Mugabe Facing Regime Change ?

#1
If Mugabe needs outside help its an indication that he cannot rely on his security forces. The Ninjas are pretty brutal and may be the spark that will send the people into the streets.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/africa/article1550900.ece

About 2,500 Angolan paramilitary police, feared in their own country for their brutality, are to be deployed in Zimbabwe, raising concerns of an escalation in violence against those opposed to President Mugabe.

Kembo Mohadi, Zimbabwe’s Home Affairs Minister, confirmed their imminent arrival, with 1,000 Angolans expected on April 1 and the rest in batches of 500. Angola is regarded as the most powerful military nation in Africa, after South Africa.

The deployment comes amid reports of concern in President Mugabe’s Government over the capability of the country’s own police force to suppress outbreaks of unrest, which are mostly in Harare’s volatile townships.

The townships have been under curfew for about three weeks; one man has been shot dead and hundreds of civilians injured. Morgan Tsvangirai, the leader of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change, and about 30 opposition activists are still recovering from beatings they received when police suppressed an attempted rally on March 11.
 
#2
Can you hear the deafening silence from the government?

Where are all the anti apartheid activists? Don't they care about oppresssion in Africa any more..

Now where's Peter Hain? Oh I forgot, Mugabe is the wrong colour to be criticised too much.
 
#3
The_Cad said:
Can you hear the deafening silence from the government?

Where are all the anti apartheid activists? Don't they care about oppresssion in Africa any more..

Now where's Peter Hain? Oh I forgot, Mugabe is the wrong colour to be criticised too much.
Endgame in Zim, I'm afraid. The dragon's teeth sown at the Lancaster House Agreement (a.k.a. The Great Betrayal) have sprung up armed men, and Zimbabwe is bleeding badly.

A huge amount of what Ian Smith predicted has now come to pass.

I get almost daily emails from pals in Zim. who have been too poor or too stubborn to leave for Oz, NZ, Mozambique etc., as so many other Zimmers have over the years; and they all see nothing now but a fast slide to chaos.

Mbeke of RSA has been pusillanimous to an intolerable degree (apparently Mugabe did his father some favours and he feels personally obligated); but now that Tutu, Mandela and many others are really shouting for denunciation of the Mugabe regime, he will probably be forced to speak out sooner rather than later. The risks of chaos overspill into RSA are very real.

The chances of any input from Bliar? He may be forced to send aid, when things get really dire; and he might help airlift a few UK passport holders to safety in some kind of token gesture. But nothing more.

"Bleed, bleed, poor country . . .. ."
 
#4
In my estimation this despot is being allowed to dig his own grave. Diplomatic pressure from other black countries means that military action is not on the cards but Zimbabwe is being bled dry by sanctions and the actions of ZPF to the point where there will be either a coup detat or a full scale rebellion. In either case Mugabe will not live to see a natural end.
 
#6
GDav said:
In my estimation this despot is being allowed to dig his own grave. Diplomatic pressure from other black countries means that military action is not on the cards but Zimbabwe is being bled dry by sanctions and the actions of ZPF to the point where there will be either a coup detat or a full scale rebellion. In either case Mugabe will not live to see a natural end.
Correct - if the emails from Zim are to be believed. He has overreached himself this time, and the walls are falling in.

Interestingly, no-one in Zim seems to be expecting a coup, and the MDC seem to be the obvious party of government when things settle again (although they seem naive, and have no track record of ever having achieved much, apart from being a focus for discontent with the Mugabe regime).

Local feeling seems to be that the immediate future will simply be a matter of survival amid country-wide chaos.

Watch out for the top brass of ZANU-PF exiting soonish by private aircraft to asylum in various north African states, from which they can access those Swiss bank accounts. Mugabe may perhaps stay to die in a ditch, in which case good riddance.
 
#7
caubeen said:
GDav said:
In my estimation this despot is being allowed to dig his own grave. Diplomatic pressure from other black countries means that military action is not on the cards but Zimbabwe is being bled dry by sanctions and the actions of ZPF to the point where there will be either a coup detat or a full scale rebellion. In either case Mugabe will not live to see a natural end.
Correct - if the emails from Zim are to be believed. He has overreached himself this time, and the walls are falling in.

Interestingly, no-one in Zim seems to be expecting a coup, and the MDC seem to be the obvious party of government when things settle again (although they seem naive, and have no track record of ever having achieved much, apart from being a focus for discontent with the Mugabe regime).

Local feeling seems to be that the immediate future will simply be a matter of survival amid country-wide chaos.

Watch out for the top brass of ZANU-PF exiting soonish by private aircraft to asylum in various north African states, from which they can access those Swiss bank accounts. Mugabe may perhaps stay to die in a ditch, in which case good riddance.
Will the international powers allow them to exodus and bleed the country dry? They did with Idi Amin but the world has changed since then and, in my opinion, even the African states would pursue the recovery of stolen money or goods.

Marcos is a good example.
 
#8
Agreed, where is the repulsive Hain ?

He had enough to say when he was over here agitating years ago.

Why was he allowed to stay here ? Why, oh! why, do the good people of Neath - Castell Nedd - have the oily, smarmy, self-seeking, self-congratulating shyster as their MP ?
 
#9
Thabo Mbeki does not mind if the end-game in Zimbabwe is a brutal one. It serves as a stick to wave at his own white citizens, should they be recalcitrant on land ownership "reform".

As for refugees, South Africa has been cherry-picking white and black refugees with skills and quals for some time now.
 
#10
Shoot the twat - end ex
 
#11
GDav said:
caubeen said:
GDav said:
In my estimation this despot is being allowed to dig his own grave. Diplomatic pressure from other black countries means that military action is not on the cards but Zimbabwe is being bled dry by sanctions and the actions of ZPF to the point where there will be either a coup detat or a full scale rebellion. In either case Mugabe will not live to see a natural end.
Correct - if the emails from Zim are to be believed. He has overreached himself this time, and the walls are falling in.

Interestingly, no-one in Zim seems to be expecting a coup, and the MDC seem to be the obvious party of government when things settle again (although they seem naive, and have no track record of ever having achieved much, apart from being a focus for discontent with the Mugabe regime).

Local feeling seems to be that the immediate future will simply be a matter of survival amid country-wide chaos.

Watch out for the top brass of ZANU-PF exiting soonish by private aircraft to asylum in various north African states, from which they can access those Swiss bank accounts. Mugabe may perhaps stay to die in a ditch, in which case good riddance.
Will the international powers allow them to exodus and bleed the country dry? They did with Idi Amin but the world has changed since then and, in my opinion, even the African states would pursue the recovery of stolen money or goods.

Marcos is a good example.
Difficult to see how they could be stopped, if they had a willing, pre-arranged welcome in another state. The end has been in sight for so long in Zim that they've had plenty of time to plan their departure. Presumably all they've got to do now is make that phone call.

Whatever they take (or have already exported for stashing away), Zimbabwe will retain huge mineral wealth, and its land will still be fertile, and that can't be uplifted and spirited away. The immediate problems will include the destruction of the infrastructure of machinery etc. and the decimation and scattering of the population.

And there is always AIDS . . . .

Grim!
 
#12
I have just read on AOL News a Harare court has ruled the injured activists may leave the country to seek medical help. Big question: Will the police let them leave ?
 
#13
heythrop said:
I have just read on AOL News a Harare court has ruled the injured activists may leave the country to seek medical help. Big question: Will the police let them leave ?
Good point.

Seems the Zim judiciary are still held in some regard, and have maintained some independence; but the realities of Zim. life still have to be faced outside the courtroom.

From comment I've had from Zim friends, I doubt it they'll be permitted to leave
.
 
#14
One of the news agencys reported a few days ago that there were now problems with paying at least some of the army and police, That does tend to be a sign of the end.
 
#15
caubeen said:
GDav said:
caubeen said:
GDav said:
In my estimation this despot is being allowed to dig his own grave. Diplomatic pressure from other black countries means that military action is not on the cards but Zimbabwe is being bled dry by sanctions and the actions of ZPF to the point where there will be either a coup detat or a full scale rebellion. In either case Mugabe will not live to see a natural end.
Correct - if the emails from Zim are to be believed. He has overreached himself this time, and the walls are falling in.

Interestingly, no-one in Zim seems to be expecting a coup, and the MDC seem to be the obvious party of government when things settle again (although they seem naive, and have no track record of ever having achieved much, apart from being a focus for discontent with the Mugabe regime).

Local feeling seems to be that the immediate future will simply be a matter of survival amid country-wide chaos.

Watch out for the top brass of ZANU-PF exiting soonish by private aircraft to asylum in various north African states, from which they can access those Swiss bank accounts. Mugabe may perhaps stay to die in a ditch, in which case good riddance.
Will the international powers allow them to exodus and bleed the country dry? They did with Idi Amin but the world has changed since then and, in my opinion, even the African states would pursue the recovery of stolen money or goods.

Marcos is a good example.
Difficult to see how they could be stopped, if they had a willing, pre-arranged welcome in another state. The end has been in sight for so long in Zim that they've had plenty of time to plan their departure. Presumably all they've got to do now is make that phone call.

Whatever they take (or have already exported for stashing away), Zimbabwe will retain huge mineral wealth, and its land will still be fertile, and that can't be uplifted and spirited away. The immediate problems will include the destruction of the infrastructure of machinery etc. and the decimation and scattering of the population.

And there is always AIDS . . . .

Grim!
The assets of individuals can be frozen - even if the "gnomes" object. It could take years to resolve and in the meantime they would be forced to live in poverty.
 
#16
GDav said:
caubeen said:
GDav said:
caubeen said:
GDav said:
In my estimation this despot is being allowed to dig his own grave. Diplomatic pressure from other black countries means that military action is not on the cards but Zimbabwe is being bled dry by sanctions and the actions of ZPF to the point where there will be either a coup detat or a full scale rebellion. In either case Mugabe will not live to see a natural end.
Correct - if the emails from Zim are to be believed. He has overreached himself this time, and the walls are falling in.

Interestingly, no-one in Zim seems to be expecting a coup, and the MDC seem to be the obvious party of government when things settle again (although they seem naive, and have no track record of ever having achieved much, apart from being a focus for discontent with the Mugabe regime).

Local feeling seems to be that the immediate future will simply be a matter of survival amid country-wide chaos.

Watch out for the top brass of ZANU-PF exiting soonish by private aircraft to asylum in various north African states, from which they can access those Swiss bank accounts. Mugabe may perhaps stay to die in a ditch, in which case good riddance.
Will the international powers allow them to exodus and bleed the country dry? They did with Idi Amin but the world has changed since then and, in my opinion, even the African states would pursue the recovery of stolen money or goods.

Marcos is a good example.
Difficult to see how they could be stopped, if they had a willing, pre-arranged welcome in another state. The end has been in sight for so long in Zim that they've had plenty of time to plan their departure. Presumably all they've got to do now is make that phone call.

Whatever they take (or have already exported for stashing away), Zimbabwe will retain huge mineral wealth, and its land will still be fertile, and that can't be uplifted and spirited away. The immediate problems will include the destruction of the infrastructure of machinery etc. and the decimation and scattering of the population.

And there is always AIDS . . . .

Grim!
The assets of individuals can be frozen - even if the "gnomes" object. It could take years to resolve and in the meantime they would be forced to live in poverty.
That's probably the best we can hope for.

But since asset-freezing has been well known about for some time, and since the Zim. gravytrain for the ZANU-PF top brass was not going to last for ever, it seems safe to assume they'll have tried to circumvent it somehow by contingency planning. Easily portable diamond hoards seem to be one very likely option, according to Zimmers.

Re army and police pay, one chap living about 130 miles from Harare says his local police and garrison haven't been paid since last November, and that poor/delayed pay for all State employees has been a chronic problem in Zim for years.
 
#17
I know that payments for public employees are a problem and the infrastructure is disintegrating from the inside out.

That could be where the rebellion starts from.
 
#18
When the parasitic murdering politicos and supporters of Mugabe leave by air, up with the fast jets, divert aircraft to Schipol airport, unload said barstewards, on with the irons and a pleasant drive to Den Haag for a fair trial.

If they leave by road - THEM - and then load onto aircraft - in chains - next stop - Den Haag.

Will it happen? - will it fcuk!

Mugabe - TLAM!
 
#19
When the parasitic murdering politicos and supporters of Mugabe leave by air, up with the fast jets, divert aircraft to Schipol airport, unload said barstewards, on with the irons and a pleasant drive to Den Haag for a fair trial.

If they leave by road - THEM - and then load onto aircraft - in chains - next stop - Den Haag.

Will it happen? - will it fcuk!

Mugabe - TLAM!
 
#20
rickshaw-major said:
When the parasitic murdering politicos and supporters of Mugabe leave by air, up with the fast jets, divert aircraft to Schipol airport, unload said barstewards, on with the irons and a pleasant drive to Den Haag for a fair trial.

If they leave by road - THEM - and then load onto aircraft - in chains - next stop - Den Haag.

Will it happen? - will it fcuk!

Mugabe - TLAM!
Precisely so. Bliar doesn't want to get involved in this Zim business if at all poss. He has other fish to fry in Africa in May, and is probably desperately hoping this doesn't rock his planned boat, in the run-down to his retirement.
 

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