• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Motorway driving for learners

#3

Momba Womba

On ROPS
On ROPs
#6
#8
No.

Recent pass people - are they green R plates in UK? Or is that Ireland, I forget - should have a module to do before they are completely unrestricted.

The motorway is not the place for learners.
I wouldn't want a learner on their first lesson to drive on the motorway, but they would benefit more from an early introduction, before bad habits, complacency, or overconfidence creep in. As it stands, learners can drive on dual-carriageway A roads which have all the risks of motorways but with fewer safeguards.
 
#9
Hopefully the instructors will take the time to point out the middle aged idiots driving in lanes 2, and sometimes 3 on the four lane stretches, who never change lane and point out that's how not to drive; but since I've passed at least one driving an AA motoring school car I'm sadly not convinced.
 
#12
Hopefully the instructors will take the time to point out the middle aged idiots driving in lanes 2, and sometimes 3 on the four lane stretches, who never change lane and point out that's how not to drive; but since I've passed at least one driving an AA motoring school car I'm sadly not convinced.
You may have a point. But what is the demographic most likely to be involved in a RTC?
 
#14
The driving test should change. It should require a requisite amount of hours, with a number of stages - night drive, skid car, basic car maintenance etc followed by minimum 2 hour test.

Then when they have passed, they should be limited in power, same as motorbikes.
 
#15
The 'let me show you' option works well.
Take a youngster along a motorway, all the time explaining what you are doing, and why you are doing it, and adding observations.
Then let him have a go.
I recall being on a driving course where whoever was in the driving seat was required to keep up a commentary. One guy (from a village somewhere deep in the sticks) had run out of things to say and started to tell us about the various crops in the adjoining fields
 
#18
For the vast majority of young and new drivers, insurance premiums take care of that.
Mate of mine Mother-in-law had a stroke, so couldn't drive.
She had a year-old Fiat 1.4, and said that the grandson could have it.
One slight problem - it was in Jo'burg.
No hassle - i was there for work for few days, and rather than fly back, offered to drive the thing back to Cape Town on the Friday.
Got it here, delivered it the next morning, took kid out to show him the ropes etc etc etc and point out the car's potential foibles.
Kid is happy.
It lasted a few hours - that night the little fecker loaded about six of his mates into it, and was doing the 'look how quick this will go' trick, lost control, twatted it into the central reservation.
8" kerbstone - Blam.
Car was a write-off. Fortunately it didn't roll, but there were some shaky kids afterwards.
Bellend.
 
#19
I agree with Dinger tbh.
Use the same models as they do in Finland, night drives, skid pan etc and then a restriction on what size engine a learner is allowed to drive, going up in stages as long as they keep a clean licence.
 
#20
I think the biggest danger is from idiots who read the headline but not the detail, and we end up with a learner driving on the motorway ("it's legal, init!") rather than a driver under instruction in a dual-control vehicle.

Could make policing more interesting on motorways I guess.
 

Latest Threads

New Posts