Mothers of UK backpacker killers beg Thai king for sons' lives

Should the King of Thailand commute the death sentance to life in prison?

  • Yes

    Votes: 9 11.7%
  • No

    Votes: 14 18.2%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 2 2.6%
  • F**k em

    Votes: 42 54.5%
  • Don't give a toss

    Votes: 10 13.0%

  • Total voters
    77
The migrant workers from Myanmar are facing the death penalty for murdering Britons David Miller and Hannah Witheridge in 2014.

A very sad video of the 2 men's mothers crying on camera and whinging to the King to spare their sons, 3 appeals have failed and now he is the only one standing between them and an eternity of hellfire, minus God himself!

VIDEO IN THE ARTICLE OF 2 WOMEN BEGGING FOR SONS LIVES


The mothers of two men on death row in Thailand for the murders of two British backpackers have begged the country’s king to spare their sons.

Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin, migrant workers from Myanmar, were sentenced to death in 2015 after being found guilty of murdering David Miller, 24, and murdering and raping Hannah Witheridge, 23.

Their badly beaten bodies were discovered on a beach on the holiday island of Koh Tao in 2014.

Three court appeals attempting to overturn the death sentences have failed, so now the mothers of the convicted men have come to Bangkok to ask for a pardon from the king.

Speaking exclusively to Sky News ahead of submitting their petition, Phyu Shwe Nu, 55, and Taw May Thein, 52, maintained their sons are innocent.

"Don't kill my son," Phyu Shwe Nu sobbed. "My son didn't do it, my son didn't kill them. Please return them to us."

In August, Thailand's Supreme Court upheld the guilty verdicts - meaning the Thai monarch is now the only person who can overturn the death sentences.

Their families claim they've been framed.

"My son said the Thai police caught them and beat them many times," Wai Phyo's mother Taw May Thein said.

"'Listen all of you,' the Thai police said, 'We'll burn you, chop you up, put you in a bag and throw it away'.

"Police forced my son. The boys were scared and confessed. He is innocent; why is this happening? After we heard our son's sentence, his father went crazy and passed away. Maybe I'll be next."

The mothers of the men on death row have come to Bangkok in a desperate attempt to obtain a pardon from the king

The mothers of the condemned men have travelled to Bangkok to seek a royal pardon

Police say evidence including DNA found at the scene and on Ms Witheridge's body led to Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin.

Police Colonel Kissana Phathanacharoen, deputy spokesman of Royal Thai Police, said: "We followed the legal procedure as to how we treated the offenders.

"We respected the principals of human rights and strictly follow the rules.

"They have all their rights guaranteed by Thai law. If there was any brutality or torture as claimed, they have the right to bring legal action against the Thai authorities. In five years they haven't done this."

The badly beaten bodies of the British couple were found on a beach of the popular resort
The Supreme Court dismissed claims of physical mistreatment and mishandling of forensic evidence, saying the forensic work was done by respectable institutions and there was no proof of torture.

The family of Mr Miller has repeatedly expressed its view that justice has been done and the evidence against the men was overwhelming.

However, following the Supreme Court verdict, Mr Miller's father Ian said he hoped the death penalty would be withdrawn in exchange for prison sentences.

King Maha Vajiralongkorn was crowned back in May

thailande-roi-mahavajiralongkorn.jpg


Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn is being asked to commute the death sentences

Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo's families will now submit a petition to the king asking that he commutes the death sentences to life in prison instead.

All death sentences in Thailand had been commuted by royal pardon in the nine years prior to a convicted murderer being executed by lethal injection in June last year.

Both mothers know this is their last chance and that the king could uphold the execution order at any time, but they refuse to abandon their sons.

"Every night I pray for him, it's all I can do," Taw May Thein cries.
 
The migrant workers from Myanmar are facing the death penalty for murdering Britons David Miller and Hannah Witheridge in 2014.
A very sad video of the 2 men's mothers crying on camera and whinging to the King to spare their sons, 3 appeals have failed and now he is the only one standing between them and an eternity of hellfire, minus God himself!
VIDEO IN THE ARTICLE OF 2 WOMEN BEGGING FOR SONS LIVES


The mothers of two men on death row in Thailand for the murders of two British backpackers have begged the country’s king to spare their sons.

Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin, migrant workers from Myanmar, were sentenced to death in 2015 after being found guilty of murdering David Miller, 24, and murdering and raping Hannah Witheridge, 23.

Their badly beaten bodies were discovered on a beach on the holiday island of Koh Tao in 2014.

Three court appeals attempting to overturn the death sentences have failed, so now the mothers of the convicted men have come to Bangkok to ask for a pardon from the king.

Speaking exclusively to Sky News ahead of submitting their petition, Phyu Shwe Nu, 55, and Taw May Thein, 52, maintained their sons are innocent.

"Don't kill my son," Phyu Shwe Nu sobbed. "My son didn't do it, my son didn't kill them. Please return them to us."

In August, Thailand's Supreme Court upheld the guilty verdicts - meaning the Thai monarch is now the only person who can overturn the death sentences.

Their families claim they've been framed.

"My son said the Thai police caught them and beat them many times," Wai Phyo's mother Taw May Thein said.

"'Listen all of you,' the Thai police said, 'We'll burn you, chop you up, put you in a bag and throw it away'.

"Police forced my son. The boys were scared and confessed. He is innocent; why is this happening? After we heard our son's sentence, his father went crazy and passed away. Maybe I'll be next."

The mothers of the men on death row have come to Bangkok in a desperate attempt to obtain a pardon from the king

The mothers of the condemned men have travelled to Bangkok to seek a royal pardon

Police say evidence including DNA found at the scene and on Ms Witheridge's body led to Wai Phyo and Zaw Lin.

Police Colonel Kissana Phathanacharoen, deputy spokesman of Royal Thai Police, said: "We followed the legal procedure as to how we treated the offenders.

"We respected the principals of human rights and strictly follow the rules.

"They have all their rights guaranteed by Thai law. If there was any brutality or torture as claimed, they have the right to bring legal action against the Thai authorities. In five years they haven't done this."

The badly beaten bodies of the British couple were found on a beach of the popular resort
The Supreme Court dismissed claims of physical mistreatment and mishandling of forensic evidence, saying the forensic work was done by respectable institutions and there was no proof of torture.

The family of Mr Miller has repeatedly expressed its view that justice has been done and the evidence against the men was overwhelming.

However, following the Supreme Court verdict, Mr Miller's father Ian said he hoped the death penalty would be withdrawn in exchange for prison sentences.

King Maha Vajiralongkorn was crowned back in May

View attachment 424341

Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn is being asked to commute the death sentences

Zaw Lin and Wai Phyo's families will now submit a petition to the king asking that he commutes the death sentences to life in prison instead.

All death sentences in Thailand had been commuted by royal pardon in the nine years prior to a convicted murderer being executed by lethal injection in June last year.

Both mothers know this is their last chance and that the king could uphold the execution order at any time, but they refuse to abandon their sons.

"Every night I pray for him, it's all I can do," Taw May Thein cries.
I disagree with the death penalty on the principle that you can't undo it if the evidence it was based on turns out to be incomplete / incorrect.

Also, in this case even the family of the victims (well, one of them) doesn't want them to be executed.
 
I'm concerned that Sky got exclusivity. Shouldn't they have approached all media outlets to remove any doubt that this is little more than a publicity exercise for Sky and not the families of the suspects? Perhaps his maj will commute to life. :cool:
 
The word on the street among those "in the know" is the real culprit of these murders was the influential son of someone with connections to the government. A high ranking police officer's son, IIRC.

Either way, this verdict is a set-up and about straight as a 13 Baht note.
 

endure

GCM
**** 'em. If you're big enough to do the murdering, you're big enough to get a piece of the death penalty.

We could learn a lot from the Thais.

We could learn absolutely nothing about justice or the rule of law from them. Corruption, payola and the letting off of 'big men' for crimes they've committed is rife.
 

morsk

LE
He deserved to die, Ben Afleck looking futher mucker
 
We could learn absolutely nothing about justice or the rule of law from them. Corruption, payola and the letting off of 'big men' for crimes they've committed is rife.
The Thai system to a tee.

And the new Thai King is one of the biggest crooks there is.
 
**** 'em. If you're big enough to do the murdering, you're big enough to get a piece of the death penalty.

We could learn a lot from the Thais.
He looks like a reasonable guy to be honest, I'm not too clued up on history but it seems they has been quite a few pardons dished out in recent years minus one in June this year as if the pardons come out on tap.

Maybe the mothers could be cocubines?

1250631-mahavajiralongkornedited-1480608278-337-640x480.jpg
 
I disagree with the death penalty on the principle that you can't undo it if the evidence it was based on turns out to be incomplete / incorrect.

Also, in this case even the family of the victims (well, one of them) doesn't want them to be executed.
I want to do a bet with you, interested?

£10 to H4H the King is going to tell them to f**k off, the case being so high profile and obviously to make an example which will vehementaly send a message over Thailand, apparently tourism accounts for 10% of the economy, we can't have young lads slotting our customers can we now, sound reasonable?
 
The word on the street among those "in the know" is the real culprit of these murders was the influential son of someone with connections to the government. A high ranking police officer's son, IIRC.

Either way, this verdict is a set-up and about straight as a 13 Baht note.
What conspiracy site did you read that on?
 
We could learn absolutely nothing about justice or the rule of law from them. Corruption, payola and the letting off of 'big men' for crimes they've committed is rife.
I don't know about the justice system in Thailand so can't comment but I was interviewed under caution in the UK when arrested on suspicion of assault and one of the most intelligent things I ever did was to ask for the duty solicitor whom the custody officer informed me I have a right to access free of charge...

Because everything is recorded and can be used later on.

Do they not have lawyers in Thailand?
 

endure

GCM
I want to do a bet with you, interested?

£10 to H4H the King is going to tell them to f**k off, the case being so high profile and obviously to make an example which will vehementaly send a message over Thailand, apparently tourism accounts for 10% of the economy, we can't have young lads slotting our customers can we now, sound reasonable?

You have no idea at all about how things work in Thailand. The King doesn't have the slightest interest in the Thai economy. Why would he? He's worth $30 billion at the last count.

Lese Majeste is still a crime in Thailand. It attracts sentences of up to 15 years in prison.
 

endure

GCM
I don't know about the justice system in Thailand so can't comment but I was interviewed under caution in the UK when arrested on suspicion of assault and one of the most intelligent things I ever did was to ask for the duty solicitor whom the custody officer informed me I have a right to access free of charge...

Because everything is recorded and can be used later on.

Do they not have lawyers in Thailand?

Interviewed under caution? Duty solicitor? Custody officer?

FFS! LOL they don't even have jury trials in Thailand. It's a judge (maybe 2). The trial is completely conducted in Thai. If you can't afford a translator mai pen rai...
 

endure

GCM
I don't know about the justice system in Thailand so can't comment but I was interviewed under caution in the UK when arrested on suspicion of assault and one of the most intelligent things I ever did was to ask for the duty solicitor whom the custody officer informed me I have a right to access free of charge...

Because everything is recorded and can be used later on.

Do they not have lawyers in Thailand?

Thai policemen are poorly paid. They are required to provide their own uniforms, guns and motorbikes. Where do you think the money comes from to pay for them?
 
Thai policemen are poorly paid. They are required to provide their own uniforms, guns and motorbikes. Where do you think the money comes from to pay for them?
The guy who flys the police helicopter must be really, really corrupt....
 
Interviewed under caution? Duty solicitor? Custody officer?

FFS! LOL they don't even have jury trials in Thailand. It's a judge (maybe 2). The trial is completely conducted in Thai. If you can't afford a translator mai pen rai...
Ahh here we go

"Mai pen rai is most commonly used as an equivalent to English phrases like “you're welcome” or “don't mention it”, and it's often heard as a response to “thank you”. But mai pen rai carries deeper meaning than this. When asked to translate it into English, one Thai replied, “It's okay… everything is okay… don't worry”."
 

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