My Mum's chicken curry.

#41
I think the OP means a proper 1970's British curry, long before anyone knew what a cardamon pod was , curry power came in two varieties , bland , and extra bland. It was made with left over chicken off the Sunday roast, or beef mince, and served with long grain rice, pudding rice if you were at her majesties pleasure. A vital ingredient was sultanas.

Posh people had a jar of Sharwoods mango chutney, but the rest of us had sliced bannana , and salted peanuts on it.

Naan bread was a loaf belonging to your parents mother, and Bombay potatoes was a medical condition caused by wearing shorts above the knee.
 
#42
Now I realise that means nothing to you lot.However you may still be able to help. She's dead now so asking her is tricky.Never wrote a recipe down, just remembered everything.
It was never too hot, but had chicken, curry powder, apples, sultans, onion, spices etc. Now at some point I'm sure milk was added and this transformed the dry ingredients into a lovely dark yellowy creamy consistency.
I've tried to repeat the recipe several times, but it's just not right. The chicken goes stringy, the 'sauce' splits... It's edible, but just not them same.
Any thoughts?
I hate sultanas in food!
 
#43
Naan bread was a loaf belonging to your parents mother, and Bombay potatoes was a medical condition caused by wearing shorts above the knee.
I'm old enough to remember a time when naan was a rarity even in Indian restaurants, for it required the use of a tandoor clay oven, which were quite late to appear on the restaurant scene. Tandoori dishes were seldom seen, as everything was prepared on a kitchen hob and breads consisted almost solely of chapati, which are cooked on a griddle.
 
#44
I think the OP means a proper 1970's British curry, long before anyone knew what a cardamon pod was , curry power came in two varieties , bland , and extra bland.
Hence my banging on about Yeungs. It’s as close to that as you can get, plus it’s quick and easy to knock up.
 
#45
I'm old enough to remember a time when naan was a rarity even in Indian restaurants, for it required the use of a tandoor clay oven, which were quite late to appear on the restaurant scene. Tandoori dishes were seldom seen, as everything was prepared on a kitchen hob and breads consisted almost solely of chapati, which are cooked on a griddle.
I do like my Tandoori chicken! Bloody delicious when done right!
 
#46
I'm a wimp. I like Chicken Korma. The best one I ever got was from a small restaurant in Comrie, near Cultybraggan Camp.
 
#47
Never use curry powder, curry paste or curry sauce when making curry and never use someone else's recipe. Get down to your local Asian sweety shop and get yourself a bag of: garam masala, cumin, turmeric, chilli powder (hot), ginger and coriander. You'll also need butter, onions, garlic and tomatoes, a splash of good vinegar and some decent stock. Start with a tea spoonful of each spice fried up with the onions and garlic and see how it goes. Within a few sessions you'll hit the right combination - think of it as the culinary equivalent of messing around in boats.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#49
I have my mum's curry recipe in her old recipe book, if memory serves me correctly it was copied off a sharwoods curry powder tub. As in the 70's that was the only curry powder available.

It does include an apple, sultanas, also a spoonful of jam,

No mention of milk or coconut milk or coconut cream, the latter had not been invented in the UK at that stage! Yoghurt could be added.

Thickening appeared to be cornflour.
 
#50
#51
Ah, those days! My Mother started with Vesta curries and decided she could do her own, the result was perfectly OK apart from it being green, I've no idea why to this day.....

@vvaannmmaann your Mothers is very like Elizabeth Ayrton's merchant navy breakfast curry. Try using chicken thighs rather than breast meat and Greek yoghurt. The meat can be cooked in the sauce for an hour or so without going ropey; the curry should be taken off the stove and off the boil before adding the yoghurt, and add it slowly with stirring - do not boil strongly after.

Have fun.
 
#52
Now I realise that means nothing to you lot.However you may still be able to help. She's dead now so asking her is tricky.Never wrote a recipe down, just remembered everything.
It was never too hot, but had chicken, curry powder, apples, sultans, onion, spices etc. Now at some point I'm sure milk was added and this transformed the dry ingredients into a lovely dark yellowy creamy consistency.
I've tried to repeat the recipe several times, but it's just not right. The chicken goes stringy, the 'sauce' splits... It's edible, but just not them same.
Any thoughts?
My Dad used to make a similar one. If my memory serves me correctly it was an adaptation of a Delia Smiths turkey one ( Replace chicken for Turkey)
English Colonial Turkey Curry
 
#53
Now I realise that means nothing to you lot.However you may still be able to help. She's dead now so asking her is tricky.Never wrote a recipe down, just remembered everything.
It was never too hot, but had chicken, curry powder, apples, sultans, onion, spices etc. Now at some point I'm sure milk was added and this transformed the dry ingredients into a lovely dark yellowy creamy consistency.
I've tried to repeat the recipe several times, but it's just not right. The chicken goes stringy, the 'sauce' splits... It's edible, but just not them same.
Any thoughts?
My mum made one of those, I will ask her.

I thought that Chinese Curry was 'Curry' growing up in Blackpool, we never had an Indian restaurant.

It wasn't until I was 21 that I went to an Indian Restaurant in Preston and realised the sheltered life I lead. Now have about 20 recipes for Indian Curry because the restaurants are lazy/cheap twunts who make it all taste the same.
 
#54
This is what I use for 6 different curries, the base:

How To Make The Curry Sauce

For approximately eight main course dishes.
Preparation and cooking time: 1 hr 30 minutes approx.

2 lb (900g) cooking onions
2 oz (50g) green ginger
2 oz (50g) garlic
2? pint (I litre 570ml) water
1 teaspoon salt
1 tin (8oz/225g) tomatoes
8 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon tomato puree
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon paprika

Stage One

Peel and rinse the onions, ginger, and garlic. Slice the onions and roughly chop the ginger and garlic.
Put the ginger and garlic into a blender with about ? pint of the water and blend until smooth.
Take a large saucepan and put into it the onions, the blended garlic and ginger, and the remainder of the water.
Add the salt and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat to very low and simmer, with the lid on, for 40-45 minutes.
Leave to cool.

Stage Two

Once cooled, pour half the boiled onion mixture into a blender and blend until perfectly smooth. Absolute smoothness is essential. To be certain, blend for at least two minutes. Pour the blended onion mixture into a clean pan or bowl and repeat with the other half of the boiled onion mixture.
Wash and dry the saucepan. Reserve about four tablespoons of the sauce at this stage to use in cooking the chicken and lamb.
Freezing. Freezing is best done at this stage.

Stage Three

Open the can of tomatoes, put into the rinsed blender jug, and blend. Again, it is important that they are blended perfectly smooth, so blend for two minutes.
Into the clean saucepan, pour the oil, tomato puree, turmeric, and paprika.
Add the blended tomatoes and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and cook, stirring occasionally, for ten minutes.
Now add the onion mixture to the saucepan and bring to the boil again. Turn down the heat enough to keep the sauce at a simmer.
You will notice at this stage that a froth rises to the surface of the sauce. This needs to be skimmed off.
Keep simmering for 20-25 minutes. Stirring now and again to prevent the sauce sticking to the bottom of the saucepan.
Use immediately or cool and refrigerate for up to four days.
 
#55
These recipe ideas are getting way too complicated. If you want a curry like the old woman used to make in the 70’s you keep it simple; curry powder, onions, meat, fruit, seasoning, that’s it. Garlic was a bit of a mystery in those days, but you might get lucky. When Homepride bought out their tinned Cook-In-Sauces it was seen as a cooking revolution to the public who endured regular power cuts and the 3 day week.
 
#57
Never use curry powder, curry paste or curry sauce when making curry and never use someone else's recipe. Get down to your local Asian sweety shop and get yourself a bag of: garam masala, cumin, turmeric, chilli powder (hot), ginger and coriander. You'll also need butter, onions, garlic and tomatoes, a splash of good vinegar and some decent stock. Start with a tea spoonful of each spice fried up with the onions and garlic and see how it goes. Within a few sessions you'll hit the right combination - think of it as the culinary equivalent of messing around in boats.
You have just strayed about as far away as is possible from the essence of a Mum's curry.
 
#58
Wouldn't attempt to duplicate your mum's but I do similar curries.

Brown the chicken off, set aside.
Saute finely chopped onion til colouring.
Add spices (possibly fruit at this point too).

* (If you've sauteed in butter/sufficient oil and you add some Flour/ powdered spices then add some milk you'll possibly get something similar to a bechamel sauce type thing but it sounds odd - guessing your mum's recipe).

Either way. Reintroduce chicken and coat.
I add a bit of chicken stock, fresh garlic and ginger (or your diced apple/sultanas here).

Let it cool, add yoghurt.
If you add ground almond or coconut cream at this point, even if the yoghurt split, it recombines.*

*Don't use no fat/low fat yoghurt/cream etc - they always split.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#59
milk was added and this transformed the dry ingredients into a lovely dark yellowy creamy consistency.
I've tried to repeat the recipe several times, but it's just not right. The chicken goes stringy, the 'sauce' splits
If you're going to add milk, do it toward the end. If you boil it hard, it will curdle. As the sauce comes back to the simmer, you must thicken it off with cornflour to prevent curdling and not hard boil it.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#60
For the perfect curry, I find the best recipe is the one used by my local Mother India takeaway.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Koschei The NAAFI Bar 6
phil245 Miscellaneous Jokes 0
phil245 Miscellaneous Jokes 0

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top