My New Workshop Plans - Any advice?

I stored all of my power tools and wood working equipment under a solid wooden table, the whole thing being double-wrapped in a very, very large waterproof tarpaulin. I also bunged in 3 dehumidifying packs. The whole thing had to be left for almost 2 months due to Covid and bad weather. All came out nice and dry, no rust or corrosion seen when they were unwrapped.
 

Yokel

LE
I stored all of my power tools and wood working equipment under a solid wooden table, the whole thing being double-wrapped in a very, very large waterproof tarpaulin. I also bunged in 3 dehumidifying packs. The whole thing had to be left for almost 2 months due to Covid and bad weather. All came out nice and dry, no rust or corrosion seen when they were unwrapped.

What is the climate like where you are? Also you spent time preparing them for storage? Lubricating oil will dry out in the heat, condensation due to cold and humidity will cause corrosion and cause short circuits. I presume that you inspected them before use?

If you want to keep things ready to use, you at least need to keep them dry and warm. Think of the difference bwtween preparing a weapon for storage, and preparing it for use.
 
What is the climate like where you are? Also you spent time preparing them for storage? Lubricating oil will dry out in the heat, condensation due to cold and humidity will cause corrosion and cause short circuits. I presume that you inspected them before use?

If you want to keep things ready to use, you at least need to keep them dry and warm. Think of the difference bwtween preparing a weapon for storage, and preparing it for use.
North East coast of Scotland, so wet, windy and cold. I didn't prep in any way, as originally this was only planned for 7 days max. Most tools had been used very recently, so all working fine. The only thing I noticed was a little surface browning on my very old Tenon saw. I've used many of the power tools since then with no problems.
 
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theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I just had a look at the FILs sheds (he died in 2016 and I have not been there since).

The original sheds have spawned baby sheds:

View attachment 544876


A chap I know on the custom bike scene (an amazing engineer)has a garage that leads I to a shed that's was extended into another and so on. There is no rear garden any more. Last time I went round there he had two reciprocating saws, a couple of lathes, milling machine, stores area, two bikes under construction, welding bay...
All hidden under some brables and bushes growing on the "shed" roof, from above it looks like an overgrown garden
 

Yokel

LE
North East coast of Scotland, so wet, windy and cold. I didn't prep in any way, as originally this was only planned for 7 days max. Most tools had been used very recently, so sponsoring fine. The only thing I noticed was a little surface browning on my very old Tenon saw. I've used many of the power tools since then with no problems.

I thought you were in New Zealand?

Anyway - for me the key thing is the phrase 'since then' about power tools. Would you be happy to pick up a drill or a belt sander that felt frozen? That was my point.

Tools are expensive so look after them.

A chap I know on the custom bike scene (an amazing engineer)has a garage that leads I to a she'd that's was extended into another and so on. There is no rear garden any more. Last time I went round there he had two reciprocating saws, a couple of lathes, milling machine, stores area, two bikes under construction, welding bay...
All hidden under some brables and bushes growing on the "shed" roof, from above it looks like an overgrown garden

He is running a covert factory like they had in World War Two?
 
I thought you were in New Zealand?

Anyway - for me the key thing is the phrase 'since then' about power tools. Would you be happy to pick up a drill or a belt sander that felt frozen? That was my point.

Tools are expensive so look after them.



He is running a covert factory like they had in World War Two?
Frozen, as in -°C, then no.
 
I’ve just erected a workshop in my garden. Eight foot by twenty five foot long. Basically, I bought two sheds, one 10ft X 8ft and one 12ft x 8ft and connected them together. There was a three foot gap in the middle where we inserted a doorway, fitted a door in it filled in the remaining voids with a wall, roof and flooring which extended the entire length to twenty five foot long.

The shed timber cladding is feather edge. I went for this for two reasons. Firstly it was the initial cheapest option for the outside structure but still does the job. Secondly, in the summer later this year, I intend to renovate an old existing shed next to the new workshop into an extension and I’ll reclad that in shiplap or tongue and groove and at the same time, I’ll also reclad the new workshop in the same material which will add a further layer to the wall of the workshop.

The footing is concrete blocks laid on their sides in a shallow trench on a bed of muck to level them. The floor is 18mm OSB board with 18mm sheets of buffalo board laid on top. A substantial saving on a concrete base for that size at over a £100 per square metre for concrete and the OSB and buffalo board will feel better with the heating when it’s cold. The OSB floor was also in the price of the shed building.

the whole structure including all the walls and ceiling has been insulated with 25mm jabolite insulation sealed over on the interior with 18mm OSB board on the walls and 12mm OSB board on the ceiling. The 18mm on the walls is man enough to have shelving brackets screwed into it for shelving and the thinner 12mm was chosen for the ceiling to reduce the weight hanging off the ceiling. The 12mm is butted up over the top of the 18mm on the walls so the 18mm adds to the support.

The electrics are 60% there roughly. The power cable is running through a suitably hidden route through the house from the main to outside and armoured cable has been laid up the garden and into the new building into a heavy duty consumer unit. We have to decide where we want the sockets etc and where to run the ring for them. We also have all the lighting etc ready to be installed. We have all the materials. It’s the last thing left to do and then we can connect them to the mains in the house. That connection will be on a small consumer unit installed for that purpose on a separate set of tails from the meter.

I’ve also run internet cat7 outdoor cable from our indoor router out to the workshop as well.

I have to say that with the recent cold weather including frost and snow etc, the existing insulation work that we’ve done is performing well. We can heat the new building and the frost and the snow have remained in situ without melting which is testament to the fact that the heat is being kept in the building.

Overall, I’m happy with the whole thing. The electrics apart, a coat of preservative along the front and the jobs a good one for now. That said, I might add a sheet of perspex to the inside of the glass windows that are on one side of the twelve foot length to create a secondary barrier to stop heat escaping through the glass. All the other walls are timber with no glass in them.

My garden isn’t huge but it’s not tiny and we are within the permitted rules even with the old workshop being added on at a later date in the year. That’s an 8ft x 8ft structure which I’ll turn into into an 8ft x 12ft structure.

The last bit is that my garden does currently resemble a building site. With the levelling required resulting in a largish pile of earth and an older smaller shed that was previously on the site being dismantled and piled up waiting for disposal, a skip will be in order soon to smarten the place up.

What‘s it all about? Picture framing!

We now have the space to really get into it in a way that we never could before. It was really frustrating setting up for each part of the process and then taking it all down. We spent significantly more time setting up and dismantling tools and equipment than we did framing.

Now we will have a production line process with everything ready to go when we need it. I’m looking forward to getting on with it.
 
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theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
My 'sheffice' is a rather small summer house on a concrete base. Originally it was going to be our garden bar.
I ran power out to it, internet (cat 7 cable as I had some lying about) and it has light and heating from a oil filled radiator.
I recently lined the walls and ceiling with this


and I'm in the process of covering all of that with some old advertising boards salvaged from work when we were clearing out (saves 'em going in landfill) the difference the insulation makes is fantastic. The insulation may be cheap but it's really effective.

I'll be putting some better flooring down at some point with an underlay of some kind.
 

P.O.N.T.I

War Hero
I've just finished completing the build on a 4m X 3m 44mm thick logs log cabin from quick garden. Very pleased with the quality, and even uninsulated, feels warm with no heating at all. Double glazed, added extra silicone sealing at base and eaves, and went for metal roof option. Completely draught free and dry. Getting power installed next month, COVID allowing. Total cost, including concrete foundation, £3500

I would recommend using roofing mastic to seal the base, ie the point that the timber touche the concrete.
Many siicone are not going to cop and will lift and go brittle then peel.
Roofing mastic remains flexible.
 

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