My New Workshop Plans - Any advice?

I just had a look at the FILs sheds (he died in 2016 and I have not been there since).

The original sheds have spawned baby sheds:

Screenshot (35).png
 
I just had a look at the FILs sheds (he died in 2016 and I have not been there since).

The original sheds have spawned baby sheds:

View attachment 544876
We've a neighbour that did similar - the floor area of his sheds nearly match the bungalow they're joined to.

He left after being outed as a peado.

Got to watch those types...
 

Yokel

LE
What do you plan to do with your workshop? Is it purely for hobby/DIY use or will you be hoping to produce things to sell? I am just wondering if you might be better off avoiding construction costs and possible legal issues regarding planning permission and renting a small industrial unit?
 

4(T)

LE
I've got a similar project lined up - a workshop that will be about 8m x 4m (I hope).

It'll be built at one side of an unsurfaced rear yard, the ground being about 50cm of compacted road planings on top of ballast.

In my original deluxe "dream" I was going to build the shed on top of a poured concrete slab, however now it'll be more economic to build a series of finger footings - ie trenches the width of the building, with a concrete footing and then a low brick foundation on top incorporating the damp proof course. The same sort of things that hold up a suspended floor in an old house.

On top of the footings, I was intending to just scratch-build the whole thing myself out of C24 timber - 200mm floor joists, and more or less everything else out of 100mm/2x4. I'm going to infill the 100mm wall framing with celotex, and then clad them with whatever - ply inside, something suitably rustic outside.

I'll probably have a single pitch roof, just to keep things simple.

For windows I've got a load of double-glazed panels that were salvaged when I had new windows put in the house. They are all 50-60cm wide, so I'll just space the wall 2x4 accordingly.

Door will be one of the double steel units as seen on eBay. These are quite good for the money - I two single versions already, a multipoint locking front door, and another internally sealing off my, ahem, office.

Separate consumer unit. A zillion LED spots and 13A sockets.



I've just got to get around to actually doing it...
 
Consider oak framed, much of the speed of a prefab but the longevity of hardwood rather than softwood.
I've also seen a few garages/outbuildings built in the style of an oak frame but where the actual structure was steel like a farm building.

I would say that steel (particularly roofs) and to a lesser extent concrete pre-fabs always seem cold, dank and drippy with condensation although I gather you can mitigate this by having steel sheets with insulation bonded to them.
I don't think timber cladding (lap-board or t&g outer and ply inner with insulation between the two) is all that bad provided that the outer layer is good quality and the frame itself is solid i.e. steel or hardwood. It seems to me that with a lot of leaky wooden sheds the problem isn't that the cladding has failed but the crappy softwood frame has started to break down and shift. I know several people with quite old wood-clad stables that are still on their original larch ship-lap - and one of those has a softwood frame, albeit seasoned, creosoted, slow-grown Scandinavian softwood rather than the cut-today, shed tomorrow shite that's common these days.

Oh, and don't forget natural light, my brother did when he built a new farm workshop and then grumbled that he had to have the lights on even in the summer.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
You could lay a slab then build a dwarf wall with DPC, then fit timbers onto that, and construct a sound timber frame with bracing and then clad it with ridged metal roofing sheets, using the screws with caps, you oculd also clad the roof in the same material or use Coroling, I usually put a layer of Ply on first, treat it then put the Coroline on top of that, creates a good thermal barrier, plus insulation sheets below
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
What do you plan to do with your workshop? Is it purely for hobby/DIY use or will you be hoping to produce things to sell? I am just wondering if you might be better off avoiding construction costs and possible legal issues regarding planning permission and renting a small industrial unit?

It will be classed as an 'Art Studio/Workshop' as that covers the 'Industrial/Commercial Use' pitfall. Again, I've checked the regulations.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Containers are not going to work. The access to the back of my property is not good enough to get a container in, and the size of crane needed would be costly and require LA Authority approval as I live in a cul-de-sac which is only wide enough (with parked cars) for a single vehicle. The bin-men struggle to get up the road, and if ever a Fire Appliance needs to come up they use one of their guys as a spotter on foot.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
A Bunker.... Hmmmm....
 
A Bunker.... Hmmmm....
There’s one not that far from yours..
you could insulate your current workshop with fire foam then put a outer wall up with sarkin, wriggly tin roof all possible over a dry weekend. I know its doable i assisted my dad 25 years ago.
 
Insulation/ damp proofing is key is its cold and damp everything will deteriorate and you wont want to spend anytime in it , build it as if you have to live in it with so heating as well , handy if you get chucked out the house.
 
First off..... do not skimp on the base, get some good insulated concrete down.
Preparation is everything.

Once done, give these people a call.
I have had three of their garages.

I've just finished completing the build on a 4m X 3m 44mm thick logs log cabin from quick garden. Very pleased with the quality, and even uninsulated, feels warm with no heating at all. Double glazed, added extra silicone sealing at base and eaves, and went for metal roof option. Completely draught free and dry. Getting power installed next month, COVID allowing. Total cost, including concrete foundation, £3500
 
Cement floor as suggested
2 x 4 treated frame
Waterproof strip between bottom plate and the floor
6mm cement board outer skin
12mm construction ply inner skin (put insulation like how you're so close to Rekyavic)
Wriggly tin roof
Wiring through surface mounted conduit
Twin tube fluorescent light fittings
Fire extinguisher

From the cement pad up, two days work for two blokes
 
Also, yellow furniture wax on bare steel is great for preserving machine surfaces and handtools. Rub it in and you hardly notice it's there. On a saw table, give it a dry wipe before use.
 

Mufulira42

Old-Salt
Double skinned "log cabins" can be an alternative, built from treated 2x4s that slot together. Often used for classrooms, workshops or garden offices/rooms. Would suit your needs well, judging by the size and feel warmer. I've always found even insulated metal sheds to be cold and clammy.

Have squint on here

Must make space for a fridge as well as tools well spaced apart on work bench -- wired for sound and intenet porn channel ARRSE channel
 
I'm after advice on building my new workshop.

I have decided that my current workshop has reached the end of it's life. It's a wooden building, little more than a large shed. Uninsulated, made with poor quality wood and leaking from all angles. Clearly, when you have very expensive tools and machinery that don't take kindly to rust, this is less than ideal.

The plan, then, is to have it replaced. I have read up on the local planning laws and I understand what I can and cannot do, where I can and cannot place it etc.

I am looking at a 5.5M x 4M building, with the eaves at around 2.5M and total height at no more than 3.5M, double exterior door with windows inset at one end, no other windows. Electricity is an easy transfer from the line already installed, and there will be no plumbing.

I am currently looking at an insulated metal building with a raised concrete foundation, but am I going the right way? Building with brick and mortar would be the ideal, but the time needed to build it would be a concern. During the time between tearing down the old 'shed' and being able to move into the new building my machines would need to be under a tarp in the garden and my dining room would be full of my hand tools.

Can anyone give advice on what I should be looking at? Alternatives? Any help at all.
Portakabin, they come in many sizes, insulated, and fitted out with electrics, and BT sockets if required. They are used on building sites, for offices, stores and minor works workshops. Lowered into place by crane, or straight off the back of a low loader if access is available. Contact supplier, they will fit out to your requirements as needed.
 
I'm after advice on building my new workshop.

I have decided that my current workshop has reached the end of it's life. It's a wooden building, little more than a large shed. Uninsulated, made with poor quality wood and leaking from all angles. Clearly, when you have very expensive tools and machinery that don't take kindly to rust, this is less than ideal.

The plan, then, is to have it replaced. I have read up on the local planning laws and I understand what I can and cannot do, where I can and cannot place it etc.

I am looking at a 5.5M x 4M building, with the eaves at around 2.5M and total height at no more than 3.5M, double exterior door with windows inset at one end, no other windows. Electricity is an easy transfer from the line already installed, and there will be no plumbing.

I am currently looking at an insulated metal building with a raised concrete foundation, but am I going the right way? Building with brick and mortar would be the ideal, but the time needed to build it would be a concern. During the time between tearing down the old 'shed' and being able to move into the new building my machines would need to be under a tarp in the garden and my dining room would be full of my hand tools.

Can anyone give advice on what I should be looking at? Alternatives? Any help at all.

Machinery left outside , even under tarps, can start to rapidly suffer unless you have a bunch of REME, RE, RS, Techs around 24/7 to oil it, rub it , warm it etc.
Decide what is too valuable to have to replace - and put it into climate regulated storage.

If you are RLC Colonel - forget the above ^
 

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