Mountain madness

#1
Having spent the bank holiday weekend bimbling around the Brecon Beacons, I must say that the number of ********* who go up there is amazing.

Most people seem happy to wear jeans, trainers and t shirt. No map, no compass, no water or scran. No idea.

Fair one, the weather was good this time, but how quick can that change on the hill ?

One young couple asked me for directions to where they left the car - but they couldn't remember the name of the place !

Un fuckin believable !
 
#2
Mate, have a chat with Mountain Search and Rescue boys if you want stories of real, crass stupidity on behalf of the general public
 
#4
Years ago, I was told that if you went more than 50 metres off the roads in Dartmoor, you were in a 3-4 per cent group, out of the millions who visit each year. I can't believe that the Beacons, or Lake District are any different.

One tale I was told was that women walk up Snowdon, in high heels, but can't come back downhill.
 
#5
I regularly walk the Cheviot Hills and come across people kitted out as you have detailed ... sometimes with a map / route from the Readers Digest / Newspaper Supplement or similar but sans Compass ... Bank Holidays seem to encourage these people to run to the hills like Lemmings for excitement ... another factor they do not realise is that Mobile Phones do not always work when you drop into a valley and as you say and I know the weather can suddenly change rapidly for the worse .
 
#6
Years ago, I was told that if you went more than 50 metres off the roads in Dartmoor, you were in a 3-4 per cent group, out of the millions who visit each year. I can't believe that the Beacons, or Lake District are any different.

One tale I was told was that women walk up Snowdon, in high heels, but can't come back downhill.
I did Snowdon last March, thick snow on the upper bit, we were undergunned without crampons to be honest, but some dappy northern f**ker came sliding past me in a hoodie, jeans and toe-tectors, his made had Adidas Sambas on. How I wished them a slidey screamy death.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#7
I did Snowdon last March, thick snow on the upper bit, we were undergunned without crampons to be honest, but some dappy northern f**ker came sliding past me in a hoodie, jeans and toe-tectors, his made had Adidas Sambas on. How I wished them a slidey screamy death.
Yeah that train is scary.
 
#8
I know of at least 2 instances in 3 years where my unit on an AT trip has helped out civvies who are were very badly equipped and would have required mountain rescue. Most recently taking 3 frenchies off a mountain near Ben Nevis who were wearing trainers and had no map. It was a white-out and in winter conditions. they asked our guys what the number was for the helicopter, and if they could borrow our phone to call it (they had run out of batteries and could not really speak English).
We had to cut up ropes to dog lead them down.
The other lot was in the lakes, and was a similar story but in summer conditions at night.

This on top of the groups that have received friendly advice, who are too numerous to mention.

it really is amazing how many are out there, and lucky more have not been killed.
 
T

Tinman74

Guest
#9
Same up Helvellyn last week, nutters.
Was up there in the winter saw a family bumbling around red tarn, in trainers jeans and Barbour jackets, refusing my advice to turn around and go back as striding edge in it's state was iffy to the best of us, ice axes and crampons to boot!
 
#10
I overtook a German family on Nevis a few years back, kids were all kitted out-waterproofs and little daysacks n boots etc and mum looked reasonable. As I passed I had to stifle sniggers when I realised the dad was in leather jeans and what might have been cowboy boots.
 
#11
plus ca change, c'est la meme chose!

Slightly built 14year old kid, 70 lb pack, Bleaklow in the Peak, winter, snow, visibility 10 yards, and bugger all useful in the 70lbs pack!

1970 !
 
T

Tinman74

Guest
#12
I am up the lakes atleast every other weekend and the sights you see, they really should start billing those that have not prepared for the changeable conditions. I carry enough shit that I sometimes I never left the army. And the people who can't even map
Read!!!!! Boils my piss!
 
#13
Having spent the bank holiday weekend bimbling around the Brecon Beacons, I must say that the number of ********* who go up there is amazing.

Most people seem happy to wear jeans, trainers and t shirt. No map, no compass, no water or scran. No idea.

Fair one, the weather was good this time, but how quick can that change on the hill ?

One young couple asked me for directions to where they left the car - but they couldn't remember the name of the place !

Un fuckin believable !
Its always the same when you have this sort of weather,its not so bad when were having good spells of weather like we are experiencing at the moment its when its changeable thats when problems really begin,usually a lack of visibility is chief reason among them.The unprepared generally just follow there noses into the hills,then they lose visibility and a nice day out suddenly turns into a bit of a drama.But you can include scenarios from all of the above as well,lack of navigational equipment ,lack of proper clothing etc etc ,i was out in the Western Brecons over easter weekend me and the missus both had rucksacks on and had a map,compass,gps,between us also with our own warm kit & waterproofs etc.A few people were looking at us like we were mad,it was a glorious day and perhaps given the weather it was overkill on our behalf but you should always be prepared for it to turn into a shitty day.

Incident Reports | Langdale/Ambleside Mountain Rescue Team

Just scanned through the first page,couple on the fairfield horseshoe no map compass etc,another couple using google maps to navigate with,class!!
 
#14
what really striking is the difference between the determination and preparedness of some (a woman who self evacd herself with a broken ankle, refusing help even when it was offered for example) contrasted with the ****-tools with google maps. emperor mong has been know to occasionally take hold of all of us at one time or another, but these guys need to get the message the mountain can be very dangerous.

The question is what to do about it?, signs in car parks/ start of popular walks would be a good start, but we really need to educate people before they get to the mountains.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#15
It does amaze me that folk seem to think that the Highlands are some sort of theme park, that there'll be cafes at the top of mountains where they can buy a coffee and a roll!
I've always lugged a bergan with me even on small low ones, never regretted it as you never know what might happen when.
I do think there is a place for charging those who require evacuation due to their own stupidity and under preparation.
 
#16
It does amaze me that folk seem to think that the Highlands are some sort of theme park, that there'll be cafes at the top of mountains where they can buy a coffee and a roll!
I've always lugged a bergan with me even on small low ones, never regretted it as you never know what might happen when.
I do think there is a place for charging those who require evacuation due to their own stupidity and under preparation.
Its amazing isnt it?

I've worked Mountain Rescue and the horror stories are endless.

My favorite was one day at the top end of Glen Coe. My rather experienced mate and I had decided the day was hust to nasty having poped our heads over the top of a ridge on the Buachaille Etive Beag (Little Sheppard) and almost been blown off....and the snow section looked a bit suspect as well. As we were coming back down the vally (followed by other pairs of climbers all making the same call) we passed two teenage kids clad in trainers and hoodies, clutching snowboards heading in the oposite direction.
My mate, who's from Yorkshire and has tea and sarcasm instead of blood, made some pithy comment about when they wanted the ambulance called and every single group they passed urged them to turn back. I just looked grim mostly 'cos my beard was full of ice and I couldnt think of anything other than I wanted a brew.
Once we got to the bottom we just went and sat in the Kings and waited. . .

I really dont know what we should do to stop idiots going on the hills unprepared. Post death stats at the car parks?
 
#17
I did Snowdon last March, thick snow on the upper bit, we were undergunned without crampons to be honest, but some dappy northern f**ker came sliding past me in a hoodie, jeans and toe-tectors, his made had Adidas Sambas on. How I wished them a slidey screamy death.
Feck, I didn't think anyone noticed
 
#18
Its amazing isnt it?

I've worked Mountain Rescue and the horror stories are endless.

My favorite was one day at the top end of Glen Coe. My rather experienced mate and I had decided the day was hust to nasty having poped our heads over the top of a ridge on the Buachaille Etive Beag (Little Sheppard) and almost been blown off....and the snow section looked a bit suspect as well. As we were coming back down the vally (followed by other pairs of climbers all making the same call) we passed two teenage kids clad in trainers and hoodies, clutching snowboards heading in the oposite direction.
My mate, who's from Yorkshire and has tea and sarcasm instead of blood, made some pithy comment about when they wanted the ambulance called and every single group they passed urged them to turn back. I just looked grim mostly 'cos my beard was full of ice and I couldnt think of anything other than I wanted a brew.
Once we got to the bottom we just went and sat in the Kings and waited. . .

I really dont know what we should do to stop idiots going on the hills unprepared. Post death stats at the car parks?
I think the only way is to put some sort of hard hitting signs at car parks. People do little if any research into their trip. They appear to get up in the morning and think "I am off to Everest today" and off they go on their merry way.
 
#19
Same in the Lake Disrict. Stumblies everywhere. Dressed for a day by the lake and heading up a mountain! More than half the kit I carry is 'just in case' kit. With them you're lucky if they have a daysack between them - more likely a plastic carrier bag. Have had to help this type out several times.

Worst case I have had - December snow on the ground, decending from Langdale having just taken crampons off, goggles on forehead and ice axe still in hand and advising a group of people in town clothes and shoes that it might not be a good idea if they progressed any further up the hill as it gets worse quite quickly. Answer? 'Oh, it's alright we were up here last September and know the way'!

But now you also have a different type. Those that do have mostly the right kit and have a little experience BUT do not carry a map and compass. They wander around the hills looking at their hand which contains a GPS/Google Maps device of some sort. Ask them what the scenery was like up and down the hill and they will not know but can describle perfectly what their GPS looks like. What is the point?

And then when they hit heavy fog/low cloud/whiteout and they are goosed. Or of course the batteries die - spares? - I think not! Ask any Mountain Rescue group for the horror stories. And of course it is the MR guys that have to recover these idiots back down the hill when they get lost or stuck.

I do my best to avoid the crowds in the Lakes and never visit on a bank holiday. Grrrr!

And breathe.


Q.
 
#20
Or of course the batteries die - spares? - I think not! Ask any Mountain Rescue group for the horror stories. And of course it is the MR guys that have to recover these idiots back down the hill when they get lost or stuck.
I rember sitting on a rock besides a mini-bus waiting for a bunch of students to finish on Tryfan. It was quite entertaining to see the head-torches going out one by one. Luckily they had two very experienced friends of mine with them. I was in hysterics for a bit when I saw the two 'still on' torches group up and waggle around for 5 minutes (In my mind I could hear the bolloxing being handed out to the idiots who forgot the spare bats) and then seperate one at front and one at back. They got bought a lot of beer for the rest of the trip. I've never gone on the hill without spare bats and a backup torch since....
 

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