My recent trip to Dublin, a few thoughts

par avion

War Hero
No exactly there was about 200'000 who couldn't make the GPO get together as they were prior engaged in Northern France/Southern Belgium.
Including Emmet Dalton who was awarded the MC and John Redmond from the 16th Irish Division whose contribution was written out of history for many years. Any way the Dublin gig kicked off a couple of months before the Somme gig. The 36th and the 16th would have been sharpening their bayonets getting ready for the big show.

Anyway where do you get the figure of 200'000 from ? Not disputing it but it seems a little high considering the strengh of each division would have been about 20'000, although I am aware there were Irishmen in other units.
 
Including Emmet Dalton who was awarded the MC and John Redmond from the 16th Irish Division whose contribution was written out of history for many years. Any way the Dublin gig kicked off a couple of months before the Somme gig. The 36th and the 16th would have been sharpening their bayonets getting ready for the big show.

Anyway where do you get the figure of 200'000 from ? Not disputing it but it seems a little high considering the strengh of each division would have been about 20'000, although I am aware there were Irishmen in other units.
It's reported that upwards of 210,000 volunteers, came from these shores, before replacements from GB were required to replace massive battlefield losses in early 1918, to bring the 10th,16th and the 36th Divisions back upto full strength.

 

par avion

War Hero
It's reported that upwards of 210,000 volunteers, came from these shores, before replacements from GB were required to replace massive battlefield losses in early 1918, to bring the 10th,16th and the 36th Divisions back upto full strength.

Didn't the 10th Division serve in the Galipoli and the middle east against Johnny Turk. I know that there casaulties, although high were a lot lower that the 16th and 36th on the Western front.
 
Didn't the 10th Division serve in the Galipoli and the middle east against Johnny Turk. I know that there casaulties, although high were a lot lower that the 16th and 36th on the Western front.
The casualty estimates for each of the three Irish Divisions during WW1 were:
36th Ulster 32,000 KIA, wounded or missing
16th Irish 27,000 KIA, wounded or missing
10th Irish 9,000 KIA, wounded or missing
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
No exactly there was about 200'000 who couldn't make the GPO get together as they were prior engaged in Northern France/Southern Belgium and the Mediterranean.
Surely the two Divisions. the 10th and the 16th would not amount to 200.000, I would take it the 36th div would not have participated anyway?
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
I was taking a ride around Dublin on one of the 'Big Red Buses' when I saw a sign on a red brick building ' Ireland in the Great War' I jumped off and went in... Great! I will see something of the 'Dublins' the Munsters' Connoughts etc! Not a bit of it. It was pure propaganda of how Irish lives were squandered. There were no military items or artifacts. There were letters from the front; one enlarged to door size stating: 'Our English officers are trying to kill us off, surely they are.' I spoke to the curator and mentioned that the exhibition seemed to miss the point and that it was anti British; He glared at me and remarked "Can you blame them!" I asked where was the fine history of the fine old Irish Regiments going back to the 17th Cent and whos Colours lie in State in Windsor Castle. He got really angry and replied "They are nothing to do with Ireland they are British Regiments! We didn't part on good terms! The whole thing seemed a waste of Irish money, and that they may have had the wrong man in the wrong council job!
 
Surely the two Divisions. the 10th and the 16th would not amount to 200.000, I would take it the 36th div would not have participated anyway?
It was a tongue in cheek comment.

There was 60'000 Irish soldiers called up, at the start of WW1 alone from what I've read, from the full time and reserve.

I went to a local service just before Remembrance Sunday, conducted by the 36th Ulster Memorial Association. There was a talk about the forgotten Ulster Volunteers who never joined the 36th Ulster Division. The UVF supposedly supplied the Royal Navy with their mobile machine gun personnel, including vehicles, for service in the Eastern Front.

From wiki.
"Irishmen also enlisted in other Irish regiments of the regular British army based elsewhere in England, Scotland and Wales (some Irish in name only). These included four regular cavalry regiments (the 4th (Royal Irish) Dragoon Guards, the 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, the 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons, and the 8th (King's Royal Irish) Hussars), a regular infantry regiment (the Irish Guards), two cavalry regiments of the Special Reserve (the North Irish Horse and the South Irish Horse), two units of the Territorial Force (the Liverpool Irish and the London Irish Rifles) and the war-raised Tyneside Irish Brigade of Kitchener's Army."
 
I was taking a ride around Dublin on one of the 'Big Red Buses' when I saw a sign on a red brick building ' Ireland in the Great War' I jumped off and went in... Great! I will see something of the 'Dublins' the Munsters' Connoughts etc! Not a bit of it. It was pure propaganda of how Irish lives were squandered. There were no military items or artifacts. There were letters from the front; one enlarged to door size stating: 'Our English officers are trying to kill us off, surely they are.' I spoke to the curator and mentioned that the exhibition seemed to miss the point and that it was anti British; He glared at me and remarked "Can you blame them!" I asked where was the fine history of the fine old Irish Regiments going back to the 17th Cent and whos Colours lie in State in Windsor Castle. He got really angry and replied "They are nothing to do with Ireland they are British Regiments! We didn't part on good terms! The whole thing seemed a waste of Irish money, and that they may have had the wrong man in the wrong council job!
The National War Memorial Gardens at Islandbridge, has 4 large bookrooms dedicated to each of the 3 Irish Divisions, The 4th bookroom, if I remember right was for those who served in WW2.

There's some artifacts in each bookroom, including the register of death's from Saint Annes cathedral in Belfast, which names everyone from the 36th Ulster Division, who fell in France and Belgium.

The original Ginchy Cross is located in the bookroom, dedicated to the 16th Irish Division.
@irlsgt might have a bit more info, on what artifacts are held onsight.
 
The National War Memorial Gardens at Islandbridge, has 4 large bookrooms dedicated to each of the 3 Irish Divisions, The 4th bookroom, if I remember right was for those who served in WW2.

There's some artifacts in each bookroom, including the register of death's from Saint Annes cathedral in Belfast, which names everyone from the 36th Ulster Division, who fell in France and Belgium.

The original Ginchy Cross is located in the bookroom, dedicated to the 16th Irish Division.
@irlsgt might have a bit more info, on what artifacts are held onsight.
I was at the 100th anniversary Of the Somme was my first time there. Unfortunately didn’t get to the book rooms.

it’s a beautiful place and very well done
 
I really enjoy Dublin, I like the people, the pubs and the singing in the good ones, Restaurants are good, however their politics of days gone by are 'one sided' On a tour of Kilmainham Jail they only mention executions by the British. Against a wall in the prison (I saw not one bullet strike at that position) where they still have the execution chair situated. No mention of the many Irish citizens executed by their own people at Kilmainham during the Civil war on partition 1921/22. I think the numbers executed on that occasion outnumbered those executed by the British over time. Perhaps Isgt will confirm?

The other thing that is apparent is the splendid Georgian buildings, that fact left Dublin a lovely legacy, also the fact that the city has never been bombed from the air, thus many fine buildings remain.
Just to add to what I said earlier.

you really have to remember that the War of Independence and Civil War were in living memory probably up until 30/35 years ago.

and whatever about the War of Independence, the Civil War was short but extremely intense. You had members of the same family (eg brothers) and best friends taking up arms against each other

even today not much is said about the Civil War. The PIRA as is today was really born in 1922. Remembering the period 1922/23 is going to be a very hard part of our “decade of centenaries”.
 
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I was taking a ride around Dublin on one of the 'Big Red Buses' when I saw a sign on a red brick building ' Ireland in the Great War' I jumped off and went in... Great! I will see something of the 'Dublins' the Munsters' Connoughts etc! Not a bit of it. It was pure propaganda of how Irish lives were squandered. There were no military items or artifacts. There were letters from the front; one enlarged to door size stating: 'Our English officers are trying to kill us off, surely they are.' I spoke to the curator and mentioned that the exhibition seemed to miss the point and that it was anti British; He glared at me and remarked "Can you blame them!" I asked where was the fine history of the fine old Irish Regiments going back to the 17th Cent and whos Colours lie in State in Windsor Castle. He got really angry and replied "They are nothing to do with Ireland they are British Regiments! We didn't part on good terms! The whole thing seemed a waste of Irish money, and that they may have had the wrong man in the wrong council job!
Try the National Museum Collins Bks

He is right though there is zero lineage between any British unit (eg the Dublin’s) and any Irish unit since 1922
 
I was taking a ride around Dublin on one of the 'Big Red Buses' when I saw a sign on a red brick building ' Ireland in the Great War' I jumped off and went in... Great! I will see something of the 'Dublins' the Munsters' Connoughts etc! Not a bit of it. It was pure propaganda of how Irish lives were squandered. There were no military items or artifacts. There were letters from the front; one enlarged to door size stating: 'Our English officers are trying to kill us off, surely they are.' I spoke to the curator and mentioned that the exhibition seemed to miss the point and that it was anti British; He glared at me and remarked "Can you blame them!" I asked where was the fine history of the fine old Irish Regiments going back to the 17th Cent and whos Colours lie in State in Windsor Castle. He got really angry and replied "They are nothing to do with Ireland they are British Regiments! We didn't part on good terms! The whole thing seemed a waste of Irish money, and that they may have had the wrong man in the wrong council job!
where was that?
 
I was at the 100th anniversary Of the Somme was my first time there. Unfortunately didn’t get to the book rooms.

it’s a beautiful place and very well done
I think you have to book in advance to get inside the bookrooms..they're under lock and key.

When you say the 100th anniversary of the Somme, do you mean you were over at Thiepval or down in Dublin for the centenary?

I was over in Ypres for 6 nights in 2016 and was privileged to have been invited down to the Ulster Tower on the 100th anniversary of the Somme for the remembrance service. I literally felt like I was standing on hollowed ground, bathed in the blood of my forefathers, including my kids great-great-great Grandfather, who's remains are probably somewhere close to the Ulster Tower.
 
Indeed - they even speak with a distinct accent from the Irish.

Bloody Jackeens

My bold .. are you a "culchie" then?

I used to go to the RoI fairly regularly on business, I tried to organise my trips to coincide with Rugby international matches in Dublin. My hosts would normally supply me with tickets. One of the companies I dealt with was run by a former PM of Irelands son and we got on very well. I actually went to see one of Barry McGuigan's fights with him after a match when Wales beat Ireland as his father didn't want the ringside seats.
To make the day perfect we chatted up 2 attractive Nurses later at our hotel which was full of famous personalities in the boxing world!
 
Try the National Museum Collins Bks

He is right though there is zero lineage between any British unit (eg the Dublin’s) and any Irish unit since 1922
Glasnevin seems to have something of a WW1 exhibition.

Combined Irish regiments Association - CIRA a bit unfortunate


The Regiments (and the RIC) and the WW1 war dead are also commemorated at Westminster Cathedral (Not Westminster Abbey, the Roman Catholic one nearer to Victoria Station) Chapel of St Patrick and the Saints of Ireland - Westminster Cathedral. If I recall correctly there are also some very old Regimental Colours there as well.
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Try the National Museum Collins Bks

He is right though there is zero lineage between any British unit (eg the Dublin’s) and any Irish unit since 1922
He may be correct on that, but as Ireland was part of Great Britain until partition, Ireland's part in the war is experienced by those Irish regiments serving in the British army. Sounds like he needs a pretty basic history book to get a decent grounding.
 
There are many regional Irish accents. Most of us can identify which county a person is from by their accent. There isn't even one Dublin accent, or one Cork accent for that matter. @irlsgt can probably identify which area of Dublin city or county an individual comes from by accent.

As an added bonus we can identify Travellers by accent as well.
But many people in Tralee, Killarney, Castle Gregory, etc.can't tell a weedgie from a Belfast Accent for some reason.
 
He may be correct on that, but as Ireland was part of Great Britain until partition, Ireland's part in the war is experienced by those Irish regiments serving in the British army. Sounds like he needs a pretty basic history book to get a decent grounding.
With respect
Your applying your logic (which is based on your experience) to a completely different society, time and country.

if you were to ask most Irish people about Irish regiments in any army (there are many) you’d probably get a similar reaction.

the formation and contribution of the National Volunteers is covered in Irish schools.
 
I think you have to book in advance to get inside the bookrooms..they're under lock and key.

When you say the 100th anniversary of the Somme, do you mean you were over at Thiepval or down in Dublin for the centenary?

I was over in Ypres for 6 nights in 2016 and was privileged to have been invited down to the Ulster Tower on the 100th anniversary of the Somme for the remembrance service. I literally felt like I was standing on hollowed ground, bathed in the blood of my forefathers, including my kids great-great-great Grandfather, who's remains are probably somewhere close to the Ulster Tower.
Dublin
 
I seen earlier that the British Legion has an annual service of remembrance, in the Islandbridge gardens on the 11th July.

Is there any services, held down South for Passchendaele or Gallipoli etc?
 

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