonnes of fuel oil or equivalent when it takes further steps to disable its nuclear capabilities, including providing a complete inventory of its plutonium -- the fuel used in Pyongyang's first nuclear test blast in October.

The 100,000 tones of fuel would be worth around $330 million at current prices for Asian benchmark high-sulphur heavy fuel oil, which is used in power stations, shipping and elsewhere.

The steps for now do not involve the provision of 2,000 megawatts of electricity that South Korea pledged in a September 2005 deal reached by the six countries. That is reserved for after the completion of denuclearisation of North Korea.

The electricity, at an estimated cost of $8.55 billion over 10 years, would be about equal to North Korea's current output.

The Beijing talks had focussed on how to begin implementing a September 2005 accord that offered Pyongyang aid and security assurances in return for dismantling its weapons capabilities.

The United States would contribute to the infusion of oil and aid for North Korea, meaning that President George W. Bush must win Congressional approval for the deal, the New York Times reported.

North Korea stepped down the path to nuclear disarmament before, in a 1994 agreement with the Clinton administration that also promised aid.

But that Joint Framework agreement fell apart amid accusations of bad faith between Pyongyang and Washington, and the agreement collapsed in late 2002 after Washington accused North Korea of seeking to produce weapons-grade uranium.

A gulf of distrust divides the isolated North from others in the talks, especially the United States. Diplomats have stressed that even this new initial disarmament action could founder.

"This is a first step," Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Aso told U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in a telephone call, Kyodo reported. "Whether it actually goes ahead remains to be seen. We do not know whether it will go ahead just because it has been signed."

(Additional reporting by Ben Blanchard, Nick Macfie, Lindsay Beck, Ian Ransom and Teruaki Ueno in Beijing)
:shock: ok checking the date, no it isnt april 1st... so Kim ll-sung has turned over a new leaf... now all he needs to do is sort out the human right in his country, in the form of having them... and he will be eligible for a international hug form the UN... :thumleft:
 
#5
You mean we're not going to bomb the shit out of them?

I don't understand. It's worked so well in the past. Surely aggressive, militaristic unilateralism is the way forward?!

Someone give me one - just one - example of where this hasn't worked in the past. :p
 
#6
PartTimePongo said:
Can I just say I rest my case here Artemis?
If the suggestion is that NK faked a nuclear test in order to engineer foreign aid - and you'd have to give them a certain amount of grudging admiration for having the balls to do that - you've got to ask how they faked results like the following:

Associated Press said:
An air sampling taken after North Korea's claimed nuclear test detected radioactivity consistent with an atomic explosion
Link here

I'm happy to be convinced otherwise, but it looks relatively conclusive from here.
 
#7
Does it?

The explosion and resultant radioactive sampling were so small, the conclusion was that the test either failed, or was a conventional/nuclear mix.

Various estimates place the yield at between 100-800 tonnes of TNT equivalent, and the small adioative samples taken , suggest either a squib or a mix.

As I pointed out , neighbouring countries haven't been screaming the house down, and the PRA would have it's boots up in the Pyongyang Hilton if they thought NK was seriously Nuclear capable.

Young Kim the nutter went to desperate means to get talks started again.

I wouldn't recommend Iran tries it though
 
#8
PartTimePongo said:
Does it?

The explosion and resultant radioactive sampling were so small, the conclusion was that the test either failed, or was a conventional/nuclear mix.

Various estimates place the yield at between 100-800 tonnes of TNT equivalent, and the small adioative samples taken , suggest either a squib or a mix.

As I pointed out , neighbouring countries haven't been screaming the house down, and the PRA would have it's boots up in the Pyongyang Hilton if they thought NK was seriously Nuclear capable.

Young Kim the nutter went to desperate means to get talks started again.

I wouldn't recommend Iran tries it though
I stand corrected :D

If Iran tried it, I imagine there'd be a large, Iran-shaped piece of molten glass adorning the Middle East...
 
#9
_Artemis_ said:
PartTimePongo said:
Does it?

The explosion and resultant radioactive sampling were so small, the conclusion was that the test either failed, or was a conventional/nuclear mix.

Various estimates place the yield at between 100-800 tonnes of TNT equivalent, and the small adioative samples taken , suggest either a squib or a mix.

As I pointed out , neighbouring countries haven't been screaming the house down, and the PRA would have it's boots up in the Pyongyang Hilton if they thought NK was seriously Nuclear capable.

Young Kim the nutter went to desperate means to get talks started again.

I wouldn't recommend Iran tries it though
I stand corrected :D

If Iran tried it, I imagine there'd be a large, Iran-shaped piece of molten glass adorning the Middle East...
or maybe iran 51st state of the USA...we probs have another iraq war situation on our hands... but this time the WMD's will be real... well... :roll: you dont know what to belive when it come out of 'said' leaders these days...
 
#10
predatorplus said:
or maybe iran 51st state of the USA...we probs have another iraq war situation on our hands... but this time the WMD's will be real... well... :roll: you dont know what to belive when it come out of 'said' leaders these days...
Ack, if they'd got a nuke by now they'd have been shouting from the rooftops about it - remember that bizarre press conference when they'd managed to refine a small amount of nuclear material?

Iran as the 51st state? Thought that was us...
 
#11
Pretty ballsy work by the gimp in the platform shoes. It certainly shows the value of playing a bad hand well.

Mind you it probably helps to have a nuclear-armed sponsor with enormous economic clout. I wonder what what Ahmedinijad will say about ths one.
 
#12
Maybe my constant bleating about leaving Bliar's Broken Britain and going to live somewhere pleasant like Zimbabwe, Yemen or North Korea might now be a starter.
 

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