Muslims urged to speak up for Christians

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Hat20, May 17, 2006.

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  1. Be interesting to see what type of reaction from 'muslim community leaders' will be issued?

    LONDON (Reuters) - The main barrier to dialogue between Christians and Muslims is the failure of some countries in the Islamic world to respect freedom of worship, the country's leading Roman Catholic said on Tuesday.

    When Christians are persecuted in those countries, Muslims in Britain have a duty to speak up in their defence, said Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor, leader of the Catholic Church in England and Wales.

    "Dialogue will be impossible as long as minds are closed, as long as adherents of either faith believe that we have nothing to learn from the other," the cardinal said in a speech to the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

    "The main obstacle to that dialogue is the failure, in a number of Muslim countries, to uphold the principle of religious freedom."Tensions between Britain's Muslim and non-Muslim populations were exacerbated by last year's July 7 bombings in London, which killed 52 people and were carried out by four British Islamist extremists.

    Christians and non-believers alike urged Britain's 2.7 million Muslims to condemn the bombings, and the vast majority did. Some Christians have also urged Muslims to be more vocal in their condemnation of abuses in Islamic countries abroad.

    "Where Christians are being denied their rights, or are subject to sharia law, that is not a matter on which Muslims in Britain should remain silent," said Murphy-O'Connor, who speaks for around 4 million Catholics in Britain.

    He said there were "rising tensions" in the British Muslim community "which are spilling out on the edges of that community in an adherence to fundamentalist or nostalgic doctrines which approve violence".

    The cardinal drew a parallel between the experience of Muslims in Britain now -- many of whom complain of Islamophobia -- and that of Catholics in Britain in the 1970s, when sectarian violence in the British-controlled province in Northern Ireland was at its height.

    "There is much in our Catholic experience -- when being Catholic and Irish in the 1970s was to be equated in the minds of some with terrorism -- that must surely lead us to sympathise," he said.
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  2. Thats rich coming from a Catholic minister, hopefully they have learnt from past experience :?:
     
  3. And I bet there has been a wildly enthusiastic response from the Grand Imam and all his followers, hasn't there........
     
  4. Quiet isn't it.......................................................
     
  5. Thats an oxymoron :D
     
  6. Believe me Bag Charge, I wasn't holding my breath on this one. Thinking about it, the whole thing has a smack of the Monty Python's about it..... rather along the lines of the Spanish Inquisition sketch.... "nobody expects the Muslims to love us so, Cardinal Fang, administer the comfy armchair to the Mullah!" "NO! Not the comfy armchair bismallah!"
     
  7. Hmm, a member of the ruling class of the RCs moaning about closed minds and adherence to fundamentalist or nostalgic doctrines, pot/kettle methinks.

    Another example of why we must endavour to keep the secular mainstream world away from the kiddy-fiddling, racist, homophobic, fundamentalist, mentally-impaired, women-hating and power-hungry members of all religions.

    Plus, that last comment is just a load of balls. Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom and whilst a majority of its denizens want it to be, should remain so.

    Though, I have to say, there is much in my protestant (not religious, but as I am percieved to be, as a HR bod would put it) experience of 70s and 80s Belfast, that would surely lead me to sympathise with innocent people murdered at the supposed behest of a religion that fails to condemn such actions adequately.
     
  8. Just catholics? what about the hindu's, athiests, bhuddists, jews, etc etc etc etc.
     
  9. My thoughts exactly, as I'm sure many are aware, it's illegal to even take a bible into some countries (Saudi for one). To me that's a little like a small child with his fingers in his ears so he can't hear you when you say "There are religions other that Islam". I acknowledge the Muslim argument that as the country containing Islam's two Holiest Shrines, the Saudis don't want it contaminated by anything non-muslim, but I don't agree with it. The Vatican city could well take the same approach and forbid someone in Muslim dress visiting St Peter's but they don't. It's denial in an almost childlike form. I fully support religious tolerance, and find any kind of bigotry repulsive, but tolerance has to go both ways in order to really work, and in this day and age, it sadly doesn't.
     


  10. Excellent point and very well put. Get your own house in order before trying to sort out somebody else's.
     
  11. Can someone enlighten me to the reasoning behind Catholic bashing on this thread (not that I'm whining after all it's your board and I'm a guest)? Ties to the IRA correct?
     
  12. "Can someone enlighten me to the reasoning behind Catholic bashing on this thread (not that I'm whining after all it's your board and I'm a guest)? Ties to the IRA correct? "

    Sod all to do with PIRA all to do with whom the quote below came from: The Head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales.


    "LONDON (Reuters) - The main barrier to dialogue between Christians and Muslims is the failure of some countries in the Islamic world to respect freedom of worship, the country's leading Roman Catholic said on Tuesday"

    You Catholics are so sensitive.
     
  13. Because some people seem to have the following fixation in their minds:

    Catholic = IRA

    This lazy equation displays a fundamental misunderstanding of both Catholicsm and the IRA.

    However, sticking with this is easier than making any attempt to actually understand the situation. It amuses me to see how so many are so quick to dismiss Northern Ireland as a religious problem, when in fact the issue of religion is merely the easiest way of defining which 'tribe' one comes from - it is a means of identification, and has precious little to do with whether one recognises Papal authority or not. I am of the opinion that the ready dismissal of Northern Ireland and elsewhere as being the 'fault of 'religious nutters' is merely a lazy way of avoiding any real analysis of these problems.
     
  14. Not sensitive, just curious.
     
  15. Look on the bright side, We all will learn the truth on Friday.

    Tom Hanks would never lie