Moving to the US

Hello, I have been saving for quite a long time to buy some land in the UK, build a home with my own hands and enjoy the 2nd half of my life in peace, with no neighbours, off grid.

The trouble is that the UK simply does not have the space anymore, any vaguely suitable places are so bound up in red tape that they are off the table or unaffordable.

I've since been looking further afield, Sweden was on the cards for a while but Brexit has complicated this through uncertainty plus, having lived numerous country's that do not speak english before, I was to move to an english speaking country because it is just so much easier to fit in and make friends. I am also a very keen shooter and US gun laws are appealing to me as I could actually exercise my itch to join 2 gun events and actually shoot pistols.

What I am thinking about now is obtaining the necessary paperwork to legally reside in the US (green card), perhaps even go for citizenship eventually if it's worth it, buy a large'ish propety (100+ acres) with permission to build a nice home and eventually homestead it. I'll pay for this upfront in cash, no loans or mortgages, I dont have any debt and wont take on any new debt either, not for any reason. I'm not opposed to joining the National Guard or similar for a period of time to show willing.

Area's I am considering are Alaska, Montanna, Georgia, Ohio or Missouri but am fairly open to suggestions. The criteria are quite basic, Forest, low tax, lots of space, good gun laws, not too hot.

I realise that i'll probably have to seek gainful employment in order to qualify and pay taxes. I usually work self employed or through one of my ltd companies in the UK and Europe, hate the idea of working for others but I expect that this is where the problems arise in the US.

I did 10 years in the RE as an electrician, didn't actually do much sparks work in all that time to be honest but it's one of my trades none the less, I can fill hesco, dig holes, assemble bridges, blow things up, wash vehicles, stand about chatting, and drink heavily if required. I also got a bunch AT quals which are still valid. Since leaving though i've been working as a Solutions Architect designing and building technical solutions to telecommunications problems. This is a mix if IT, Networking, Storage, Databases, Scripting, Drawings, Data centre infrastructure management and all that stuff. It's a niche skill and I have a demonstrable career history working at the leading edge.

I'd prefer to do this on a self employed or through my own business, working as a contractor for US based companies. This I would do until I had enough money to sit back and retreat to my homestead to live out the rest of my days.

If they were to grant me the opportunity to reside there, what would I have to do in return?,get a job or can i start a business there? How does one....get a job....when you have no legal right to be there? It's a chicken and egg thing

I've read some of the other threads about this but none of them seem to match my slightly awkward wishes.

Where should the first point of enquiry be made and is there anything to say or not say to make it all go a lot more smoothly (mentioning anything to do with firearms would probably be a bad thing for example).

Cheers
 
Hello, I have been saving for quite a long time to buy some land in the UK, build a home with my own hands and enjoy the 2nd half of my life in peace, with no neighbours, off grid.

The trouble is that the UK simply does not have the space anymore, any vaguely suitable places are so bound up in red tape that they are off the table or unaffordable.

I've since been looking further afield, Sweden was on the cards for a while but Brexit has complicated this through uncertainty plus, having lived numerous country's that do not speak english before, I was to move to an english speaking country because it is just so much easier to fit in and make friends. I am also a very keen shooter and US gun laws are appealing to me as I could actually exercise my itch to join 2 gun events and actually shoot pistols.

What I am thinking about now is obtaining the necessary paperwork to legally reside in the US (green card), perhaps even go for citizenship eventually if it's worth it, buy a large'ish propety (100+ acres) with permission to build a nice home and eventually homestead it. I'll pay for this upfront in cash, no loans or mortgages, I dont have any debt and wont take on any new debt either, not for any reason. I'm not opposed to joining the National Guard or similar for a period of time to show willing.

Area's I am considering are Alaska, Montanna, Georgia, Ohio or Missouri but am fairly open to suggestions. The criteria are quite basic, Forest, low tax, lots of space, good gun laws, not too hot.

I realise that i'll probably have to seek gainful employment in order to qualify and pay taxes. I usually work self employed or through one of my ltd companies in the UK and Europe, hate the idea of working for others but I expect that this is where the problems arise in the US.

I did 10 years in the RE as an electrician, didn't actually do much sparks work in all that time to be honest but it's one of my trades none the less, I can fill hesco, dig holes, assemble bridges, blow things up, wash vehicles, stand about chatting, and drink heavily if required. I also got a bunch AT quals which are still valid. Since leaving though i've been working as a Solutions Architect designing and building technical solutions to telecommunications problems. This is a mix if IT, Networking, Storage, Databases, Scripting, Drawings, Data centre infrastructure management and all that stuff. It's a niche skill and I have a demonstrable career history working at the leading edge.

I'd prefer to do this on a self employed or through my own business, working as a contractor for US based companies. This I would do until I had enough money to sit back and retreat to my homestead to live out the rest of my days.

If they were to grant me the opportunity to reside there, what would I have to do in return?,get a job or can i start a business there? How does one....get a job....when you have no legal right to be there? It's a chicken and egg thing

I've read some of the other threads about this but none of them seem to match my slightly awkward wishes.

Where should the first point of enquiry be made and is there anything to say or not say to make it all go a lot more smoothly (mentioning anything to do with firearms would probably be a bad thing for example).

Cheers
Good luck. I've had a few friends do it, but three were via their current employment (BAe, Siemens and Amazon), and the other was a slightly less reputable route.

My Missus is an American who moved to this side of the pond. One of the things she does to help others moving to the UK is via a Facebook group called "American Women in the UK". Theres a load of shite in there, but people post questions all the time and help each other out.

It might be worth seeing if there is a British Expats in the US group, who could help in some small way with your circumstances. I'll have a look later.

Other than that there's a few members here who've moved out I believe.

@SOCALSapper @Sam The Bam

Edit: Theres a British expats in the USA facebook group.
 
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Move to Canada, you get the best of both worlds, basically a split between the UK and US. Cheaper land, good healthcare, you can join the Reserves easy enough, and easier for your UK credentials to be recognized.
 
Move to Canada, you get the best of both worlds, basically a split between the UK and US. Cheaper land, good healthcare, you can join the Reserves easy enough, and easier for your UK credentials to be recognized.
Just out of interest mate, what are property taxes like up your way?
 

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
Just contact an immigration attorney.
Be careful with immigration attorneys. If you do hire one, sit down with them and tell them exactly how you want to be represented.

At the suggestion of a friend, I hired one when I moved to Canada in 1989. She nearly cost me the job offer I'd been given because of her arrogance during a meeting with my prospective employers. They told me later that they came close to kicking her out and withdrawing the offer.
 
Be careful with immigration attorneys. If you do hire one, sit down with them and tell them exactly how you want to be represented.

At the suggestion of a friend, I hired one when I moved to Canada in 1989. She nearly cost me the job offer I'd been given because of her arrogance during a meeting with my prospective employers. They told me later that they came close to kicking her out and withdrawing the offer.
The Brits out here that I know came over on the marriage lottery. I haven’t a clue what kind of hoops one has to jump through as a non citizen.
 
The Brits out here that I know came over on the marriage lottery. I haven’t a clue what kind of hoops one has to jump through as a non citizen.
The hoops are many and varied, and above all, expensive to get through. I was on an L1 intra-company transfer and I know that it was an expensive business for the company. Even the interview and rubber stamp at the Consulate cost us something like $450 for each family member, but I shudder to think what the petition paperwork produced by the Attorney cost the company.
 
The Brits out here that I know came over on the marriage lottery. I haven’t a clue what kind of hoops one has to jump through as a non citizen.
My missus wanted to move back to the States to start her surgical training after she finished her medical degree. Because we were married and she was a US citizen it really wasn't difficult for me. I had my temporary (green card) right to reside after 3 months which allowed me to get a job, a driving licence and Social Security number, my green card with all conditions removed about 6 months after that.

Because we were already married I was able to apply for citizenship at the three year point from entering the country, from filing to becoming a citizen took around 5 months iirc.

I've no idea what the immigration process is these days but no doubt it's changed a lot from 30+ years ago.
 
Even the interview and rubber stamp at the Consulate cost us something like $450 for each family member
Feckin hell, I don't think I paid much more than that for all the filling fees, interviews and rubber stamps back when we moved here.
 
Feckin hell, I don't think I paid much more than that for all the filling fees, interviews and rubber stamps back when we moved here.
It didn’t bother me, stuck it on the credit card and expensed it. Getting the whole family to London for the interview at the Consulate was a bigger ball ache. It could only be done there, not at the Edinburgh Consulate.
 
My missus wanted to move back to the States to start her surgical training after she finished her medical degree. Because we were married and she was a US citizen it really wasn't difficult for me. I had my temporary (green card) right to reside after 3 months which allowed me to get a job, a driving licence and Social Security number, my green card with all conditions removed about 6 months after that.

Because we were already married I was able to apply for citizenship at the three year point from entering the country, from filing to becoming a citizen took around 5 months iirc.

I've no idea what the immigration process is these days but no doubt it's changed a lot from 30+ years ago.
I would imagine it is a Federal Cluster Sam.
 
First off, most important question that needs answering: How do you plan on getting a greencard?

Remember I have done it without having work lined up here.

Happy to help, advise, cajole and take the piss in any way that could possibly help you get over.
 
The hoops are many and varied, and above all, expensive to get through. I was on an L1 intra-company transfer and I know that it was an expensive business for the company. Even the interview and rubber stamp at the Consulate cost us something like $450 for each family member, but I shudder to think what the petition paperwork produced by the Attorney cost the company.
All in as an independent it cost us around $8000 for a family of 4. That was applications, medicals, trips to the embassy, translation of important doc's from German to English, fee's, etc, etc, etc.

As for hoop's, they have those, the US Govt/civil service is a very large and not very joined up entity who regularly fail to meet their workflow production targets.
 
All in as an independent it cost us around $8000 for a family of 4. That was applications, medicals, trips to the embassy, translation of important doc's from German to English, fee's, etc, etc, etc.

As for hoop's, they have those, the US Govt/civil service is a very large and not very joined up entity who regularly fail to meet their workflow production targets.
Wow! Shocked but not surprised.
 
Wow! Shocked but not surprised.
The Mrs uses immigration attorneys to get staff over on the H visa's and they charge her/the company around $30K a time for their 'expert' assistance.
 
It didn’t bother me, stuck it on the credit card and expensed it. Getting the whole family to London for the interview at the Consulate was a bigger ball ache. It could only be done there, not at the Edinburgh Consulate.
The travel from Edinburgh to London was the same for us as well. Would have been easier if it could have been done at the consulate.
 
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