My favourite bridge (I know, I know!)

Marched over the top tier twice with the Légion
Late seventies, you could drive over on lower tier...
Almost as auld as jesus
Its where i live !
Near it, or under it?
 
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The top one is actually an aqueduct which originally supplied water to a nearby city. The stacking was to get the desired height while keeping the stone structure stable. They needed the height to carry the water across the valley along a gradual gradient.


We'll see if you look any better when you're 2000 years old.
Sorry, criticism of workmanship, was indended for Highways efforts on Great Musgrave bridge. I'll delete it.

CFB
 
Not a bridge, apologies for which, but I feel the same about North Kensington's Trellick Tower.
I had to point out recently on Nextdoor (hangout of nobbeds 'n weirdies) that it may be a fugly eyesore but it is ourView attachment 591691 fugly eyesore.
That is ******* vile.
 
Not a bridge, apologies for which, but I feel the same about North Kensington's Trellick Tower.
I had to point out recently on Nextdoor (hangout of nobbeds 'n weirdies) that it may be a fugly eyesore but it is ourView attachment 591691 fugly eyesore.
I quite like it, and it's a rare example of a modern tower that the architect who designed it lived in himself.
 
Forgotten it's name, Millau? Impressive. Wasn't the engineer a Brit?

The architect/designer was Sir Norman Foster (as stated above) but the highly innovative engineering was all French.

This is Foster's design:

1627294242973.png


The end result in the pictures is the French engineering (which, after all, is the second best in the world).

The gap between the design and the execution is measured in light years.


Video explaining the engineering problems and the solutions here:
 
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Another bridge that Olympics viewers will get familiar with as a backdrop is the Rainbow Bridge, so named after the multi-coloured evening floodlights- nothing to do with LGBT.

It links Tokyo with Odaiba, the artificial island in Tokyo where a lot of the events are held and the commentators often appear with their backs to the water and the bridge in the background, actually it's so large it's hard to get away from it.

The bridge has two levels, top one is the expressway, lower carries a local road, light local train and passenger walkway, On the Tokyo side, Lower deck trains and vehicle gain height by means of a spiral, fortunately walkers have stairs and a lift by the tower,

View from the island side

Rainbow Bridge1.png

(Wiki)
Couple of pics of the spiral
Rainbow Bridge2.png

Alamy
Rainbow Bridge.png

Google Maps


Cycling is banned (fortunately for the walkers, I wouldn't say the walk over is that scary, but I didn't need any cyclists whizzing by) and I was quite taken with the way that the bridge people enforce the dismounted pushing of bikes. At one end of the bridge, the cycle is fitted with a roller skate contraption on the rear wheel which allows the bike to be pushed, which is then surrendered at the other end.
Rainbow Bridge3.png
 
New Mersey Gateway bridge quite impressive, crossing River, Ship Canal and Railway line, 2020-11-25 021 (1).jpg
 
Another bridge that Olympics viewers will get familiar with as a backdrop is the Rainbow Bridge, so named after the multi-coloured evening floodlights- nothing to do with LGBT.

It links Tokyo with Odaiba, the artificial island in Tokyo where a lot of the events are held and the commentators often appear with their backs to the water and the bridge in the background, actually it's so large it's hard to get away from it.

The bridge has two levels, top one is the expressway, lower carries a local road, light local train and passenger walkway, On the Tokyo side, Lower deck trains and vehicle gain height by means of a spiral, fortunately walkers have stairs and a lift by the tower,

View from the island side

View attachment 592163
(Wiki)
Couple of pics of the spiral
View attachment 592164
Alamy
View attachment 592166
Google Maps


Cycling is banned (fortunately for the walkers, I wouldn't say the walk over is that scary, but I didn't need any cyclists whizzing by) and I was quite taken with the way that the bridge people enforce the dismounted pushing of bikes. At one end of the bridge, the cycle is fitted with a roller skate contraption on the rear wheel which allows the bike to be pushed, which is then surrendered at the other end.
View attachment 592169
I don't know if this is a stupid question or not but why can't you cycle over the bridge?

If you can walk over it it seems daft that you can't cycle. It should be easy to separate pedestrians, bikes and cars (I assume the really heavy stuff goes on the top bridge).
 
I don't know if this is a stupid question or not but why can't you cycle over the bridge?

If you can walk over it it seems daft that you can't cycle. It should be easy to separate pedestrians, bikes and cars (I assume the really heavy stuff goes on the top bridge).
Fair question,

I can only assume it's because of the narrowness of the footpath in places and maybe a temptation to speed up when going down the very long slope at the island end in the face of oncoming pedestrians.
RainbowPath.png


You're right about the heavy traffic being up top, here in pic it's path/two lane northern (or v.v.) roadway/railtrack and then a repeat for other direction.

It seems there was a competition to name the bridge, I wonder if the judges were aware that 'Crossing the Rainbow Bridge' was a euphemism used by serious pet lovers in the West for when Fido dies and heads for doggie heaven?
 

Chef

LE
I don't know if this is a stupid question or not but why can't you cycle over the bridge?

If you can walk over it it seems daft that you can't cycle. It should be easy to separate pedestrians, bikes and cars (I assume the really heavy stuff goes on the top bridge).
It doesn't look very wide:
RainbowPath.png


and I have no idea what Japanese bicycle riders are like but if they were London types it would be carnage as they battered their way through with another Deliveroo Maccy D.

Plus I'd have decreed it just to annoy the two wheeled dingbats.
 
It doesn't look very wide:
RainbowPath.png


and I have no idea what Japanese bicycle riders are like but if they were London types it would be carnage as they battered their way through with another Deliveroo Maccy D.

Plus I'd have decreed it just to annoy the two wheeled dingbats.

Yeah. Agree with that. I realised the picture alone answered my question.

The original picture gave me the impression the bridge was wider.
 
Um yes it is, as well as being an aqueduct.

As it was a toll bridge and there are people walking across it (and a vehicle could drive across it) on Google Street View, I think you might well be correct.

(Although the French website does seem to be rather over-egging the pudding with it's claim of "40 Centuries of history to discover")
 
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I have just read the Wiki entry on Pont Du Gard.

The drop in the aqueduct is less than half an inch per 600'. That is pretty impressive for something built 2000 years ago.

As is the fact that it is still standing I suppose.
 
As we have moved onto aqueducts, Spain has a shedload of Roman aqueducts, the most famous being the one in Segovia.

1627662893602.png


I dunno how long it is but it looks longer than the Pont Du Gard.

I haven't seen the Segovia one but I have seen plenty of the others. Always very impressive, doubly so given their age. Lots more here:

 
As we have moved onto aqueducts, Spain has a shedload of Roman aqueducts, the most famous being the one in Segovia.

View attachment 592734

I dunno how long it is but it looks longer than the Pont Du Gard.

I haven't seen the Segovia one but I have seen plenty of the others. Always very impressive, doubly so given their age. Lots more here:


ISTR something similar but smaller in Malta, supplying water to Valetta.
 
ISTR something similar but smaller in Malta, supplying water to Valetta.

There are two main aqueducts in Malta. Wignacourt, built in the 17thC and Gozo, built by the Brits in the 19thC.

I would be interested in knowing if there are any Roman ones there. It wouldn't surprise me in the least.

I have a suspicion that a lot of Roman aqueducts were converted into housing. All those nicely cut pieces of limestone with decayed/crumbling mortar between them. "Hmmmm. That will do nicely thank you. Stick it on the wagon Bill".
 
There are two main aqueducts in Malta. Wignacourt, built in the 17thC and Gozo, built by the Brits in the 19thC.

I would be interested in knowing if there are any Roman ones there. It wouldn't surprise me in the least.

I have a suspicion that a lot of Roman aqueducts were converted into housing. All those nicely cut pieces of limestone with decayed/crumbling mortar between them. "Hmmmm. That will do nicely thank you. Stick it on the wagon Bill".

Some of them ran long enough that a specific kind of stone formed from minerals dissolved in the water that precipitated in the pipework. This material was used in cathedrals in Germany hundreds of miles away from the source.
 

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