My Mum's chicken curry.

#61
Never use curry powder, curry paste or curry sauce when making curry and never use someone else's recipe. Get down to your local Asian sweety shop and get yourself a bag of: garam masala, cumin, turmeric, chilli powder (hot), ginger and coriander. You'll also need butter, onions, garlic and tomatoes, a splash of good vinegar and some decent stock. Start with a tea spoonful of each spice fried up with the onions and garlic and see how it goes. Within a few sessions you'll hit the right combination - think of it as the culinary equivalent of messing around in boats.
Because you're a grade "A" thundercunt I'm going to top trump you. Never buy pre mixed garam masala, make your own. Always buy spices whole and grind after toasting/dry frying. This gives a more intense flavour and whole spices last longer. You can dry fry and bung them in a pepper grinder if you use it frequently.

Fresh chilis, ginger, curry leaves, bay leaves and coriander are also the way ahead, giving more depth and layers.

Use ghee, which isn't quite butter, it's clarified butter so withstands higher temperatures better.

Recipes are a good way to learn, there's always something to learn, unless you're a grade "A" thundercunt of course. I was recently introduced to this channel by one of the posters on the cooking thread. He's tops, look for his stuff on youtube.

Curry Guy

None of which addresses @vvaannmmaann 's mum's curry because it isn't about curry, it's about shit loads more. Try carnation as I said, I know it's pants but it's that authentic 60's thing.
 
#62
#67
Wouldn't attempt to duplicate your mum's but I do similar curries.

Brown the chicken off, set aside.
Saute finely chopped onion til colouring.
Add spices (possibly fruit at this point too).

* (If you've sauteed in butter/sufficient oil and you add some Flour/ powdered spices then add some milk you'll possibly get something similar to a bechamel sauce type thing but it sounds odd - guessing your mum's recipe).

Either way. Reintroduce chicken and coat.
I add a bit of chicken stock, fresh garlic and ginger (or your diced apple/sultanas here).

Let it cool, add yoghurt.
If you add ground almond or coconut cream at this point, even if the yoghurt split, it recombines.*

*Don't use no fat/low fat yoghurt/cream etc - they always split.
 
#68
Chicken curry when I was younger went a bit like this: left-over chicken from Sunday dinner went into the pressure cooker. There was six for Sunday dinner so there wasn’t that much anyway.
After boiling, the carcass was picked clean. Onions were fried off and Sharwood’s curry powder added. Chicken was then put in with any left over veg (again, not much). Stock added, then sultanas and to bulk it, a tin of baked beans or tomatoes. Served with white rice.
My curries have got a bit more adventurous over the years, but occasionaly I still chuck in a handful of sultanas. Takes me right back.
 
#69
That's a bit more like it.

It seems that the cultural exchange with India in the kitchen wasn't all one way. When I was out there years ago, a lot of the curries that were served in some of the old fashioned family run hotels (often, no doubt, populated with heritable cooks and staff), some of the curries and kedgerees had a distinctively 'British' feel to them. The puddings were of the Victorian and Edwardian British type, many of which are now all but forgotten in their home country. You'd have to dig out an old Mrs Beeton's or something to find the recipe.
 
#70
It probably tastes perfectly OK, at least as good as the average all-in.

Curried baked beans: fry a shallot or small onion in oil, add a tin of beans with chilli powder or sauce to taste, a teaspoon of garam masala, half a teaspoon of turmeric and a slack handful of sultans. Simmer for a few minutes.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#71
1982, this book changed home made curries like no other ever did.

madhur-jaffrey-indian-cookbook-700x465.jpg
 
#72
I nearly ended up as the Dasheera ceremonial bull ,after my first attempt at a ghurka curry in BMH singapore, silly question was where is the curry powdero_O,a bit embarrassing as the new 2i/c hospital Kitchen!!
 
#75
Noticed this article references
'Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors' by Lizzie Collingham.
Worth a read both for history and information - curry restaurants and TV chefs are the worst for pedalling myths - and from what I've experienced of native curry cuisine it's nothing like what we see.

Traditional meat for vindaloo?* - pork or duck.
(* Origins are Portuguese btw)
And my mum used to make curried potatoes in some weird way that's probably similar to OPs but way before I saw any aloo dishes in curry places.
 
#76
Traditional meat for vindaloo?* - pork or duck.
(* Origins are Portuguese btw)
I think that it was quite heavy on the vinegar, as well.

It seems to me that curry restaurant vindaloos are just an opportunity to bulk out out a dish with spuds but charge you the same as if it was all meat.
 
#77
I don’t remember Sharwoods from the sixties and seventies.

The curry powder of choice was Vencatachellums. IIRC the blue tin was hot and the pink tin was mild.

Leftover meat, onions, stock cube, curry powder. Served with long grain rice and a divided dish with coconut, apple, chutney/pickle, almonds etc.

Fackin horrible.

@Fang_Farrier was correct. That Madhur Jaffrey book and the TV series put paid to all that crap. As did Ken Hom with his book/series on Chinese food.
 
#78
I don’t remember Sharwoods from the sixties and seventies.

The curry powder of choice was Vencatachellums. IIRC the blue tin was hot and the pink tin was mild.

Leftover meat, onions, stock cube, curry powder. Served with long grain rice and a divided dish with coconut, apple, chutney/pickle, almonds etc.

Fackin horrible.

@Fang_Farrier was correct. That Madhur Jaffrey book and the TV series put paid to all that crap. As did Ken Hom with his book/series on Chinese food.
I quite liked home made 'British' curries (made with Bolst's or Vencat curry powder in our case). They could be quite tasty. I suppose it depended on the cook. The mistake is to compare the two styles. They weren't really the same thing at all. I could enjoy both. I don't think that a lot of curry restaurant curries can claim much more authenticity than 'Mum's' curries. Probably less so now than ever before.

As for Ken Hom, it seems that some of his lessons could usefully be learned by the majority of Chinese 'cooks' operating on our high streets. Much of it is ready-made stuff purchased in bulk from Chinese cash & carries and thrown around in a wok for a few minutes. Not at all good.
 
#79
Traditional meat for vindaloo?* - pork or duck.
(* Origins are Portuguese btw)
Madeira to be exact. You can still buy the original, vinegar-containing, pork stew in Funchal.

The mistake is to compare the two styles. They weren't really the same thing at all. I could enjoy both. I don't think that a lot of curry restaurant curries can claim much more authenticity than 'Mum's' curries.
I think most countries have a similar take on their favourite foreign food - never eat Chinese in India or Italian in Japan.
 
#80
Never use curry powder, curry paste or curry sauce when making curry and never use someone else's recipe. Get down to your local Asian sweety shop and get yourself a bag of: garam masala, cumin, turmeric, chilli powder (hot), ginger and coriander. You'll also need butter, onions, garlic and tomatoes, a splash of good vinegar and some decent stock. Start with a tea spoonful of each spice fried up with the onions and garlic and see how it goes. Within a few sessions you'll hit the right combination - think of it as the culinary equivalent of messing around in boats.
That's the way to do it.
By way of variation, the juice of a Lime ( Roll it on a hard surface to loosen it all up, before you cut it in half and squeeze it in) then turn the heat down and stir in half a pot of Greek Honey Yoghurt.

You can bless me after you've tasted it
 
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