My nipples are stuck.

@Cutaway Agreed, the one I have/had is a Kranks thing I think. So, enlighten me oh wise one, where to get a 'proper' one?
Find a Deep, 1/4 drive socket that just fits inside the recess and is fairly close on the nipple.. grind a slot in it using a 1mm thick cutting disc on the angle grinder.

Job jobbed.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Find a Deep, 1/4 drive socket that just fits inside the recess and is fairly close on the nipple.. grind a slot in it using a 1mm thick cutting disc on the angle grinder.

Job jobbed.
These days its diffferent slots I'm most interested in grinding.
 
Agree...

do not put heat anywhere near the working parts of a gun unless you really know what you are doing.. strictly speaking any "hot work", even soft soldering, puts a gun out of proof and it needs to be re-tested before being used again!
When I soft solder brass fingerguards on the hardened and tempered knife blades I make, I clamp the blade into a big vice as a heatsink, but I don't mind if the tang looses a bit of temper, so that it won't break as easily. So far it has worked.
 

Chicken

Old-Salt
Heat the cylinder up in the oven,on max temp for an hour.Take it out and drop it into a sink full of cold water and try again.Sometimes the shrink rates of the two parts differ and break the chemical weld jambing them.

Personally I would heat the nipples up to a dull red with a rose bud torch and do the cold water trick.It does work well with small parts.Expecting oil to ingress the threads after they are filled with Carbon is not going to happen.
 

Blogg

LE
Heat the cylinder up in the oven,on max temp for an hour.Take it out and drop it into a sink full of cold water and try again.Sometimes the shrink rates of the two parts differ and break the chemical weld jambing them.

Personally I would heat the nipples up to a dull red with a rose bud torch and do the cold water trick.It does work well with small parts.Expecting oil to ingress the threads after they are filled with Carbon is not going to happen.
Variation on that is to heat up cylinder in oven or less dramaticaly hot water/ Youngs mix then zap the nipples with the output from a gas duster.straw

The gas which come out is pretty cold and that can provide localised shrinkage
 

HE117

LE
Heat the cylinder up in the oven,on max temp for an hour.Take it out and drop it into a sink full of cold water and try again.Sometimes the shrink rates of the two parts differ and break the chemical weld jambing them.

Personally I would heat the nipples up to a dull red with a rose bud torch and do the cold water trick.It does work well with small parts.Expecting oil to ingress the threads after they are filled with Carbon is not going to happen.
I don't know if you're being serious with this post, but this is no way to deal with a firearm.. technically doing this amount of heat work will take it out of proof..

1. Although you are not taking the steel above its critical temperature in an oven, you are however well into the tempering range and doing what you suggest will affect the strength of the parts. You have NO IDEA what the cylinder is made of or what state it will be left in.

2, Percussion nipples are heat treated.. taking them to dull red will take it above its critical temperature and destroy the designed strength..

Gentle heat and steady pressure is all that is needed.. if this does not work, then hand the work over to a qualified gunsmith.

@Ravers... HELPPP (you don't half choose some prime times to have holes drilled in your bonce!)
 
I don't know if you're being serious with this post, but this is no way to deal with a firearm.. technically doing this amount of heat work will take it out of proof..

1. Although you are not taking the steel above its critical temperature in an oven, you are however well into the tempering range and doing what you suggest will affect the strength of the parts. You have NO IDEA what the cylinder is made of or what state it will be left in.

2, Percussion nipples are heat treated.. taking them to dull red will take it above its critical temperature and destroy the designed strength..

Gentle heat and steady pressure is all that is needed.. if this does not work, then hand the work over to a qualified gunsmith.

@Ravers... HELPPP (you don't half choose some prime times to have holes drilled in your bonce!)
If @Ravers has a hole tapped he could have a percussion nipple fitted to his noggin.

How is he in any case? What's the latest?
 
I don't know if you're being serious with this post, but this is no way to deal with a firearm.. technically doing this amount of heat work will take it out of proof..

1. Although you are not taking the steel above its critical temperature in an oven, you are however well into the tempering range and doing what you suggest will affect the strength of the parts. You have NO IDEA what the cylinder is made of or what state it will be left in.

2, Percussion nipples are heat treated.. taking them to dull red will take it above its critical temperature and destroy the designed strength..

Gentle heat and steady pressure is all that is needed.. if this does not work, then hand the work over to a qualified gunsmith.

@Ravers... HELPPP (you don't half choose some prime times to have holes drilled in your bonce!)
In general, I've often found it safe and effective with small and medium screws to tighten them slightly to free them off before undoing them. Sometimes work them back and forth until they free up enough to unscrew.
 

HE117

LE
If @Ravers has a hole tapped he could have a percussion nipple fitted to his noggin.

How is he in any case? What's the latest?
Nope.. NHS is metric, Percussion nipples are Whitworth (or Enfield)...

..dunno how he is - he is off cross country for a bit though!
 

Chicken

Old-Salt
I don't know if you're being serious with this post, but this is no way to deal with a firearm.. technically doing this amount of heat work will take it out of proof..

1. Although you are not taking the steel above its critical temperature in an oven, you are however well into the tempering range and doing what you suggest will affect the strength of the parts. You have NO IDEA what the cylinder is made of or what state it will be left in.

2, Percussion nipples are heat treated.. taking them to dull red will take it above its critical temperature and destroy the designed strength..

Gentle heat and steady pressure is all that is needed.. if this does not work, then hand the work over to a qualified gunsmith.

@Ravers... HELPPP (you don't half choose some prime times to have holes drilled in your bonce!)

220c won't take steel out of temper.Anymore than running an engine will damage the Cylinder head.

Heating the nipples up to red,removing and discarding them will have no effect.They are discarded.The surrounding cylinder wont have its temper effected as it will not be heated to the same degree as ii would be held in lead soft jaws in a big fukking vice.
 
I can only confirm what HE117 says about gentle heat and steady pressure, that's the safest way for sure and is how I've seen it done only very recently on a revolver with a stuck steel nipple.

I use the beryllium nipples and always coat the threads with Permatex ( A recommendation of Dave Corbin, the swage gear chappie) which is like copper slip and is usually used in exhaust systems as it stands heat well as does copper slip...it's just silver coloured.
 
220c won't take steel out of temper.Anymore than running an engine will damage the Cylinder head.

Heating the nipples up to red,removing and discarding them will have no effect.They are discarded.The surrounding cylinder wont have its temper effected as it will not be heated to the same degree as ii would be held in lead soft jaws in a big fukking vice.
First, I temper my knife blades at 200-220 degrees centigrade (hardening at 820 degrees centigrade, then quenching in oil), which gives them (polished before) a nice straw yellow colour. I use an infrared thermometre, which reads up to 950 degrees centigrade, fo this job.

I don't know at what temperature the cylinder of the gun has been tempered, but the warmer you go, the softer it will become.

Secondly, heating the nipples (male threads) won't help much. If you want to use heat, you'll have to heat the cylinder (nut, female threads), so that they will expand more than the male thread, to break the bond between the threads.Ideally you would cool the nipple to make it shrink (I know, not possible).

Another thing is that if you clamp the round cylinder into a normal vice, there will only be a small contact area to conduct the heat away. The risk is that the cylinder will get unevenly heated and might get distorted and also the temper might get changed unevenly.
You will also need some soft padding inside the vice's jaws to prevent damaging the cylinder, aluminium would be best, as it also conducts heat. Wood or some kind of plastic (e.g. Tuffnol) would not conduct the heat.
 
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@Walther see @EX_STAB post above (somewhere) about using 2 x pins in opposite chambers to clamp. Good idea! The cylinder is not clamped at all. They'll have to be as close to .44 as possible I'd imagine to avoid excess movement.
 
@Walther see @EX_STAB post above (somewhere) about using 2 x pins in opposite chambers to clamp. Good idea! The cylinder is not clamped at all. They'll have to be as close to .44 as possible I'd imagine to avoid excess movement.
Depending on the hardness of he pins compared to the cylinder metal, their tolerances as compared to the chamber I/D and the force used to break loose the nipples, they might damage the inner walls of the chambers.
 

HE117

LE
Depending on the hardness of he pins compared to the cylinder metal, their tolerances as compared to the chamber I/D and the force used to break loose the nipples, they might damage the inner walls of the chambers.
I have two brass pegs machined to sit in the cylinder bores.. they are then gripped in the vice and provide more than enough purchace.. I keep meaning to mill flats on them, but have never got round to it.. no marks on either the cylinders or the pegs..
 
I have two brass pegs machined to sit in the cylinder bores.. they are then gripped in the vice and provide more than enough purchace.. I keep meaning to mill flats on them, but have never got round to it.. no marks on either the cylinders or the pegs..
Of course, brass is softer than steel and with a close fit, there is enough surface area to spread the load.
 
Can't say I particularly bother taking nipples out - I use RWS caps and douse the thing in 50:50 ballistol-water after shooting.
 

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