Most Ugly Aircraft

I don't think that the Cutlass was particlarly ugly, in fact if you can ignore the overly bulged cockpit and stalky landing gear, it's quite pretty and, for the 1950s, futuristic. Unfortunately, it was, not to put too fine a point on it, sh!t at flying. It was so bad that it was known as "the ensign eliminator". A lot of the issues were due to the Westingjouse J35 engine which was critically underpowered and had a nasty habit of flaming out in rain!
1575300409341.png

From Wiki: "On the positive side, test pilots found it a stable weapons platform, maneuverable, fun to fly and the strengthened airframe to be sturdy. Test pilots particularly praised its high roll rate at 570 degrees/s, three times faster than most production jets at the time."

Unfortunately not all pilots are highly experienced test pilots and the aircraft was difficult to fly for the novice, not helped by the nose high landing / takeoff attitude necessary to compensate for the lack of puff from the engines.
1575300651322.png
 
I don't think that the Cutlass was particlarly ugly...it's quite pretty...
I bet you're attracted to ladies with 'nice personalities' as well!

Regards,
MM
 
One of the best looking women I ever bedded was, to put it mildly, useless between the sheets and one of my personal rules is "never go to bed with someone you don't want to wake up next to".

Failing that, I have standards. They are low, but I have them.






I keep them in a folder in the locked filing cabinet.
 
One of the best looking women I ever bedded was, to put it mildly, useless between the sheets and one of my personal rules is "never go to bed with someone you don't want to wake up next to".

Failing that, I have standards. They are low, but I have them.






I keep them in a folder in the locked filing cabinet.
'I've never gone to bed with a munter...but I've woken up with a few...'
Anon​

Regards,
MM
 
I'm sure many of you aeroplonk enthusiasts will be aware of zenoswarbirdvideos.com but, as I've just had an email reminding me there's a further 15% off their Black Friday sales ending today (some US timezone) I thought I"d pass it on.

I got a Douglas A20 Boston/Havoc DVD years ago when researching a reli who was Nav/Bomb Aimer killed in one whilst fling with 88 Sqn RAF.
Good resource site worth a look.
 

Yokel

LE
Focke-Achgelis Fa 330

Image result for fa330 u boat

Image result for fa330 u boat
Interesting.

Drawing lots for who would be today's 'observer' would have been fun.
A Sunderland appears, he cable gets cut, and poor Hansl is left a 200ft as U4 crach dives.
Are there any records as to what it achieved - perhaps sighting convoys or escorts at greater range? There must be records somewhere..

I imagine it fell out of use as the war progressed.
 
What the Germans didnt realise was that the rotor gave a beautiful radar "return" and when the bombers went to investigate, they saw this gyro being towed by a submarine. The gyro pilot was cut off as the U-boat dived. If he survived ditching the gyro, he then had to survive the sea long enough to hope that someone rescued him, either his boat or the enemy. The RAF had been using gryos for years as radar calibration aircraft and they knew exactly what the return looked like.
 
Last edited:

Yokel

LE
What the Germans didnt realise was that the rotor gave a beautiful radar "return" and when the bombers went to investigate, they saw this gyro being towed by a submarine. The gyro pilot was cut off as the U-boat dived. If he survived ditching the gyro, he then had to survive the sea long enough to hope that someone rescued him, either his boat or the enemy. The RAF had been using gryos for years as radar calibration aircraft and they knew exactly what the return looked like.
The Royal Navy Swordfish used for anti submarine roles also had ASV radar. I never knew it could pick up an autogyro as well as the vessel on the surface.

However in the early part of the war it might have been useful for the U boat looking for targets.
 

Maalox

War Hero
Are there any records as to what it achieved - perhaps sighting convoys or escorts at greater range? There must be records somewhere..

"As Allied air cover in other theatres of the war was considered too much of a threat, only U-boats operating in the far southern parts of the Atlantic and the Indian Ocean used the Fa 330. Despite its advantages, the use of the Fa 330 resulted in only a single sinking when U-177 used one to spot, intercept and sink the Greek steamer Efthalia Mari on 6 August 1943."
 

Yokel

LE
"As Allied air cover in other theatres of the war was considered too much of a threat, only U-boats operating in the far southern parts of the Atlantic and the Indian Ocean used the Fa 330. Despite its advantages, the use of the Fa 330 resulted in only a single sinking when U-177 used one to spot, intercept and sink the Greek steamer Efthalia Mari on 6 August 1943."
Not an effective use of money and resources then! If every U boat had one then that would have tied up production facilities and taken up storage space in what was already a cramped vessel. Good job the U boats never had float planes as spotter aircraft, which was tried between the two Wars.

By the way have you got a URL?
 
The Royal Navy and Royal Air Force Swordfish used for anti submarine roles also had ASV radar. I never knew it could pick up an autogyro as well as the vessel on the surface.

However in the early part of the war it might have been useful for the U boat looking for targets.
FoC.

Don't forget us Crustaceans also used centimetric ASV equipped variants of the venerable Stringbag from shore bases in the UK and Europe, primarily to counter the German midget-submarine threat. Operations were primarily at night so the aircraft were painted black and fitted with flame suppressors on the exhausts.

One of these can be seen at the IWM, Duxford today. It has apparently been restored to a fully airworthy standard but with only a display engine, presumably due to the cost of certification/operation.

Regards,
MM
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Drawing lots for who would be today's 'observer' would have been fun.
A Sunderland appears, he cable gets cut, and poor Hansl is left a 200ft as U4 crach dives.
I understand that a British report on the Achgelis somewhat drily mentions that the pilot, once the tether was cut, descended to the ocean and there '.drowned in the usual fashion.'
 

Yokel

LE
FoC.

Don't forget us Crustaceans also used centimetric ASV equipped variants of the venerable Stringbag from shore bases in the UK and Europe, primarily to counter the German midget-submarine threat. Operations were primarily at night so the aircraft were painted black and fitted with flame suppressors on the exhausts.

One of these can be seen at the IWM, Duxford today. It has apparently been restored to a fully airworthy standard but with only a display engine, presumably due to the cost of certification/operation.

Regards,
MM
Yes I sometimes forget that RAF Coastal Command had them too. For some reason I thought the RAF ones were used for mine laying.

I understand that a British report on the Achgelis somewhat drily mentions that the pilot, once the tether was cut, descended to the ocean and there '.drowned in the usual fashion.'
It had no power source unlike a normal autogyro so it would not have had much energy to stay up or forward momentum.
 
Last edited:

Latest Threads

Top