My favourite bridge (I know, I know!)

Richmond Bridge, Tasmania.

According to Wiki it is the oldest stone span bridge in Australia and was built by convicts.

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(My phots not t'interweb's)
 
Continuing with Sydney bridges, this pair I like. Dominating the picture, the Western tower of Anzac bridge, a typical modern cable stay.

At the bottom, the old Pyrmont swing bridge left in place swing open to rust when Anzac bridge opened.

When I first came to Sydney in the 90s, Pyrmont bridge was in the main thoroughfare going around the city to the west.
9B6BDA9E-2AEB-4681-BC98-3171800449A4.jpeg
 
Quite liked this bridge on the Aire and Calder Navigation (or possibly the Calder and Hebble - it’s not easy working out which bit is which). It is actually an aqueduct and carries the canal over the R. Calder about 30’ below.

Long shot:
F082E057-0659-4BE1-8036-C48CAE64A426.jpeg

I liked the Greek columns holding up the canal supported by the suspension bridge.

Better view of the columns, which also carry the bridge on the abutments:
262861A9-F21C-4BB2-B9AA-AF4BAE126406.jpeg


Background/history:
99DC3A3D-4202-449A-BC20-F474A3AB38A9.jpeg


The aqueduct:
255F3C4F-CBF6-4CFC-B80E-A2E164378228.jpeg

The new aqueduct is behind the Victorian one and is a fairly boring modern concrete structure.

There is another bridge to the right of the new aqueduct which is called a “ trash screen bridge”, something I have never heard of before. The Calder can flood up to the level of the aqueduct and the trash screen bridge was built to stop logs, trees etc impacting the aqueduct.

Info and pictures here: www.stanleyhistoryonline.com
 
Quite liked this bridge on the Aire and Calder Navigation (or possibly the Calder and Hebble - it’s not easy working out which bit is which). It is actually an aqueduct and carries the canal over the R. Calder about 30’ below.

Long shot:View attachment 358890
I liked the Greek columns holding up the canal supported by the suspension bridge.

Better view of the columns, which also carry the bridge on the abutments:
View attachment 358887

Background/history:
View attachment 358888

The aqueduct:
View attachment 358889
The new aqueduct is behind the Victorian one and is a fairly boring modern concrete structure.

There is another bridge to the right of the new aqueduct which is called a “ trash screen bridge”, something I have never heard of before. The Calder can flood up to the level of the aqueduct and the trash screen bridge was built to stop logs, trees etc impacting the aqueduct.

Info and pictures here: www.stanleyhistoryonline.com

The name George Leather seems to ring a few bells - I think he did a lot of Victorian water-related stuff. Hopefully with more success than his nephew John:
Great Sheffield Flood - Wikipedia
 
The name George Leather seems to ring a few bells - I think he did a lot of Victorian water-related stuff. Hopefully with more success than his nephew John:
Great Sheffield Flood - Wikipedia

That was a potential issue with the Stanley Ferry aqueduct and was the reason for building the trash screen bridge. Trees and logs had impacted it in the past and posed a structural risk to the aqueduct.

Any serious damage could crack the aqueduct tank and allow 7 million gallons of water to drop into the Calder and cause serious flash floods downstream. Plus the loss of hydraulic pressure would collapse both the canal sides and the aqueduct.

That’s the trash screen bridge on the right:
E591C769-A6B0-4D69-9286-0C4CC557420D.jpeg

The water levels look pretty similar for both the Navigation and the Calder in that picture. No idea when it was taken but last week the river was about 30’ below the canal. But the box girder trellis of the trash screen bridge was full of dead trees and big logs, so it does at least work.
 
That was a potential issue with the Stanley Ferry aqueduct and was the reason for building the trash screen bridge. Trees and logs had impacted it in the past and posed a structural risk to the aqueduct.

Any serious damage could crack the aqueduct tank and allow 7 million gallons of water to drop into the Calder and cause serious flash floods downstream. Plus the loss of hydraulic pressure would collapse both the canal sides and the aqueduct.

That’s the trash screen bridge on the right:
View attachment 359003
The water levels look pretty similar for both the Navigation and the Calder in that picture. No idea when it was taken but last week the river was about 30’ below the canal. But the box girder trellis of the trash screen bridge was full of dead trees and big logs, so it does at least work.

Reminds me, there's quite a complicated network of rivers and canals in that area, all heading for the Humber, with access from there to the Trent. Until recently carried a lot of power station coal, still a surprising amount of commercial traffic.
 
Reminds me, there's quite a complicated network of rivers and canals in that area, all heading for the Humber, with access from there to the Trent. Until recently carried a lot of power station coal, still a surprising amount of commercial traffic.
I used to row on the Don. Racing enormous commercial boats on the narrower sections was a sometimes hair-raising experience.
 
That was a potential issue with the Stanley Ferry aqueduct and was the reason for building the trash screen bridge. Trees and logs had impacted it in the past and posed a structural risk to the aqueduct.

Any serious damage could crack the aqueduct tank and allow 7 million gallons of water to drop into the Calder and cause serious flash floods downstream. Plus the loss of hydraulic pressure would collapse both the canal sides and the aqueduct.

That’s the trash screen bridge on the right:
View attachment 359003
The water levels look pretty similar for both the Navigation and the Calder in that picture. No idea when it was taken but last week the river was about 30’ below the canal. But the box girder trellis of the trash screen bridge was full of dead trees and big logs, so it does at least work.

That's the Canal & River Trust's workshop top left in that photo. I visited that place earlier this year to see the lock gates for our lock restoration project being manufactured. Amazing place where traditional wood and metal working skills are very evident. I didn't see a single computer-controlled machine, I think the newest bit of machinery was about fifty years old.

The guys showing us around said that floods earlier in the year had resulted in the river topping the bank and had caused serious concern over the stability of the bridges. T'was all calm and peaceful on the day of our visit.


This is not someone's favourite bridge.

What part of "Stop" is so difficult to understand?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
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Great Mesgrave Westmorland. Filled in with concrete by Highways to "make it safe".
Totally screwing plans for an 11 mile heritage railway.
Favorite because, crossed in most days. Straight on to Brough, KS and school.
Turn right, direct to KS, see pals, cinema etc.
 

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TamH70

MIA
Great Mesgrave Westmorland. Filled in with concrete by Highways to "make it safe".
Totally screwing plans for an 11 mile heretage railway.
Favorite because, crossed in most days. Straight on to Brough, KS and school.
Turn right, direct to KS, see pals, cinema etc.


Highways England are in the deep proverbial for that one - AFAIK at least two government (as in National, not Parish) agencies have told them to un-infill that bridge and spend the money on refurbishing it that infilling was supposed to save them.
 
Great Mesgrave Westmorland. Filled in with concrete by Highways to "make it safe".
Totally screwing plans for an 11 mile heretage railway.
Favorite because, crossed in most days. Straight on to Brough, KS and school.
Turn right, direct to KS, see pals, cinema etc.

Jeezus.

Wot a bunch of cnuts.

They might have to dig it out if they lose retrospective planning permission (probably unlikely).

It looks bleedin awful.

I assume the heritage railway would run underneath.


ETA: Acknowledgements to @TamH70 - posts crossed in the ether.
 
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In the UK, my favourite would have to be Kylsesku:

HiRes-Kylesku-Bridge-Quinag_190731_191516.jpg



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Kylesku+Bridge+020.jpg
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Strange to say, but that is both beautiful and an abomination at the same time

It is indeed out of context but is a huge time saver and benefit to the community
 
Did you mean Kylesku or was the extra S a typo?
Using your skill and judgement, where do you want to pin the tail on the donkey?
 

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