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Multi-faith coronation for Charles

Do you support multi-faith coronation?

  • It is absolutely unacceptable.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The idea is not stupid but I prefer traditional coronation

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Exellent idea!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • A rabbi, a mufti and a priest should perform the coronation.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
#1
Canon John Hall, the Dean-elect of Westminster Abbey, said that the traditional Church of England coronation service must be revised to reflect society's changes since the Queen's coronation in 1953. As dean, he will be on the committee responsible for drawing up the service.

"The coronation service needs to find the right way of including people of other faiths," Canon Hall told The Sunday Telegraph. "It must be different in some ways because of the nature of society and how things have changed."
 
#3
KGB_resident said:
Canon John Hall, the Dean-elect of Westminster Abbey, said that the traditional Church of England coronation service must be revised to reflect society's changes since the Queen's coronation in 1953. As dean, he will be on the committee responsible for drawing up the service.

"The coronation service needs to find the right way of including people of other faiths," Canon Hall told The Sunday Telegraph. "It must be different in some ways because of the nature of society and how things have changed."
I don't think he necessarily means multi-faith, as in your poll, but rather inclusion of other faiths. There is a strong tradition in the CofE of seeking to be bridge-makers with other faiths; a sign of some confidence in their own institution, that diverse views are embraced. It's right to bring their traditions up to date also. Another theory is that Charles is likely to be behind such moves since he regarded himself 'Defender of faith' rather than one particular faith. This is a difficult one though. Multi-faith is a contradiction in terms.
 
#6
PartTimePongo said:
I think this is a move to bridge the frankly ridiculous gap between Anglicans and Catholics
Said with feeling PtP?

My observation is that there are a lot more mature relations between the two branches than there has ever been. The Church seems to attract its eccentrics and extremists but it's interesting to note the number of people from what I call 'normal' backgrounds choosing to contribute in a pastoral capacity via a vicarship somewhere. The Church certain feels in parts more in touch with the 'real world'. Sadly not always the case. I recall the odd sadist chaplain on exercise giving his three point message followed by ten point prayers despite the rain lashing at 90 degrees and hypothermia setting in choosing not to deviate from his interminable notes, although he was ensconced in a little tent pulpit we'd set up for him, clearly pissing everyone off immensely. Then being totally unapproachable after the event. Thankfully the SASRA guys are the antithesis of this.
 
#11
How can the Supreme Govenor of the Church of England have a multi-faith Coronation? The only way he can do this is to disestablish the Church. Does he imagine he can be Head of Faiths in Britain? The idea is absurd, not least because how can you be head of a faith like Christianity which regards Christ as the son of God with the Judeo-Muslim position which rejects this idea?

Can he be a Defender of Faiths? Well not really. Constitutionally his position is clear: he must defend the Christian Faith as embodied in the CoE. Also how can he defend one religious ideological position over another? He claims he is a conservative Christian. How does he square this claim with his behaviour? For genuine conservative Christians the idea of having a Supreme Governor who has committed adultery is outrageous, no less acceptable than having a gay Bishop, and morally equivalent!

I am afraid that Prince Charles often engages his mouth before his brain! He surrounds himself with advisors who do not seem able to respectfully challenge his more absurd ideas with the result that he often publically makes a fool of himself. When he becomes King this behaviour could prove disasterous.
 
#12
I would like to see the rest of the article. i don't see how "The coronation service needs to find the right way of including people of other faiths," becomes "a multi-faith coronation."
Certainly the service at St Pauls for HM's 80th had a large contingent of senior representatives from other faiths. I'm quite sure the coronation will be the same.
All Canon Hall says is that he is in charge of modernising the 1953 order of service and will do just that.
 

Nehustan

On ROPS
On ROPs
#13
PartTimePongo said:
I think this is a move to bridge the frankly ridiculous gap between Anglicans and Catholics
Well with the Duchess being a Catholic 1701 will be going out of the window....

(***Pinches himself!!!! Did I just say that 8O )
 
B

benjaminw1

Guest
#15
PartTimePongo said:
I think this is a move to bridge the frankly ridiculous gap between Anglicans and Catholics
Weell, they are different sides of the same heretical coin.... :D
 
#18
Sadly, in my opinion, Charles just loses credibility with this. As BSL above says, the concept is a contradiction in terms. Not only that, of course, it indicates a confused appreciation of what 'faith' is in the first place.

I believed in pixies until I was about five, I think.
 
#19
Not at all sure of the details but I think you will find that the "Anointing", taken place under wraps (literally) during a coronation has a deeply religious significance with regard to upholding the monarch's duty to the Christian church and the upholding of that faith. So secret tthat no details are known except by the few initiates? Any "insiders" out there with better knowledge than I?
 
#20
growler said:
Not at all sure of the details but I think you will find that the "Anointing", taken place under wraps (literally) during a coronation has a deeply religious significance with regard to upholding the monarch's duty to the Christian church and the upholding of that faith. So secret tthat no details are known except by the few initiates? Any "insiders" out there with better knowledge than I?
Apologies for the cut and paste, but this might clear up the anointing question:


The religious overtones of a medieval coronation are thought to originate with ancient concepts of divine kingship and priest-kings. Medieval French tradition held that the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove delivered a holy oil, or chrism, to the early Christian King Clovis (a form of the name Louis). Anointment with this holy chrism transferred divine grace to its recipient and a custom developed of anointing all kings of France upon their succession. French kings (and other European kings who followed this custom, including the English) therefore became kings Dei gratia, ‘by the grace of God.’ Even in modern times, Queen Elizabeth II received the appellation Dei gratia regina (abbreviated to ‘D.G. REG’ on British coins) after her anointing. The anointing ceremony most often accompanied the ceremony of coronation, which involved the actual placing of the crown on the head of the monarch, and provided earthly confirmation of the succession.
 

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