Motorcycle licence.

#1
I'm looking to do my bike licence, and with all the new restrictions its stopping me getting the bike I want. However, members of the armed forces have an exception to restrictions, so I rang up only to be told that we get our licences on "our special bases"

Has anyone on here managed to get there licence through the army? And how they went about it?
 
#2
I'm looking to do my bike licence, and with all the new restrictions its stopping me getting the bike I want. However, members of the armed forces have an exception to restrictions, so I rang up only to be told that we get our licences on "our special bases"

Has anyone on here managed to get there licence through the army? And how they went about it?
The exceptions only apply when you're on HM Forces duty, not for your personal machine.
 
#3
Has anyone on here managed to get there licence through the army? And how they went about it?
I did the course (2 weeks) with Shugi in BAOR, passed.

I assume you are under one of the age limits? No way around it bud.

Best advice; start slow on bikes don't think you can leap onto a 150hp Yamahondukati full race spec scuicide machine with 2 weeks experience.

Build up to it, go on courses. It may sound old farty, but I would seriosly recommend doing the Institute of Advanced Motorists bike course and/or the RoSPA bike course. You will be taught by x-spurts who are generally off duty Police Class 1 Instructors. If you know anything about biking these blokes are the biking equivelent of THEM, they are to be listened to and respected when they give advice, honest.
 
J

Joshua Slocum

Guest
#5
if you are in the UK check the councils road safety department, they organise for a small fee better biking courses with the rozzers off duty
Gloucestershire's Better Biking Courses
also lots of them do private tuiton
however as a long term motoryclists I must say that some lessons you need to learn the hard way !
if you are over 21 you can always do direct entry, but I would still advise a smaller ( around 30 to 60 HP) bike until you have got some miles in
 
#6
Or ignore that advice but please carry a Donor Card!!!
Donor, what do you need ......... I might know a bloke in China.............

Story: I was on duty in the Salisbury nick control room and we get a call late'ish one night. This bloke said he was driving home in thick fog and he was whalloped by something front on. He stopped his motor, got out had a look around. There was a dent on the front of the car. He looked around the area but found nothing.

We sent the local car out. He found the bloke. They both had a look around and found nothing. Details were taken in case some farmer complained about a dented cow.

Next morning the fog lifted and the nick got another call about a body and a motorbike in a field. The accident investigator reckoned that judging by the point of impact on the car the bike and some debris on the road that the biker had been white lining in the fog. The pathologist reckoned the bloke had been alive for a few hours after the impact but unable to move due to his injuries and just bled out internally.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#7
My kid brother has a snap from his time as a SOCO. Called out to a night-time bike/car interface where Plod could find no sign of the rider, come daylight and our now extinct rider was discovered draped over the top of a nearby streetlight.

For the OP; heed the advice regarding training-up to the machine of your desire/demise.
 
#8
The exceptions only apply when you're on HM Forces duty, not for your personal machine.
Correct. As long as it's got something to do with his job that he needs the motorbike licence for.

Like I've said elsewhere, 2 lads in the Falklands did their courses (civvy side) and claimed most of the fees off their SLC/ELC. Mind you, there are no roundabouts out there and my boss was RAF and would sign anything.
 
J

Joshua Slocum

Guest
#10
one of the problems of a smaller motorcycle is that cars bully you
they think that you are a moped, recently I pulled alongside a minge rover on my brother in laws Suzuki Burgman, the lights were red but the idiot driver started moving forwards to demonstrate his greater social standing, however when the lights changed i nailed it and left him and his 3 tonne heap for dead
trouble is the burgman is quite small and to the unititiated looks like a moped ( a 500cc Moped)
the fact I was wearing full leathers, black and old should have warned him
but i have been riding for too many years both here and abroad to be bullied
one of my friends recently took up motorcycling again, but I made him do a refresher course with a local training school
they put him on a rolling road machine to start with
then out on a 125 yammy with two way headset radio
after a few days he got his confidence back and they then went onto a Kawasaki ER5 he loved it so much he bought one
he origionally rode in the 70s but things have moved on
the ER5 is only around 50BHP but has a presence on the road enough power to keep a reasonable speed and decent brakes and lights, he did want to buy a blade but I said if he did then I would insist he toured with me for three days to either get used to it or write it off !!
its a long learning curve and I am still learning, you need to read the road, smell the road, feel the weather, and learn to read drivers minds, and learn to recognise certain types of vehicles that will take you out ( german usually)
also you need to be confident but not arrogant, as I pointed out to one young man its one thing to race your bike round the estate looking the big man, but at 3 am in the pissing rain you need to feel the road and know your limits, and know when to stop and give up ( you cant die in your sleep)
otherwise the results do not bear thinking about
ps a few years ago I rode from Metz in france across Switzerland, over the Andermatt Glacier and down into Italy taking from 11 am till 3 am, I could get no accomadation so carried on, but after this many years I know when to relax and go slow, and let the bike take control and have done enough miles on my Guzzi to know her as well as my wife ( shes only 48BHP)
also learn to control and get rid of the red mist, that kills
remember riding a motorcycle is like sitting on the front of a mack truck, lots of fun and fast but the truck dont feel pain when it hits things

3 am Italy where the **** is every one ? oh asleep
see do it right and you can have fun
do it wrong and you get a car with hand controls
if you want pain try BDSM !!
Italy trip 441.jpg
 
#11
Correct. As long as it's got something to do with his job that he needs the motorbike licence for.

Like I've said elsewhere, 2 lads in the Falklands did their courses (civvy side) and claimed most of the fees off their SLC/ELC. Mind you, there are no roundabouts out there and my boss was RAF and would sign anything.
Is that the case as I had one of my lads try that and he got fucked off.
 
#12
When i passed my test I started on a 600 then a month later got a Fireblade. The power of the bike is irrelevant, if your a shit rider, bellend rider or think your Rossi you will spank in regardless of what your riding.
 
#13
Well put Josh. Awareness of your surroundings at all time is paramount. It's similar to the old adage that 'the gun is always loaded and the horse always kicks'. Car drivers are always ******* blind!
 
#14
Is that the case as I had one of my lads try that and he got fucked off.
It depends who is helping them fill the forms out and doing the blagging. :)

They were REME blokes and used to fix our photocopiers and printers. I have no idea why they were doing that job down there, but hey - you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours.
 
J

Joshua Slocum

Guest
#16
Well put Josh. Awareness of your surroundings at all time is paramount. It's similar to the old adage that 'the gun is always loaded and the horse always kicks'. Car drivers are always ******* blind!
spot on
I have helped many people over the years to learn to ride, all of them are still with us and riding well
when I took flying lessons my instructor said I was a motorcylist straight off ?? how did he know that as I walked to the airfield
he said its the way you handle the controls sensitive
car drivers use the controls in a different way
dont worry I dont fly any more
I get airsick adn I am really scared of heights, as soon as he leaned the bloody thing my fingers dug a hole in the dash, so I let him fly it while I took pictures
know your limitations, I know I am not responsible enough to control a plane
I have met a few young people who had a totally different level of motorcycle control and feedback, they seemed to lean further and ride faster and smoother than me, but then thats the same with some athletes, the problem is when you try to ride like Valentino Rossi ? dont forget one of our greatest ever motorcycle racers Mike the Bike Hailwood, gentleman, hero and a wonderful role model was killed in his car popping out for fish and chips , he really was the greatest ever
adn he could race a motor car as well
he was also awarded the George Mdeal for saving Clay Regazzonis life
 
#18
If you can take the test that allows you to ride up to 46bhp, then that actually opens up quite a few good machines for you to ride.

I myself, and quite a number of my friends have all gone and traded in or put to the back of the shed our old, big engined bikes and have gone for the smaller sized ones.Several reasons..but for me, Partially because my new 650cc BMW G650GS gets exactly twice the mpg as my old BMW R1150GSA which amounts to a huge saving in fuel costs on a big trip ( £2500 in fuel savings on the last trip alone ) and also because smaller bikes are an absolute hoot to ride around on.

Plus in my particular interest which is " Adventure Motorcycling " as I believe its currently called, anyone in the know, is turning their backs on these overpowered and hugely over priced on/off road bikes like the current GS. Smaller bikes are far better in almost every aspect in this kind of category.
 
#19
a bottle or two of good malt always eases business decisions ?
I only ever dealt in biscuits (sorry CBF - yes, they ended up in my office), choclit, ice-creams, priority photocopier fixing, Gold Blend coffee and printer toners.

"Of course I'll get the boss to sign the Part Time Teacher/ELC/363 forms".

I couldn't get the LECs to fix the roof in the computer room though until I offered to do it myself with a black bag and some black nasty.

"You can't do that".

"Watch me".
 
J

Joshua Slocum

Guest
#20
If you can take the test that allows you to ride up to 46bhp, then that actually opens up quite a few good machines for you to ride.

I myself, and quite a number of my friends have all gone and traded in or put to the back of the shed our old, big engined bikes and have gone for the smaller sized ones.Several reasons..but for me, Partially because my new 650cc BMW G650GS gets exactly twice the mpg as my old BMW R1150GSA which amounts to a huge saving in fuel costs on a big trip ( £2500 in fuel savings on the last trip alone ) and also because smaller bikes are an absolute hoot to ride around on.

Plus in my particular interest which is " Adventure Motorcycling " as I believe its currently called, anyone in the know, is turning their backs on these overpowered and hugely over priced on/off road bikes like the current GS. Smaller bikes are far better in almost every aspect in this kind of category.

spot on
I ride a 750 48bhp 170Kg machine
it will creep up (allegedly) to 110 mph
but I usually ride around 50 to 60 mph and 70 on the Strada
its light enough to move about, cheap enough on tyres and running costs, and things like brake pads last a long while
Ted Simon rode around the world on a 500cc triumph ?
I used to own a K100RS lovely motorcycle but heavy and eats tyres and brake pads, and when you motor along narrow roads or glaciers you need a motorcycle as nimble as a goat, not an elephant

at last my bike gets glammed.jpg
 

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