My Sort of Hovis

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
See how complicated it is...theres weighing and measuring, ingredients, right orders, programmes and button pressing. Then if thers no fire and the thing comes out, theres cutting to be done. Much easier to buy a loaf for 20p or whatever it is these days.

20p? Get the timing right at local supermarket and you can get 20loaves for that!
 
20p? Get the timing right at local supermarket and you can get 20loaves for that!
True. There's a bakery near me which gets rid of the last of the day's product for 40p per loaf after 4pm (1600hrs...) and it's at its peak of bready deliciousness for the next couple of hours. Costs a couple of quid to get there, though, so must be mitigated by a visit to the pub for some IPA. Yeast; the principal food group.

Edit: Here! Since when has any dentist needed to hunt out the cheap deals?
 
The charming and diverse* immigrants stake out all the giveaway food round my way, they're like locusts, I swear some of them have extra arms, two to push you out of the way, and two to grab rations with.





* not my first choice of wording.
 
Don't listen to Wagner while baking Bagels.

Gas and ovens ect.
Absolute rubbish. Overture to the Meistersinger absolutely brilliant, Die Walkuere ideal for the Hoovering-gets you into a lovely rhythm, Tristan and Isolde for that time you want to get the woman into bed-meal and candles and all soppy. Gas and Ovens indeed!!! Besides I bake fruit cakes not Bagels.
 
You've never tried American bread then! Its like a fine sponge mattress foam.

I have. It's one of the reasons I've never made a habit of visiting the states frequently. :p

The fact a former housemate of mine went full religious zealot and lives there might also be a factor. The USA might be a huge place but with my luck the bastard would still find me. :p

I might give the bread recipe a shot though. Molasses is ace to play with.
 
I used to use a bread maker, but binned it in favor of mixing the dough in the stand mixer and baking it in the oven because:

1. It made oddly shaped loaves, and had the paddle hole in the bottom. Part of the attraction of food is its appearance.
2. Loaves were usually too small - the mixer bowl is farking huge.
3. Most of the recipes I liked required using the bread maker just to knead the dough. To be honest, it was a bit crap at it.
4. The programs on the bread maker were quite inflexible. You didn't get to choose the temperature or baking time.
5. It doesn't make baguettes. Nor does it use ventilated baking tins. Or round ones.
6. If one looks in a professional kitchen, you don't find a bread maker, you find a BFO dough mixer.

Basically I outgrew it.

On another note, I'm with Effendi; American bread is arse. Although the "wheat bread" varieties are much better than the white ones.

However, technically UK bread is arse too, having done some reading up on it when the bread maker wasn't up to snuff. After WW2, UK had a huge population and baby boom to feed, and insufficiently strong wheat/flour to make decent bread. The MAFF (or its predecessor) set about inventing an industrial process to make sufficient bread within the low quality of the wheat available. Hence the Chorleywood process came about in the 60s. Nearly all bread mass-produced in the UK uses this process today, and hence it all tastes quite similar. It's hard to replicate at home; you need a steam oven, and they aren't exactly thick on the ground. They are available, but it'll be a few years yet for me, if ever.

I don't know if you can get the additives in the UK, but in the US, you can buy wheat germ, corn meal, citric acid for bakers etc quite readily. They let you vary the dough type and the meal stops the thing sticking to the pan if you have a soft sticky dough, which some recipes call for. I also RTFMed for once, and keep the yeast in the fridge once opened.

All the above aside, I've quit making bread for a while, since I decided to lose a few pounds, and lay off the bread!
 
I used to use a bread maker, but binned it in favor of mixing the dough in the stand mixer and baking it in the oven because:

1. It made oddly shaped loaves, and had the paddle hole in the bottom. Part of the attraction of food is its appearance.
2. Loaves were usually too small - the mixer bowl is farking huge.
3. Most of the recipes I liked required using the bread maker just to knead the dough. To be honest, it was a bit crap at it.
4. The programs on the bread maker were quite inflexible. You didn't get to choose the temperature or baking time.
5. It doesn't make baguettes. Nor does it use ventilated baking tins. Or round ones.
6. If one looks in a professional kitchen, you don't find a bread maker, you find a BFO dough mixer.

Basically I outgrew it.

On another note, I'm with Effendi; American bread is arse. Although the "wheat bread" varieties are much better than the white ones.

However, technically UK bread is arse too, having done some reading up on it when the bread maker wasn't up to snuff. After WW2, UK had a huge population and baby boom to feed, and insufficiently strong wheat/flour to make decent bread. The MAFF (or its predecessor) set about inventing an industrial process to make sufficient bread within the low quality of the wheat available. Hence the Chorleywood process came about in the 60s. Nearly all bread mass-produced in the UK uses this process today, and hence it all tastes quite similar. It's hard to replicate at home; you need a steam oven, and they aren't exactly thick on the ground. They are available, but it'll be a few years yet for me, if ever.

I don't know if you can get the additives in the UK, but in the US, you can buy wheat germ, corn meal, citric acid for bakers etc quite readily. They let you vary the dough type and the meal stops the thing sticking to the pan if you have a soft sticky dough, which some recipes call for. I also RTFMed for once, and keep the yeast in the fridge once opened.

All the above aside, I've quit making bread for a while, since I decided to lose a few pounds, and lay off the bread!

Ours has about 17 settings on it, I tend to use the dough option and let it mix, once the mixing is completed I quickly remove the pan, pop the dough out and remove the paddle. Dough back in for 50 minutes fermenting and on baking for 40 minutes. You can use the machine to do the mixing for you, pop the dough out and make whatever you fancy. The loaves it makes are taller than they are long but quite frankly that doesn't bother me in the slightest.

I just made this today with the machine.
 

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I have still never found the answer to why home made bread which is free of preservatives lasts for ever but shop bread pumped full of preservatives goes mouldy pretty quickly. Seems a bit counterintuitive.

I've yet to see any of the bread I make go off, a have started to go a bit stale towards the end pieces but they are perfectly fine for dipping in casseroles. Since I've perfected a half and half white/wholemeal loaf it has not even started to go stale after a week.
 
That is one of the more restrained loaves I have made! I forgot to go down and check on it for about an hour the previous week and the damn thing was trying to escape from the machine.
 
Wish I had that problem. My machine is getting on a bit and I think the element is dodgy. The results can be variable, to say the least. Time for a think about whether I can be bothered to spend all that time in the kitchen just for massaging the makings of a loaf.
 
Wish I had that problem. My machine is getting on a bit and I think the element is dodgy. The results can be variable, to say the least. Time for a think about whether I can be bothered to spend all that time in the kitchen just for massaging the makings of a loaf.

Having had the breadmaker for a few months I still find I like building loaves by hand. I think my next local purchase item is going to be a BFO mixer with a dough hook.....not so much for the bread, I have been getting requests for brioche and the dough for that can get messy.

I tend to knockout a weekly 'hovis' loaf and I have some small breadroll size tins that I make Hovis rolls in. I use the breadmaker to make a white loaf weekly for decent toasing bread.
 
Having had the breadmaker for a few months I still find I like building loaves by hand. I think my next local purchase item is going to be a BFO mixer with a dough hook.....not so much for the bread, I have been getting requests for brioche and the dough for that can get messy.

I tend to knockout a weekly 'hovis' loaf and I have some small breadroll size tins that I make Hovis rolls in. I use the breadmaker to make a white loaf weekly for decent toasing bread.
Just bought the wife a mixer and , funnily enough a new kitchen, being installed soon. Once that's done there'll be no stopping us.
 
Just bought the wife a mixer and , funnily enough a new kitchen, being installed soon. Once that's done there'll be no stopping us.

Oooooh, kitchen......s'pensive.

You putting it in, or have you got a fitter? I like doing the kitchens when I am fixing up a house, always buy from Ikea, robust, adaptable and stylish if you add a few non-Ikea accent components. The Ikea bloke told me in the US that for fitting you basically add on what everything else cost to buy.

I like working bun's, it's relaxing.
 
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