MP mauled on ITV news over PTSD

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by wheel, Oct 18, 2006.

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  1. Just been watching ITV evening news where Veterans Minister Derek Twigg has just been given a severe mauling by the interviewer over the treatment of veterans suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. ITV have a section on their website entitled Betrayed. Looks like they have got their teeth into this issue although the BBC did start up on this a few months ago but then it faded away. Seems that vetrans who need help are being let down by the goverment and that charities and welfare groups are picking up the pieces.
     
  2. Spanish_Dave

    Spanish_Dave LE Good Egg (charities)

    He was pathetic, the last letter of cancellation for my war pension injury did not even offer me a new appointment, my wife rang and was offered a date for me in March, that would be 14 months after I was last seen,(coincidentally not by the consultant but his junior) I think its about 18 months since I last saw the consultant and that was after insisting :(
     
  3. I was very surprised to hear him say that ex mill get priority treatment. My wife who is a psychiatric nurse was also a bit surprised also.

    Can any one say they have had priority treatment or jumped queues.
     
  4. ViroBono

    ViroBono LE Moderator


    I haven't seen the interview, but he was probably referring to War Pensioners, who are supposed to get priority in the NHS, for the condition for which the WP was awarded. Many NHS trusts seem to be unaware of the provision.
     
  5. He was refering to all ex mill as getting priority treatment. Although the vetrans who were interviewed all dissagreed most had to resort to charities.
     
  6. BiscuitsAB

    BiscuitsAB LE Moderator

    I can confirm that as ex. mil you can get priority and that it is laid out in NHS guide lines, you just have to be a bit forcefull in your requsts. I did it and got an appt in under 4 weeks.
     
  7. Did you know that the NHS commit fraud on there prescriptions. The last line on the script should say serving soldier sailor or airman. Funny when you are on leave and have to visit a hospital or clinic you end up paying for your prescription. You can claim back expenses from the pay office, but on the receipt your medication is not refered to and there is no forwarding note to the mo which causes a admin headache. All because the NHS has deliberately left of the last line of exemptions!

    By the way I had to wait 3 months for my PTSR referal, PTSR is the fore runner to PTSD and should be treated within the honeymoon period on return to UK. Cheers twiggy what have I got to look forward too in 12 years now!

    Armadillo.
     
  8. Good on ITV for focusing on this issue and chasing it!
     
  9. Can you add it on or ask the Pharmacist?
     
  10. Better not to know. Trust me.

    Hoping you get the treatment you need.
     
  11. ViroBono

    ViroBono LE Moderator

    I fear you may be raising false hopes.

    Here's the current Health Service Guidance (dated Feb 04, updated Aug 06). It only mentions priority treatment for War Pensioners. As I said above, this only applies for the condition for which the War Pension is awarded, and only then provided there is no-one else with greater clinical need.

     
  12. There was an interview with an anonymous soldier on BFBS Reports about his treatment in an NHS ward in the Midlands... probably Selly Oak.

    Injured personnel land at night and are taken to the cargo area of Birmingham Airport before being taken to Selly Oak. He was plonked on a ward with civvies. He wasn't impressed with the standard of care i.e. he reported that staff ignored his buzzer for attention for 4 -5 hrs (they also ignored the other patients on the ward). Some RAF Consultant was then interviewed and he waffled on about how good the NHS is etc etc and that keeping mil only wards/ hospitals was inefficient. How typically RAF to think about efficiency over moral.

    The NHS is crap. I was treated after a car accidnt and I wasn't impressed by it (I was left on a trolley in the corridor for hours in A&E; I had to make the call to the ward to get taken up!)

    There may be good reasons to take the casualty to the cargo area, there may be good reasons to do it at night...... but it sends out all the wrong signals.

    I'm not surprised the press are onto all of this - it's a disgrace.
     
  13. ViroBono

    ViroBono LE Moderator

    Landing at night and being offloaded in the cargo area aren't really issues. What is an issue is that only the most seriously injured go to Birmingham Airport - most land at Brize Norton, and then have a long road journey to get to Selly Oak. Still, it saves MOD the landing fees...

    The consultant interviewed was reflecting the party line, not an RAF view. To an extent he is right; specialist treatment such as burns is best carried out in the NHS. The argument about military-only wards is slightly academic, given the dire state of DMS manning levels.

    As far as poor standards of nursing are concerned, patients need to start making formal complaints, both through the RCDM staff and the NHS. At RCDM, the Welfare Officers can facilitate complaints through the military system, with the Patient Advice and Liaison Service for the NHS.
     
  14. I can guess which mast your colours are well and truly nailed too.

    As ViroBono mentions the decision to get rid of service-only wards was not a purely RAF one. As someone who previously worked for DEMETA I can tell you that the drive for efficiency at the time was being pushed by a senior RN bod and before that a senior Army bod. Senior officers want to be very senior officers eventually and they'll jump through any hoop the government places in front of them to get there, no matter what service they come from.

    To think, I thought that the military was starting to mature and realise that although we wear many different uniforms we have the same goal and that single service bigotry has no pace any more. Appears I'm sadly mistaken when some are concerned.

    Yes it'd be great to have service only wards and I think there should be such, but the days of being able to afford whole hospitals are behind us for financial reasons but also for skill fade reasons. Present conflicts aside how much real use would the burns units and facial reconstructive surgery units of a purely military get? Have proper military only wards attached to NHS hospitals rather than the present situation of squeezing service personnel into whatever beds are available which are usually the Urology beds in my experience, never the best place to be.
     
  15. Why do you think that the armed forces cannot have a military hospital? If the civvies can have a civvie hospital then there is no reason whatsoever for not having military ones. The military hospital could be created as a special unit within the NHS and funded accordingly.

    When there is no major conflict (so that will only be after Tonee and the WMF have been shot) the hospital can have 'civvie only' wards - in times of peace nearly all the hospital should be full of civvies. Then when a scrap kicks off and the boys start getting hurt, they displace the civvies, returning the hospital to a pure military establishment.

    The doctors and nurses would be (ideally) military, but would be interspersed with civvie specialists, and would also spend time in other NHS hospitals (and also go to the US to receive training, 2yr postings etc).

    That way the forces could have an excellent trauma unit, burns unit and reconstructive surgury all within house. As for location, so long as it is within shouting distance of an airport (and every city in the country has an airfield nearby that can take at least a Herc) there should be no problems. If in a decent sized city (e.g. Manchester) then the Govt can do a deal with the local Marriott, InterConti, etc to have rooms reserved for relatives of the injured: this can be done for much less than the Civil Service would have people believe (but then these people are the cnuts who pay 120 quid a night for a hotel room when a civvie business (like mine) pays only 50 for the same room or better).

    Rant over, but I am bored to tears of people queueing up to say why we cannot have a military hospital. The only real reason is petty politics and the intransigence of the scum that occupy 1 Horse Guards Road (the address of the Treasury in case you didn't know).